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Posts Tagged ‘how to pitch’

SheKnows Needs Strong Writers Who Can ‘Command Social Shares’

She-Knows-ArticleSheKnows.com was founded in 1999 by three moms and a dad, with the hopes of creating a space on the web for a “younger, hipper mom who yearned for something more than her mother’s Good Housekeeping or Better Homes & Gardens.

The site’s target demographic is still women who are seeking modern solutions, but the platform has now added custom videos and webisodes to complement its archive of service-driven articles. SheKnows is 99 percent freelance written and editors are always on the lookout for new writers. Just be sure you have something far from run-of-the-mill to pitch:

All channels are open to freelancers. “Due to the volume of pitches we receive, it is always beneficial for a first-timer to pitch a story that is extremely original — perhaps it’s a hilarious story about a dating nightmare, an investigative story about how millennials are raising their children, an emotionally charged story about raising a child with special needs or an original recipe with stunning custom photos,” [Lauren Swanson, director of editorial operations] says. “The idea is to pitch a story that is relevant to women, jumps off the page and commands social shares.”

To hear more about the mag, including editors’ contact details, read: How To Pitch: SheKnows.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

What AARP The Magazine is Looking for in a Personal Essay

Personal-Essay-Market-Personal essays allow writers to share some of the intimate details of their life with the world, and this can be a cathartic and rewarding experience. It can also be quite lucrative, if you pitch to the right pubs.

In Part I of our newly updated Personal Essay Markets series, we’ve compiled a diverse list of 15 markets that are eager for first-person material from freelancers. Editors from each pub told us exactly they’re looking for. Here’s a sneak peek:

AARP The Magazine
The crucial ingredient in essays for AARP is that they must offer fresh insight into an aspect of life after 50. Style and emotional heft are also important.
Length: 1,200-1,500 words
Pay: $2 a word
Assigning editors: Margaret Guroff or David Dudley, FirstInitialLastName@AARP.org
Guroff’s advice: ”Originality is key. Certain life events, such as caring for a parent with Alzheimer’s disease, inspire many more great essays than we could ever hope to publish. We’re looking for the compelling reads and universal truths in unusual, extreme or common-but-little-discussed life experiences.”

To get similar info on publications like BUST, Elle and American Baby, read: Personal Essay Markets, Part I.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

New Jersey Monthly Seeks Stories that Exemplify the Garden State Spirit

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New Jersey is home to a diverse demographic of residents, and New Jersey Monthly aims to cater to just about all of them. The pub covers a wide rang of topics: politics, education, fashion, entertainment, sports, dining and more.

Freelancers don’t need to live in the Garden State to write for the pub, but their ideas should be tailored to those who do. The mag is 75 percent freelance written, and the pitching opportunities are endless. Just remember that the length of your pitch is important, so try to make it as succinct as possible:

“The pitch has to be long enough to give me some details, but not so long I have to print it out and take it home over the weekend,” editor-in-chief Ken Schlager notes. “Brevity is really important in the pitch.” To land a pitch and be on your way to “regular” status, a great place to start is the front-of-book section “Garden Variety.” Here, articles run 250 to 350 words. The department seeks “short items about events, trends and people of interest.”

For more about the mag, including editors’ contact details, read: How To Pitch: New Jersey Monthly.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Send Your Pitches on Parenting Tweens and Teens to Family Circle

Family-Circle-Article

Family Circle started in 1932 as a women’s mag distributed at grocery stores. It has evolved significantly in the past 82 years yet has stayed true to its core readership: moms.

These days, however, the Meredith-owned publication focuses mostly on the parenting of tweens and teens. So freelancers should steer clear of pitching stories on babies and new moms. Truly understanding the mag’s demo is key to getting a pitch accepted. It’s also good to know which sections are open to freelancers:

“Our Family section and our Health section are the ones that are most likely to use freelancers,” said executive editor Darcy Jacobs. Also open to writers are the Pets, Psychology and Money/Finance departments. The magazine has a regular columnist for its Technology section; however, Jacobs said, “if there’s something related to teens and technology or parenting and technology, we are open to pitches.”

To hear more about the mag, including editors’ contact details, read: How To Pitch: Family Circle.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Influential Stories on the State of Maine for Down East

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Down East is a magazine all about Maine. The monthly pub aims to highlight what makes the state so special. As editor-in-chief Kathleen Fleury says: “Maine is very diverse in terms of the kinds of people, the lives and places that make up the state.” The mission of the mag, she adds, is to really scour the whole state and “find the stories that communicate what Maine is and share what makes it unique.”

The pub is 50 percent freelance written and editors are looking for writers with a literary touch. Furthermore, high-quality writing and originality are a must. So what kind of content are the editors looking for? Here’s a snippet:

The “Talk of Maine” section, in which the magazine highlights a timely local issue, often with a controversial bent, is [a] spot for freelancers to target. It can be meaty, too. “If someone had a great 3,000- to 4,000-word piece that was about something important in Maine but wasn’t necessarily visual, that would be a great place for it,” Fleury said. “We’ve written articles in this section that have changed legislation in the state. We view it as an important platform.” Word counts vary. Features might range from a short service item on up to 6,000 words.

To hear more about this mag, including what mistakes to avoid when sending in your submission, read: How To Pitch: Down East.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch ‘Buzzy’ Stories for Natural Health‘s Front-of-Book

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Natural Health aims to be the “trusted source for the latest news and trends in integrative medicine and an overall balanced life.” The pub has recently undergone a redesign, complete with a new lifestyle focus, location (offices moved from the West Coast to New York) and editorial staff.

The revamp means there are plenty of opportunities for writers who want to become fixed players in the freelance roster. Pitchable topics include integrative health, natural beauty, fitness, travel and even natural pet-care tips. So which section should freelancers pitch first? The FOB is always a good place to start:

Freelance-friendly sections include the front-of-book’s newsy health stories that highlight something buzzy in the natural-health world. “Spotlight” features a 1,200- to 1,500-word health service piece that’s based on new research or a change in traditional thinking, and there’s also a new one-page pet story that runs every month. There are typically one or two features assigned to freelancers each month (at around 1,800 words), so those are open for pitches, too.

To hear more about this pub, including submission etiquette guidelines, read: How To Pitch: Natural Health.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

This Land Seeks Writers With a Love of Long-Form Journalism

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This Land, a literary magazine based in Tulsa Okla., has a New Yorker-esque vibe. The pub specializes in narrative nonfiction, but it also includes poetry, art and fiction. One of the most distinguishing factors of this semimonthly is its dedication to long-form.

A “short” article in This Land will run around 1,000 words, while the longest piece so far came in at 15,000. Virtually the entire pub is freelance-written, but only exceptional writers need apply. Before sending in your pitch, it’s important to know exactly what editors are looking for:

This Land [is] eager to recruit new writers, particularly in a few target areas, including politics, religion, energy and science. Michael Mason, founder and editor, is also on the hunt for more creative non-fiction. Overall, [the mag] wants a story with impact. Mason pointed to a piece that raised the magazine’s profile early on: “The Nightmare of Dreamland.” The story profiled a founder of Tulsa, Tate Brady, and revealed him to be a Klansman.

To hear more about this pub, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: This Land.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Fit Pregnancy Your Fresh Take on Stories for Moms-to-be

fit-pregnancy-articleAmerican Media launched Fit Pregnancy as the magazine for pregnant readers of sister publication Shape — the woman who cared about maintaining her exercise routine and healthful eating habits.

The bi-monthly mag has since gone through a major transition, moving from the West Coast to the East Coast, adding an entirely new (albeit small) editorial staff and tweaking its mission. “We really want Fit Pregnancy to be the glossy magazine that this woman was reading before she got pregnant, but also for the nine months of pregnancy and beyond,” said deputy editor Andrea Bartz.

The changes bode well for freelancers, as the pub is in need of a fresh stable of writers. Just be sure you have a specific, timely idea before sending in your pitch:

If you’re planning to draft a pitch for Fit Pregnancy that involves a standard, evergreen pregnancy story (like “How to Change Your Workout When You’re Pregnant”), here’s a tip: Save it. “What we’re looking for is something really unique that either is big in the news or a very fresh angle on an aspect of pregnancy, delivery or postnatal care,” said Bartz. ”We’re looking for writers to come to us with something that we haven’t seen before and something that pregnant women haven’t already found online at the Mayo Clinic or other site.”

To hear more about this mag, including submission etiquette, read: How To Pitch: Fit Pregnancy.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

CollegeHumor.com Needs Writers and Illustrators With a Knack for Comedy

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Although some still associate CollegeHumor.com with fratboy jokes and gross-out videos, the site has evolved many times over since its inception in 1999 and is now a pop-culture comedy site for the masses.

There are still plenty of viral videos, but the site also boasts a diverse array of content, from listicles to classic comics to illustrated graphics. CollegeHumor is on the lookout for talented freelancers with solid comedy chops and plenty of fresh ideas:

The site is ideal for comedy writers who aren’t really into performing. It’s the perfect place to pitch your jokes and practice your writing skills. ”[Freelancers] should take advantage of the wide range of content on our site. We have a spot for nearly any sort of [comedic] idea.” says editor-in chief Susanna Wolff. ”And we really like building continued relationships with freelancers.” So if you’ve got even a glimmer of potential, editors will nurture you and encourage you to keep submitting new material.

To hear more about the site, including the various ways to submit your ideas, read: How To Pitch: CollegeHumor.com.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Nashville Lifestyles Seeks Scribes to Write About Life in Music City

nashville-lifestyles-articl

The city of Nashville is all the rage right now. Not only is one of the most popular shows in primetime based in Music City, but some of the biggest names in Hollywood (think Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban) have relocated to this charming town. It’s official: Nashville is having a moment.

That’s where Nashville Lifestyles comes in. This monthly pub has a mix of readers, from longtime residents to recent transplants. The mag is 50 percent freelance written and covers everything that this Southern city has to offer, including the latest in shopping, restaurants, art, books and, of course, music events. Good news for fans of long-form: there are plenty of opportunities to practice your skills in the features well.

The middle of the book is home to the “Style,” “Home” and “Taste” sections, as well as the general feature well, which contains long-form news and human-interest pieces. Recent examples include a profile of a high school that recently launched a record label and an in-depth look at the business and economic impact of the music festival Bonnaroo. And, of course, there’s plenty of room for music artist profiles, along with travel stories, service packages and just about anything else that fits the requirements of being both timely and Nashville-lifestyle-focused. Features generally run 1,500 to 2,500 words, but can go up to 3,000.

To learn more about this mag, including editors’ contact details, read: How To Pitch: Nashville Lifestyles.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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