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Posts Tagged ‘how to pitch’

Draft Seeks Writers to Entertain and Educate Their Readers About Beer Culture

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Draft magazine readers are obviously into beer, but this pub isn’t solely focused on all things lager. Draft has plenty of lifestyle content and illustrates the way beer influences different aspects of life — from adventure travel and sports to food.

It’s also worth noting that this mag’s audience isn’t chugging Bud Light out of a funnel. These beer drinkers are a more sophisticated bunch, pairing beer with their meals and traveling to discover new breweries. And good news for writers — the pub is 50 percent freelance written and plenty of sections are open to pitches:

The front-of-book “On Tap” section features 100- to 600-word roundups, how-tos and small features from new beer releases, cool new bars and trending flavors to the latest mountain bike and tech gadgetry. Writers can [also] pitch the feature well, where stories range from global beer excursions to beer trend investigations to gastropub roundups. Photo-driven features, such as a photo diary of one beer’s inception or a roundup of gorgeous brewery farms, are pitchable, too.

To hear more about the pub, including what not to pitch, read: How To Pitch: Draft.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn Up to $2 a Word at Inc. Magazine

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The pages of Inc. magazine, the publication for entrepreneurs that has been around since 1979, got a makeover this past summer. Although its core content hasn’t changed (features on tech startups, innovation, manufacturing and product design are all still included), the mag has done away with its traditional front-of-the-book and features well. Instead, articles are slotted into one of four sections in the book.

And fortunately for freelancers, just about every section is open to pitches, excluding columns written by entrepreneurs and venture capitalists (unless you happen to be one). Executive editor, Bobbie Gossage, explains one key entry point:

Gossage says the easiest way to break in is with a “Tip Sheet,” the article that starts off every section. It’s a trendy, how-to story usually accompanied by a relevant quiz or a fun sidebar (the Tip Sheet for the “Money” section in the February 2014 issue is about what buyers and sellers need to know about the booming business-for-sale market; for the “Innovate” section, it’s on unlocking creativity in one’s brain and one’s company).

To hear more about this mag, including editors’ contact details, read: How To Pitch: Inc.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Passport Seeks Pitches That Cater to Big-Spending Gay Travelers

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According to Community Marketing, Inc., a firm that specializes in research on gay-and-lesbian spending, LGBT travelers have shelled out $70 billion in the U.S. alone — a fact that Passport magazine’s founders, Don Tuthill and Robert Adams, have capitalized on. The publication’s niche readership, comprised of affluent gay travelers, are unlike your typical globetrotters. Says Adams: “They travel more than the average person and enjoy ‘bragging rights’ — that is, being the first of their circle of friends to visit a destination, be it at home or abroad.”

The pub is 80 percent freelance written and with a small editorial staff and nine issues a year, the editors are always on the lookout for new writers. Passport has an iPad edition and a web-based counterpart, so your story could end up on multiple platforms. Bottom line? Prepare accordingly:

Freelancers are encouraged to pitch ideas that include photos and videos just for a little added multimedia panache. Copy is and has always been king at Passport. “We’re adding new content all the time and welcome feedback from contributors and readers,” says Adams of the suggestions he and his fellow staff get about coverage. “Our articles focus on destinations, both domestic and around the world, so the topics we cover are diverse and exciting.” As with any publication, wannabe contributors should study past issues of the magazine prior to pitching.

For more details on the pub, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Passport.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Women’s Health Seeks Writers With a Fresh Take on Health and Fitness

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Rodale’s Women’s Health was created in 2005 as the female counterpart to Men’s Health. And it didn’t take long for the magazine, with its well-researched, in-depth content, to prove to be a leader in the women’s health-and-fitness category.

The mag is 90 percent freelance written and its editors say they are always open to new writers with a new angle to bring to the table. Freelancers should be aware that a small percentage of pitches are accepted in their original forms. That’s not necessarily a bad thing:

“Very often we’ll help a writer tailor the pitch. They may come to us with a germ of the idea, almost right but not quite right and we might work with them and say ‘Go back, find some more information and convince me why we should do this,’” said [executive editor Lisa Bain.] Still, the best way to get a byline is to pitch a thoughtful and well-researched idea that puts a new twist on a current health or fitness topic.

To hear about the mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Women’s Health.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Ebony.com Editors Want Thought-Provoking Stories on Black Culture

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Ebony.com is so much more than just a spinoff of its print counterpart. The site is an entity in and of itself, filled with original articles on everything from food and fashion to nightlife and news.

The site’s content is 95 percent freelance written, and editors say they’re especially in need of strong op-ed writers with stellar reporting skills to match. So where should a freelancer begin? “News and Views” is a good place to start:

[It] is the most heavily pitched part of the site, and editors work hard to represent black lifestyle in its entirety, both here in the States and abroad. They want layered conversation about the wide swath of topics that go along with that, including race, social justice and all of the -isms. “We’re unabashed about our pro-gay, pro-woman, pro-healthy black people stance. That’s where we are. That doesn’t mean if you’re a black Republican or a self-defined conservative that there’s no place for you here. There absolutely is,” [Kierna Mayo, editorial director] added. “Just have a salient argument and make it timely.”

To hear more about Ebony.com, including the No. 1 mistake to avoid when pitching, read: How To Pitch: Ebony.com

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Land Up to $2.50 a Word at This Mag Dedicated to American Home Design

house-beautiful-feb-2014House Beautiful is on a mission to find gorgeous home design right here in the U.S. The pub caters to a mostly female, affluent audience and editors say they’re always open to new writers with a passion for design and strong reporting skills.

The mag’s content is 50 percent freelance, and almost all sections are ripe for pitching. But where should a writer begin? Executive editor Shax Riegler suggests starting with Q&As.

“We publish five big feature stories a month and four of those are always written by freelancers,” said Riegler. Features vary in length, but most run about 700 to 800 words, plus 100 words for captions. Because the magazine is visually focused, a feature story won’t be assigned without a layout and photos in mind. “The story is driven by what you see in the picture. We don’t like to write about a room we don’t have a picture of because that’s just frustrating for the reader,” said Riegler.

For more information about this Hearst book, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: House Beautiful.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Details.com is on the Lookout for Innovative Writers With Style

details-screenshotDetails.com isn’t your traditional “macho” men’s website with an endless stream of sports, women and beer. No, this digital space is all about modern men’s luxury. So, dudes, if you’re embarrassed about discussing your grooming habits, this site isn’t for you.

The magazine’s digital counterpart (which averages about 1 million uniques a month) is on the hunt for freelancers to enhance its ever-expanding content. So what kind of writing are the editors looking for? Well, it depends on what you bring to the table:

The vast majority of the content on Details.com is presented through 500-word blog posts or slideshows that include a hed, dek, intro and captions. That may seem limiting, but considering the vast coverage of the site ensures that there are plenty of opportunities for freelance bylines. In “Style” and “Advice,” editors are looking for fashion news, not generic how-tos or service pieces. “They tend to be too remedial, and it’s not something that we’re trying to aggregate right now,” says [online director James Cury]. “So you’d want to spot a trend, or anticipate a trend. That would be ideal for us.”

To hear more about what Details.com is looking for, as well as editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Details.com.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn up to $2 a Word at the Newly Revamped Woman’s Day

womans-day-january-2014Woman’s Day magazine has been around for 75 years, so naturally there have been some changes to the format, tone and style of the pub. But since its 2012 redesign, editors say the mag is more focused than ever on adding value to their readers’ lives — whether it be money-saving tips, recipes or health news.

The pub is ready for fresh new writers, and there are plenty of opportunities for freelancers (including contributing to Womansday.com). But remember, it’s important to do your homework before submitting a pitch:

Even with more than seven decades behind its title, this is not your nana’s Woman’s Day. It’s not even the Woman’s Day from five years ago. Freelancers interested in writing for the mag would do themselves a world of favors by getting acquainted with its post-redesign iteration. “A writer who wants to pitch us really needs to have read the past year of issues to know what we’ve covered. That requires a bit of research and knowledge,” says [executive editor Annemarie Conte], who encourages aspiring contributors to do a little legwork. “We’re in 90 percent of libraries in the country. You can find our back issues. There’s no excuse not to know the last 12 months of Woman’s Day.”

To hear more about how to get published in this mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Woman’s Day.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Details is Looking for Writers With a Knack for Witty Cultural Commentary

DetailsDetails magazine is not your average frat-boy pub. You won’t find foldouts of half-naked ladies or advice on how to throw the best kegger. Instead, you’ll find the latest style trends, celebrity interviews and sections on culture, body, tech, travel and more.

So how can a freelancer get his foot in the door at this sophisticated pub? Well, lucky for you, the mag has recently broadened its FOB and is now open to more first-person narratives:

The interests and tastes of the typical Details reader (a “young, successful, urban-dwelling man”) are central to the magazine’s editorial mission, and though Details has been primarily service-oriented in the past, editors have recently begun adding more voice to the magazine through the addition of cultural essays through all sections of the front-of-book. These totally pitchable first-person pieces are rooted in cultural commentary, says [Candice Rainey, deputy editor], but are still “viewed through the lens of Details.”

To hear more about to get published in this mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Details.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Market Yourself as a Freelance Travel Writer

Travel writing careerTravel writing is something many freelancers fantasize about. Getting paid to travel the world and eat amazing food — where do I sign up?

Although it sounds exciting in theory, the reality of life as a travel writer is just as stressful and unglamorous as any other freelance career. In the latest Mediabistro feature, one writer discusses the lessons she’s learned after 10 years in the business. One of the most important ones? Market yourself to death:

Years ago I joined Mediabistro’s Freelance Marketplace, and it paid dividends. Soon after I joined, the editor of an in-flight magazine contacted me via my profile, and I wrote a bi-monthly column for him for four years. I continue to be a member and update my clips regularly. You never know when an editor will be looking for a writer just like you! I also read Mediabistro’s How To Pitch articles. Not only do I look at the travel-specific magazines, but also the lifestyle titles to find out how travel pieces I have in mind might fit into their books. At the end of the day, as with all freelance writing, it’s about being innovative and finding unique perspectives on topics that have already been covered, and making the pitch.

To hear more tips on how to create a lasting travel writing career, read: Embarking On My Greatest Adventure: Freelance Travel Writing.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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