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Posts Tagged ‘Howard Stringer’

Time Warner Names Time Inc. Board

timeinc_logo_2.25.10Time Warner has announced Time Inc.’s board of directors. Once the spinoff from Time Warner is complete — it’s still supposed to happen in the second quarter of this year — Time Inc. CEO Joe Ripp will be chairman.

The rest of the directors are listed below.

  • David Bell, Chairman and CEO, Slipstream Communications, LLC; former co-Chairman and CEO of The Interpublic Group of Companies, Inc.
  • John Fahey, Non-Executive Chairman and former CEO, National Geographic Society
  • Manuel Fernandez, Former Executive Chairman, Sysco Corporation; former Chairman, President and CEO of Gartner, Inc.
  • Dennis FitzSimons, Chairman, Robert R. McCormick Foundation; former Chairman and CEO, Tribune Company
  • Betsy Holden, Senior Advisor, McKinsey & Company LLC; former co-CEO, Kraft Foods, Inc.
  • Kay Koplovitz, Chairman and CEO, Koplovitz & Company LLC; founder and former Chairman and CEO, USA Networks
  • J. Randall MacDonald, CEO, Managing Partner, Windham Mountain Partners; Retired Senior Vice President, Human Resources, IBM
  • Ronald Rolfe, Former Partner, Litigation, Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP
  • Howard Stringer, Former Chairman, President and CEO, Sony Corporation
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Morning Media Newsfeed: Court Torn Over Aereo | Time Inc. Board Revealed | Comcast Gains Soar

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Supreme Court Justices Express Concern Over Scope of Aereo Ruling (TVNewser)
While hearing oral arguments from attorneys representing the broadcast networks and Aereo Tuesday morning, the Supreme Court justices “appeared unsure” how to rule in the case. Reuters Aereo, backed by media mogul Barry Diller’s IAC/InterActiveCorp, could be forced to shut down if the court rules for the companies challenging the startup. A win for Aereo could spur innovation in the television industry by paving the way to new, cheaper ways for consumers to watch shows. A decision is due by the end of June. Bloomberg Hearing arguments Tuesday in Washington, some justices suggested they viewed Aereo as violating broadcaster copyrights by using thousands of dime-sized antennas to get over-the-air signals without paying fees. “There’s no technological reason for you to have 10,000 dime-sized antennas other than to get around the copyright laws?” Chief Justice John Roberts asked. At the same time, the hour-long hearing didn’t clearly indicate the likely outcome, as justices including Stephen Breyer repeatedly asked whether a ruling favoring the broadcasters would imperil the cloud computing business. Variety Some of the justices on Tuesday suggested that they faced a challenge in defining just what Aereo is, and drawing a line on where privately used consumer technology ends and a publicly performing service begins. The Washington Post Aereo argued that its thousands of antennas are essentially rented to subscribers of its $8-a-month service for users to pull programs from the public airwaves legally and then store in Internet server files to watch at their convenience. In that way, it is just a mediator, the company argued, with consumers in control of how they use the company’s antennas and storage files for pulling and recording programs from the airwaves. Most of the arguments, which lasted more than an hour, were focused on the justice’s queries about the definition of public and private performances in copyright law and how Aereo differs from cable, satellite and other Internet video firms that pay broadcasters retransmission and other license fees.

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Giants of Broadcasting Celebrates 10th Anniversary

The Library of American Broadcasting is marking its 10th year of immortalizing industry greats. The 2012 edition of the Giants of Broadcasting include two career radio executives, pioneering television newsmen, a man who made a weekly commentary “must see TV,” and a man who helped launched the 24-hour news cycle.

That man is Ted Turner. He turned an upstart CNN into a worldwide cable news powerhouse. Within six years, CNN was in the black. There were the Atlanta Braves, eventually broadcast on his new station TBS. Turner also added the Atlanta Hawks to his prospectus.

Turner, who spoke briefly in his acceptance speech, talked about his proudest moment professionally in 1990 as the Gulf War began.

“I took a nap. When I woke up, I knew the war was coming, and I knew we had our people there. I turned on the television and clicked it over to NBC and there was Tom Brokaw talking. I switched over to CBS and there was Dan Rather talking in the studio. I switched it over to ABC and there was Peter Jennings talking in the studio,” Turner boasts. “Then I flashed it over to CNN, and there was the war. As a journalist, as a television news person, wasn’t that the greatest scoop of all time?”

Another major TV executive was recognized for his body of work. Sir Howard Stringer (above) had a 30-year association with CBS. The Wales-born Stringer, after earning his B.A. and M.A. degrees at the prestigious Oxford University, arrived in New York. His first job at the Tiffany Network was an entry level clerk logging commercial times at WCBS-TV/Channel 2.

Stringer is chairman of the board at Sony Corporation. FishbowlNY spoke to Stringer at the Giants of Broadcasting event. Watch the video clip after the jump.

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Howard Stringer Still Treasures the Memory of His Lunches with Johnny Carson

What better place for Sir Howard Stringer to reminisce about the great Johnny Carson than the annual Giants of Broadcasting event?

The chairman of Sony’s board was feted at yesterday’s 10th anniversary edition in New York City alongside Norman Lear, Ted Turner, Robert MacNeil, Jim Lehrer, Eric Farber, George Beasley and – posthumously – Don Cornelius and Andy Rooney. Our FishbowlNY colleague Jerry Barmash was able to grab a few minutes with Stringer, who recalled a great fringe benefit of helping orchestrate the successful CBS pursuit of David Letterman:

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Andy Rooney, Don Cornelius, Among 2012 Giants of Broadcasting

An eclectic group of TV and radio pioneers has been selected as Giants of Broadcasting. This year’s class includes the late Don Cornelius, who was the revolutionary Soul Train host from 1971 to 1993.

  • The man who gave Archie Bunker life, Norman Lear , is among the 2012 group. The producer-extraordinaire, Lear was behind some of television’s most endearing sitcoms, including All in the Family, Maude, Sanford and SonGood Times, and One Day at a Time. Lear, who turns 90 on July 27, has won four Emmy Awards and a Peabody Award.
  • Ted Turner brought the idea of 24-hour news to people’s homes, and CNN was born in 1980.  The mogul also founded TNT (Turner Network Television) and TCM (Turner Classic Movies). He was named Time‘s Man of Year for 1991.
  • Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer were the longtime PBS nightly news anchors. They were first to anchor a one-hour newscast in the U.S. and made of career at that rare feat. The MacNeil/Lehrer Report debuted in 1975. Eight years later, the tandem was expanded to 60 minutes. MacNeil, who earlier in his career worked for NBC News, retired in 1995.

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Michael Lynton Set to Become CEO of Sony USA

Sony Pictures Entertainment chairman and CEO Michael Lynton is expected to be named CEO of Sony Corp. of America, according to multiple reports.

In his new role, Lynton will  now oversee Sony’s music division along with the television and movie operations. He’s expected to remain based in Culver City and won’t relocate to the Sony U.S. headquarters in New York City. According to the Financial Times, Lynton’s promotion could become official as early as next week.

Lynton’s promotion is just one of two major moves on the horizon as Kazuo Hirai is succeeding Howard Stringer as chief executive of Sony Corp. on April 1

New Year, New Technology: 3D TV

3d glasses.jpgCould 3D TV be the hot new thing for the New Year?

Hot on the heels of news of ESPN‘s announcement of plans to launch a 3D sports channel in June, Discovery Communications, Sony and IMAX announced a joint venture that would produce the first 24/7 3D television network in 2011.

Discovery, which owns the Discovery Channel and TLC, will provide the network services for the venture, which will offer programming including “natural history, space, exploration, adventure, engineering, science and technology, motion pictures and children’s programming,” the companies said. Both Sony’s CEO Sir Howard Stringer and Discovery’s CEO David Zaslav called the project “groundbreaking.”

It looks like 3D channels are shaping up to become the TV revolution that HD has been for the past few years. More networks are likely to follow. We’ll keep our fingers crossed for Food Network 3D.

Press release after the jump

ESPN to launch 3D network in JuneUSA Today

Related: Former Fox Entertainment Prez Liguori Named COO At Discovery

(Photo via flickr)

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Bart Lauds Sony’s Stringer But Wonders How

Variety Editor Peter Bart unleashes on Sony Corp. chairman Howard Stringer in his column last Fridaystringer2.jpg.

Bart points out that Fox top dog Peter Chernin is about to sign another deal atop News Corp. He notes that 66-year-old Stringer is quietly signing on for three more years. So much for mandatory retirement. He also marvels at Stringer’s ability to continue existence as a non-Japanese Yank-Brit-Welshman.

While Bart wonders how Stringer can maintain, the executive was more than present cutting deals up at Sun Valley with Sony CFO Rob Wiesenthal last July. He seemed to have no intent of retiring, regardless of Bart’s posture.

SAG’s Ad Meant for the Moguls & Murdoch on the Markets

SV20087.jpgDan Cox, on special assignment for FishbowlLA, covering the 2008 Sun Valley Media Conference.

As studio chairmen and agency heads all attempt to escape the jowls of Hollywood and its labor problems, the Screen Actors Guild has a bright marketing executive. SAG bought an full-page ad in the local paper for Sun Valley, the Idaho Mountain Express, that said simply: “We Want a Deal.”

It was aimed at the studio heads up here, including Universal’s Ron Meyer, DreamWorks’ Jeffrey Katzenberg, Sony’s Sir Howard Stringer, Disney’s Robert Iger and agency senior executives like ICM’s Jeff Berg, CAA’s Richard Lovett and Bryan Lourd, UTA’s Jim Berkus and William Morris Agency’s Jim Wiatt.

Unfortunately for SAG, as Sony chairman Stringer told mediabistro: “Unfortunately for the Screen Actors Guild, we don’t see that newspaper up here. It’s not delivered to us.”

Also seen in the valley: IAC chairman and CEO Barry Diller who had to stop riding his bike after almost running into Wendi Deng, wife to billionaire media mogul Rupert.

Murdoch_Deng_7.9.JPG“Where are you going, Wendi,” Diller asks.
“I’m going to get some Yoga pants,” she replies.
“What are yogurt pants?” Diller persists.
“No, yoga pants, you know to do yoga in.”
“Yogurt pants?”

Hubby Rupert was later cornered by an AP reporter who asked about the markets. Murdoch’s simple yet eloquent reply: “I’m a bear.”

The Secret to Sun Valley: “Many of the People We’re Doing Deals With Are Here”

SV2008v.jpgDan Cox, on special assignment for FishbowlLA, covering the 2008 Sun Valley Media Conference.

Sony chairman Sir Howard Stringer and his right-hand man, CFO Rob Wiesenthal were scurrying about the Sun Valley meeting hall early Wednesday.

“We’re making progress with our Blu Ray and DVD deals,” Stringer said. “Our PlayStation Network people are here.”

Stringer_7.9.jpgStringer said he uses Sun Valley to forge ahead with meetings that Sony has underway. “Many of the people we’re doing deals with are here,” he said. “They’re all in one place and accessible.”

Wiesenthal added: “We actually get a lot of work done here. We don’t have any kids.”

But more to the point, Stringer had a request of Wiesenthal as he entered the business center.

“Do they have a USA Today?” Wiesenthal emerged with a USA Today and a Wall Street Journal.

“I don’t need that one,” Stringer said and he handed the Journal off to a nearby journalist.

A few minutes later, former Viacom exec Tom Freston and his wife ran into Susie Buffett, Warren Buffett‘s daughter who runs the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation, named after her mother who passed away in 2004.

Freston was eager to tell Buffett about a trip he’s taking to Rwanda next week.

The elder Buffett, meanwhile, was avoiding reporters as he traipsed about the meeting hall. “I’m ducking out on interviews right now,” he told the Financial Times reporter as he breathlessly walked back into the business center.

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