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Posts Tagged ‘Huffington Post’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Comcast Courts FCC | Kasell to Retire From NPR | CNN’s Primetime Test

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Comcast Points to NBCU Deal to Convince Regulators (Financial Times)
Comcast is trumpeting its compliance with conditions attached to its 2009 acquisition of NBCUniversal as a model for how to convince regulators to approve its $45.2 billion bid for rival cable operator Time Warner Cable. Variety Comcast launched another prong in its strategy, announcing a pledge to continue offering basic broadband for $9.95 per month to low-income families indefinitely. Effectively, the cable giant is spinning the expanded low-cost Internet Essentials program as one of the key benefits of the proposed deal for Time Warner Cable — despite the fact that post-deal, Comcast would control nearly one-third of U.S. broadband market. CNET Comcast started the Internet Essentials program as part of a voluntary commitment it made to the Federal Communications Commission in order to get its merger with NBCUniversal approved. Back then, the company promised to keep the program up and running for three years. Adweek The program provides eligible low-income families with $9.95/month Internet service, an option to purchase a computer for under $150 and multiple options for digital literacy training. In two and a half years, Comcast has signed up 1.2 million low-income Americans or 300,000 families. Internet Essentials dovetails nicely with President Obama’s ConnectED program to increase digital literacy and the FCC’s recent plan to invest an additional $2 billion over the next two years to support broadband in schools and libraries. Bloomberg Comcast executive VP David Cohen will hold meetings at the FCC through Wednesday, said two agency officials knowledgeable about the plans. Comcast, the largest U.S. cable company, needs approval from the FCC and antitrust officials at the Justice Department for its proposed purchase of New York-based Time Warner Cable, the No. 2 carrier. The Time Warner deal would create “appropriate scale” that enables Comcast to invest in new services, and would create a new national advertiser to increase competition in that market, Cohen said.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Oscar Selfie Sets Record | Charter Eyes TWC Subs | FCC Dumps Media Study

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Ellen’s Oscar Selfie Breaks Twitter Record (Variety)
Oscar host Ellen DeGeneres herded Meryl Streep, Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper, Angelina Jolie, Kevin Spacey and others into the most legendary selfie to ever hit the Internet. The sheer number of A-listers packed into the shot apparently caused Twitter to crash, leaving thousands of users locked out. ABC News During the telecast, DeGeneres vowed to set a new record with a photo of her posing with the gaggle of stars sitting in the audience. She had Cooper take the photo, which she captioned, “If only Bradley’s arm was longer. Best photo ever. #oscars” WSJ / Speakeasy The tweet then received more than 921,000 retweets in less than 40 minutes. It went on to get more than a million retweets and counting in less than an hour. The previously most retweeted tweet was one sent by the Twitter account @barackobama when the president won re-election. It simply said, “Four more years.” The Daily Beast The epic selfie needed more than 780,063 retweets to eclipse the iconic victory photo tweeted by Barack Obama in November 2012. It got more than that in just about 35 minutes. AllTwitter By 6 a.m. Monday, the tweet had been retweeted more than 2.3 million times and counting. Indeed, activity around the tweet and the Oscars was so heavy that Twitter experienced a 25-minute slowdown and a full shutdown for some users as the selfie quickly broke the record. Bloomberg Businessweek “We crashed and broke Twitter,” DeGeneres said later from the stage. “We made history.” The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, which presents the awards, took credit for the outage. “Sorry, our bad,” the Academy said on its Twitter account. Variety Unexpected demand for ABC’s live stream of the Oscars telecast over the Internet resulted in the video going down for users across the U.S., the network said Sunday. The live video through the Watch ABC app was “down nationwide due to a traffic overload/greater than expected,” a network rep said in an email. As of 10:45 p.m. ET, the feeds were back up, according to the rep, declining to provide additional information.

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There’s Something About That Cameron Diaz Book…

On December 31, Cameron Diaz published her version of a New Year’s female resolutions manifesto. It’s called The Body Book and boy, has it been fun to read the reactions and reviews that have followed. Just today for example, NOW magazine UK showbiz editor Caroline Millington, via her “My Big Fat Diet Blog,” frames a quote from Diaz about not liking sugar as follows:

Oh, do sod off Cameron Diaz. Her ‘love your body beautiful’, The Body Book, is out now. Bleurgh.

CameronDiazBeforeAfter

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Sanfuentes Out at NBC | Dorsey to Disney Board | AOL’s HuffPost Hopes

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Former D.C. Bureau Chief Leaves NBC News (NY Post)
Antoine Sanfuentes, the former Washington bureau chief for NBC News, is exiting the network. The news was confirmed in a farewell note emailed to staff by Sanfuentes Monday morning. The journalist had been with the Peacock network for 24 years. His last day is Jan. 20, he said in the email, a copy of which was reviewed by The New York Post. HuffPost His exit is the latest shakeup during what has already been a bumpy year for NBC News. Turness took over as president this past summer, and Today and Meet The Press have both struggled in the ratings. NY Post Turness is turning her attention to her troubled Sunday talk show, Meet The Press — asking staff to write a mission statement and explain what works and what doesn’t, the Post has learned. Turness has been reviewing individual shows one by one with the aim of having staff focus more clearly on winning the ratings wars, sources said. FishbowlDC But while Meet The Press has slipped in recent months from a strong first place in the ratings to third, NBC sources close to the matter tell FishbowlDC that scrapping the show — one of NBC’s marquee brands — is not on the table.

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HuffPo Christmas Sweater Tradition Stretched to New Heights

According to Huffington Post lore, the following type of conversation is more than occasionally possible:

Loyal staffer #1: “How many years have you been with the company?”
Loyal staffer #2: “Well, I have four different HuffPo-issued Christmas sweaters…”

Arianna Huffington Christmas Sweater Party

When The Huffington Post first launched, Arianna had to worry about seasonally shopping for just five people. This year, for the first time, her warm and fuzzy gifting crossed into four Yuletide digits.

“At the end of 2012, HuffPost had around 700 employees and all of them received a sweater,” Arianna explains. “This year that number has grown to a little over 1,000 together with fellows and people who touch our daily lives at HuffPost like the janitorial staff, doormen and security.”

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DiCaprio Thanks ‘Drunkest Guy’ for Wolf Pointers

Forget YouTube thumbs-up and total views, although the latter number is about to skyrocket for one particular bit of footage shared by user houstondodgeball and others.

That’s because during a Sunday press conference at the NYC junket for The Wolf of Wall Street, star Leonardo DiCaprio explained that for a very memorable scene of Quaalude debauchery, he took inspiration from the above fall 2009 “Drunkest Guy” YouTube video. Per The Huffington Post’s Christopher Rosen:

“A lot of the research that I did really came from watching that one video, on loop… It’s a man trying to get a beer, but his body doesn’t quite [work]. That was a huge inspiration to me.”

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HuffPost Requires Commenters to Connect Facebook Accounts

From now on, if you want to comment on The Huffington Post, you’re going to need a Facebook account. Anyone who wants to comment anonymously will have to apply for the privilege. Tim McDonald, HuffPost’s director of community, explained how the new system works:

When you log in to your account and go to make a comment, you will be prompted to link your commenting account to your verified Facebook account. Then, choose how you’d like your name to be displayed. You can either display your first and last names, or your first name and last initial.

The change was announced back in August, when Arianna Huffington announced that HuffPost was doing away with anonymous comments because of how harsh and ridiculous they can be. “We need to evolve a platform to meet the needs of the grown-up Internet,” Huffington said at the time.

Commenters are (of course) already expressing outrage.

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Michael Hastings’ Brother Gives Majority of Journalists a Failing Grade

UncouthReflectionsNavIn a recent interview conducted by New York-based journo (and former Newsweek arts reporter) Ray Sawhill, Jonathan Hastings, the brother of late journalist Michael, noted that his problems in the aftermath were not with the LAPD. Rather, they were with many of those who covered the car crash and police investigation:

“If I have any problems, it’s with how the [police] report was written about in the press. There were a lot of journalists-in-quotes who didn’t seem to have read it very carefully or were, irresponsibly I think, taking things out of context.”

“I guess that’s understandable – I mean, of course the press is going to sensationalize things and play up the juicy stuff. But just because it was understandable didn’t mean I liked it.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Globe & Mail Gets It Wrong | Obama Blogs at HuffPost | 60 Minutes & Benghazi

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Globe And Mail Erroneously Claims Ex-NSA Chief Michael Hayden Killed at LAX (TheWrap)
In yet another in a long list of major breaking news errors committed by major news outlets, Canada’s Globe and Mail falsely reported that ex-NSA chief Michael Hayden was killed in Friday’s shooting at Los Angeles International Airport. In a report attributed to “Reuters and Associated Press,” Globe and Mail wrote “LAPD is reporting Ex-NSA chief Michael Hayden has been shot dead at LAX. Radical Christian group has claimed responsibility on its website.” Gawker Canada’s Sun News Network and the BBC both repeated the hoax report without a source, and all have since scrubbed the claim from their sites. The Globe and Mail eventually retracted the report and replaced it with the line “Reports that a former NSA chief was among the victims appear to be a hoax.” It appears the hoax first surfaced on a fake breaking news Twitter account with a single tweet. Poynter John Stackhouse, the Globe and Mail’s editor-in-chief, tells Poynter via phone that the “embarrassing” mistake was an occasion to reiterate the newsroom’s policies for verifying breaking news. “It was an unfortunate human error made by people not following the practices and procedures we have in place,” he said. FishbowlNY The offending Twitter account has now been deleted. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Getting it wrong seems to have become the industry standard. There are apologies, corrections (though not always), and then the next time a gun goes off or a ruling gets made we see the same old mistakes.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Condé Ditches Interns | SpinMedia Cuts Staff | Layoffs at HuffPost

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Condé Nast Discontinuing Internship Program (WWD / Memo Pad) Condé Nast has decided to discontinue its internship program starting in 2014, WWD has learned. The end of the program comes after the publisher was sued this summer by two former interns who claimed they were paid below the minimum wage during internships at W and The New Yorker. The Guardian The pair suing Condé Nast claim the law was breached because the publisher was gaining an advantage from their labor. Lauren Ballinger, who worked at W magazine in 2009, compared her work there unfavorably with Anne Hathaway’s experience in the film The Devil Wears Prada, after she spent days packing accessories for editors. The other, Matthew Leib, said he was paid between $300 and $500 for the two summers he worked for the New Yorker‘s cartoon archives. FishbowlNY Condé isn’t the only media company brought to court over failing to pay interns. Gawker, Fox Searchlight and Hearst have all been sued for the same reason. The difference is that Condé has now taken the bold step of eliminating the issue completely. If you have no interns, there’s no way to get sued for not paying them. Gawker The media class comprises thousands of former unpaid interns, so you’re going to hear a lot about how their internships were so valuable, so demanding yet fulfilling — look at them now! — that they just can’t believe Condé would do such a thing. Gosh, kill their internship program! You’d think the company, and maybe the entire media industry, was closing down for good. BuzzFeed / Politics While the end of Condé Nast’s sought-after internship program might irk some job-seekers looking for a way into the media’s biggest names, advocates fighting to get interns paid say the elimination of internships at the company signals that there will be better opportunities for job seekers down the road.

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