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Posts Tagged ‘Humphrey Bogart’

Here’s Looking at the Humphrey Bogart Film Festival

For classic film fans, there are many reasons to want to be in Key Largo, Florida this weekend following the close of TCM’s latest local celebration. Starting with the following Saturday May 4 lunchtime event:

Join Stephen Bogart and Leonard Maltin as they discuss the life and career of Humphrey Bogart. Topics will include Bogie’s breakout performances, Bogie’s signature acting style, discussion of stories behind some of the memorabilia items and the experience of growing up with Bogie and Bacall.

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Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Critic Lets Loose with Rip-Roaring (Nicolas) Cage Match

There’s a wonderful essay in the February 2011 issue of GQ Magazine by Tom Carson. Titled “National Treasure”, it tackles the amorphous legacy of actor Nicolas Cage. Or, as the sub-headline more aptly puts it: “As Drive Angry arrives in theaters, the question must be asked: Can anything explain the lunatic career of Nicolas Cage?”

This is just flat out great writing. From the opening sentence referencing Xanax to the closing challenge of naming a truly boring Cage movie, Carson careens through the actor’s career at a gonzo pace in keeping with his manic subject’s on-screen demeanor. It’s tough to pick a favorite paragraph, as there are so many. But here’s one highlight:

Actors clutching a new Oscar acquire not only artistic clout but market value; the question is which bent they’ll indulge. Cage zeroed in on the second with a single-mindedness exceeded only by Denzel Washington‘s treatment of dumb thrillers as acting sinecures.

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