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Posts Tagged ‘Ian Shapira’

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TVNewser: Katie Couric was among those honored at the duPont Awards at Columbia University last night.

Guardian: About 40 people have taken voluntary buyouts and are leaving Guardian News & Media.

The Business Insider: Former Fishbowl-er Rachel Sklar denied she’s leaving Mediaite, but she may…some day.

CNN: An unauthorized biography of Oprah Winfrey is due out later this year.

Washington Post: Ian Shapira critiques a Vanity Fair article about Kentucky’s Creation Museum. Defending his home state, Shapira said, “Vanity Fair took the cliched route, pointing a huge rifle inside a small bowl full of wriggling fish. The reporter relied on snark rather than a more deeply reported exploration of the museum and, more important, of the lives and mindsets of visitors there.”

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WaPo Writer’s Gawker Experience Raises Questions Of Fair Use

wapo.pngWe feel a bit guilty blogging about this right now, fearing that it will just add fuel to the fire raging over blogs (like this one) that draw information and quotes from stories in news sources like The Washington Post. But thanks to an article in the Post this weekend, the wound is open and raw, so we have to at least let you know what’s been going on.

Yesterday, Post writer Ian Shapira wrote about his experience when Gawker picked up an article he wrote for the paper early last month about a business coach who explains millennials to baby boomers. At first, Shapira was excited by Gawker’s take on his article. “I confess to feeling a bit triumphant…I was flattered,” he wrote.

Then, an email from his editor changed his mind: “But when I told my editor, he wrote back: They stole your story. Where’s your outrage, man?”

Shapira goes on to discuss the amount of work that went into his 1,500-word story that, although not “Pulitzer material” still required hours of travel, interviews, note-taking, transcribing and writing. You know, all the work that goes into any piece of journalism that is not merely a rehashing of someone else’s story. Was it fair of Gawker to rip the story from the pages of the Post and steal Shapira’s thunder? Right or wrong, it’s become common practice on news blogs.

And so, the debate continues.

Updated with Gawker’s reply. Read on.

Read more

WaPo Journo Writes About Future of Newspapers After Being Lifted by Gawker

newspaper-reporting-101-mrr-ebook-cover.jpgLast month, Ian Shapira did a story about Millennials and it was picked up by Hamilton Nolan at Gawker. Shapira’s story was “stolen” – eight paragraphs used with a link but little attribution to to original reporter.

Shapira penned a piece titled “The Death of Journalism (Gawker Edition)“. It details all the work that went into gathering information about the story. In it Shapira brings up some interesting points about the downfall of news reporting.

Well sum up: remember the story about Henny Penny? The chicken who does all the work and then once it’s done all her blogger friends show up and want to eat the bread she’s made? It’s like that only in the story she’s makes them all go away and enjoys her bread herself. In reality, after hours of tedious and expensive news gathering the other farm animals eat the bread and Henny Penny works harder and gets thinner and thinner…

Shapira writes:

Marburger compared my article and the Gawker posting and concluded: “This is what in our opinion is a huge contributor to the demise of those who are originating news reports. If you don’t change the law to stop this, originators of news reports cannot survive.”

Whole piece here.