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Posts Tagged ‘James Bond’

Atrocious James Bond FIFA Headline Goes Viral

Eight hours ago, northeast UK resident Ross Loraine tweeted the following:

RossLoraineBondHeadline

Thanks to Loraine, this #epicfail has since been furiously passed around the Twittersphere as well as picked up by various newspapers and blogs.

The article is from the Times of India. The online version, wisely, currently displays some much more palatable “Licence to Thrill” wordplay in reference to James Rodriguez, the star of Colombia’s FIFA World Cup 2-0 victory over Uruguay. Above a strong lede paragraph:

There, you have your Colombian James Bond now. Born in Cucuta in 1991, far removed from Ian Fleming’s world and time, the boy James Rodriguez was named after the fictional secret agent by excited parents Wilson and Maria, who probably never thought he would have the World Cup in Brazil ‘shaken and stirred’ a little more than two decades later.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Pulitzers Announced | Google Buys Drone Maker | Relativity Eyes Maker Studios

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2014 Pulitzer Prizes Announced (FishbowlNY)
The Pulitzer Prizes celebrate the best of the best, and Monday we learned the latest recipients of journalism’s highest honor. TVNewser The Washington Post and the U.S. edition of The Guardian have won the award. They will share the Public Service award for their series of stories on NSA surveillance, as revealed by Edward Snowden, an NSA contractor who gave the top-secret information to the news organizations. The Pulitzer committee said the journalism was “marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security.” Politico Snowden immediately declared the decision “a vindication.” The reporting on the former government contractor’s leaks was led by journalists Glenn Greenwald and Ewan McAskill at The Guardian, Barton Gellman at the Post, and Laura Poitras, who worked with both newspapers. NYT The Boston Globe won the breaking news prize for its coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing, which killed three people and wounded at least 260. The Post won a second award, for explanatory journalism. Eli Saslow, 31, a staff writer, won for a series of articles on American families that rely on the federal food stamp program. GalleyCat Author Donna Tartt won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for her book The Goldfinch. The novel about an orphan also won Amazon’s Best Books of the Month “Spotlight Pick” in October 2013 and was shortlisted for 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: AP Journalists Shot | Schultz’s Legal Woes | Blade Sues U.S. Gov’t

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AP Photographer Killed, Reporter Wounded in Afghanistan (The Associated Press)
An Afghan police commander opened fire Friday on two Associated Press journalists, killing Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Anja Niedringhaus and wounding veteran correspondent Kathy Gannon — the first known case of a security insider attacking journalists in Afghanistan. FishbowlNY Niedringhaus and Gannon were covering the nation’s election when a policeman opened fire on their vehicle. Niedringhaus was killed instantly and Gannon was shot twice and later underwent surgery. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Niedringhaus and Gannon were traveling in a convoy of election workers delivering ballots from the center of Khost city to the outskirts, in Tani district, protected by the Afghan National Army and Afghan police. As they were sitting in the car waiting for the convoy to move, a unit commander named Naqibullah walked up to the car, yelled “Allahu Akbar” — God is Great — and opened fire on them in the back seat with his AK-47. He then surrendered to the other police and was arrested. BBC News The attack came as Afghanistan intensified security ahead of presidential elections on Saturday, in response to threats of violence by the Taliban. The new president will succeed Hamid Karzai, who has been in power since the 2001 fall of the Taliban but is constitutionally barred from seeking a third consecutive term. The run-up to this historic election had already been the bloodiest, and fears of electoral fraud are pronounced. NYT Niedringhaus, a German citizen who was based in Geneva, first came to Afghanistan after joining the AP in 2002, and she quickly formed a partnership with Gannon. They were among a band of female photographers and correspondents who persevered through many years of conflict in Iraq as well as in Afghanistan. In the process, they helped redefine traditional notions of war reporting. Even as they covered the battlefield, they also focused attention on the human impact of conflicts known for their random, unpredictable violence against civilians.

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The Name of this Q&A is Bond… James, Bond

SoloBookCoverTo promote his new Bond series novel Solo, author William Boyd was granted some delightful space over the weekend in The Guardian. The newspaper published Boyd’s imagined encounter with Bond in 1969-era London as well as a sidebar Q&A.

In the former, Boyd heads to a Chelsea address and ponders, upon first encountering the 45-year-old licensed killer, whether 007 does indeed resemble American singer Hoagy Carmichael. In the latter, Bond answers a number of intriguing questions, including:

Who would play you in the film of your life?

A combination of Tyrone Power and Errol Flynn.

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James Bond Composer John Barry Dead at 77

John Barry, the man who probably did more to make James Bond a household name than Sean Connery, died in New York yesterday at the age of 77. Barry was the musician behind the scores of a dozen Bond films, including “Goldfinger.” He picked up five Oscars over the course of his more than 40-year career, for films like “Out of Africa” (1985) and “Dances with Wolves” (1990). His compositions were often way better than the movies they were in. The piece above is from the otherwise forgettable 1979 film “Black Hole.” The LA TimesRandall Roberts compiled a Youtube list of some of Barry’s other great works.

Parent Turning MGM Into A Studio — What Gives?

Mary Parent.jpg
Former Universal Studios film maven Mary Parent is transforming MGM into a real studio, just a few years after Sony acquired it but made it look like it was putting it to death.

Parent, a former New Line Cinema executive and then Universal Film president and then a producer, has been doing it in baby steps.
Most recently, she just bought an action film, “Wardogs,” with “Get Smart” director Peter Segal attached to direct.

MGM, which still relies heavily on another action figure (called James Bond) may be looking to tap into the ever-burgeoning foreign markets. It turns out Mary Parent is actually turning into a Parent with a little MGM waiting to grow.

Times‘ News Corp. China Plot Sounds Suspiciously Familiar To 007 Fans

007_tnd_062607.jpgToday’s Times piece on Murdoch’s China:

Many big companies have sought to break into the Chinese market over the past two decades, but few of them have been as ardent and unrelenting as Rupert Murdoch‘s News Corporation. Mr. Murdoch has flattered Communist Party leaders and done business with their children. His Fox News network helped China’s leading state broadcaster develop a news Web site. He joined hands with the Communist Youth League, a power base in the ruling party, in a risky television venture, his China managers and advisers say. Mr. Murdoch’s third wife, Wendi, is a mainland Chinese who once worked for his Hong Kong-based satellite broadcaster, Star TV. … Regulatory barriers and management missteps have thwarted Mr. Murdoch’s hopes of big profits in China. He has said his local business hit a “brick wall” after a bid to corral prime-time broadcasting rights fell apart in 2005, costing him tens of millions of dollars.

Plot summary for 1997′s Tommorow Never Dies, starring Pierce Brosnan:

Elliot Carver (Pryce) wants to complete his global media empire, but in order for this to work., he must achieve broadcasting rights in China. Carver wants to to start up World War III by starting a confrontation over British and Chinese waters. Bond gains the helping of Wai Lin (Yeoh) on his quest to stop him, but how will Bond feel when he meets up with his former lover, who is know Carver’s wife. … Megalomaniac media mogul Elliot Carver only needs broadcasting rights in China to complete his global communications empire. The Chinese, however, are proving stubborn, so he hatches a diabolical plan to thwart the Chinese by the simple means of starting a war between them and the British. When a British warship is sunk in Chinese waters and its deadly payload stolen, James Bond embarks on a dangerous mission against the clock to discover the truth. The Chinese also want to know what is happening and dispatch their own agent, Wai Lin, who proves to be a match for James Bond!

EARLIER:

  • News Corp. Responds To ‘Murdochracy’ Exposé
  • Sia Michel To Rock Times

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    Sia Michel, friend of 50 Cent and one-time Spin editor ousted during the magazine’s sale last year, is joining the New York Times as pop music editor. The internal memo via Gawker:

    Sia Michel Joins Culture

    The departure of Tom Kuntz to the Week in Review created an opening in culture. I am pleased to report that Sia Michel will fill it, joining The Times as pop music editor. Sam Sifton introduces the newest addition to Culture.

    Sia brings to The Times both the gifts of a writer and the strategic perspective of an editor. She has been laboring in the fields of freelance journalism for the past year, writing often and well for The Times, as both a critic and profilist.

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    Obi-Wan’s Robe Sold! Light-Sabre Not Included

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    Bonham’s costume auction in London saw a brown hooded robe go for $104,000. Worn by Alec Guiness as Obi-Wan Kenobi in the Star Wars films, the cloak was forgotten for years in a warehouse. Two anonymous telephone bidders duked it out for the costume.

    The James Bond dinner jacket from Thunderball went for $64,700 and a beaten metal helmet worn by Terry Jones in Monty Python and the Holy Grail sold for $19,300, 20 times more than its pre-sale estimate.