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Posts Tagged ‘Jane Mayer’

Elizabeth Vargas, Harold Ford and the Latest on The Matrix Awards

Lunch At MichaelsI was joined today by Liz Kaplow, president and CEO of the eponymous marketing communications firm she started in 1991. Kaplow’s client list is full of industry leaders, including Target, Unilever, Timex, CVS and Laura Mercier. I’ve known Liz forever and seen her in this very dining room presiding over many a power lunch — the last time with Microsoft executives who were meeting with her to talk about the latest technological innovations from Skype, another client. We chatted briefly that day and realizing we’d never had a proper sit down, decided then and there to make a date. So here we are. In preparing for our lunch, I did a quick read through of Kaplow’s website and was blown away by the awards and accolades that Liz and her team have collected recently. The New York Observer ranked Kaplow No. 13 on their inaugural PR Power List last year. Kaplow’s “Branded Journalism” program with Skype was named one of the top global PR campaigns of 2013 by The Holmes Report (which also named Kaplow Consumer Agency of the Year in 2011). And to think all this started because, Liz told me, “I wanted to have more flexibility to be with my kids” when her two daughters were growing up.

Liz Kaplow and Diane Clehane

Liz Kaplow and Diane Clehane

Liz opened her own agency in 1991 with the costume jewelry company Monet as her first client and quickly added to that list with forward-thinking strategic planning. By the mid-90s, Kaplow ventured into the technology sector with iVillage as a client. “We didn’t have the technical background, but we understood women and how to reach that consumer — we won the business while we were in the room doing the pitch.” Over the past two decades, Liz has become one of the most respected women in PR and is known for her approach in developing and executing marketing and public relations campaigns across all platforms that connect her clients’ brands with consumers through, as she likes to say, “the art of storytelling.” As she explained it: “Every brand has a different story to tell and today they want to tell it through all different platforms.” With that as a guiding principal, Kaplow has focused on integrating social media and emerging technologies with well-established media platforms to ensure clients’ get the maximum impact from their PR campaigns. “PR has to be much more holistic today,” she told me. “Traditional print media is still very, very important as a third party and ‘earned’ versus ‘paid’ media. Clients say the power of influence comes in very different ways. There is not a one-size-fits-all strategy. Every client needs a customized approach.”

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Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

ASME Says Criticism of Nominations is ‘Kind of Silly’

Yesterday, when FishbowlNY covered the 2012 National Magazine Award finalists, we expected the typical backlash against the major publishing houses and our fine city. While there was some of that, many people took the ASME to task for the noticeable lack of women writers.

As Ann Friedman — the Executive Editor of GOOD noted, “Women hold their own or dominate in servicey categories (public interest, personal service) and fiction. They are not represented at all in the categories of reporting, feature writing, profile writing, essays and criticism, columns and commentary.” Alyssa Rosenberg, writing for Think Progress, added that the “women’s” category ends up hurting female writers:

The division in General Excellence creates an incentive for women’s magazines to genuinely specialize their coverage across the board, while men’s magazines have incentives to commission features and criticism that compete with publications like the New Yorker and The Atlantic.

Sid Holt, the ASME’s Chief Executive, brushed off the criticism. He wrote to Poynter and said it was all “Kind of silly,” went through the selection process and cited past nominations as proof that there is no bias:

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The New Yorker Chooses 9/11 for First e-Book

We’re not quite sure how much of an audience there is for e-books, but The New Yorker is certainly grabbing some attention with its first venture into the territory. The Cutline reports that the magazine’s first e-book — titled After 9/11 — will center on 9/11, and features writing that will make it attractive to readers:

[The book] includes vignettes from the magazine’s trademark ‘Talk of the Town’ section by Hendrik Hertzberg, John Updike, Jonathan Franzen, Susan Sontag, Calvin Trillin and George Packer; deeply reported features by Adam Gopnik, Seymour Hersh, Jane Mayer, Jon Lee Anderson and Steve Coll; criticism by Malcolm Gladwell; and fiction by Don DeLillo. It also includes Nicholas Schmidles recent account of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

The New Yorker’s Deputy Editor, Pam McCarthy, said that if the book is successful, the magazine will look to do more.

After 9/11 is available for $7.99 on the Kindle or Nook.

The Jill Abramson Piece Extravaganza Has Begun

Now that Jill Abramson is the Executive Editor of The New York Times, we can all expect about 1,734 profiles about her to be written in the next couple of weeks. Today alone three pieces about Abramson were posted, so let’s take a look, shall we?

WWD discusses how Abramson’s management style – bold and passionate – is different than the methods that were used by Bill Keller, and whether that will be a good thing for the paper. FishbowlNY doesn’t understand how caring can be a bad thing, but the people quoted in the piece seem unsure about that:

‘With Jill, it’s more about her,’ said one senior editor at the Times, who requested anonymity. ‘When Bill is in the room, he sits there quietly.’

‘Jill has always been more tense than Bill and that makes other people tense,’ said the senior newsroom source. ‘She needs to rise above that a bit and have the calmness of a great leader.’

Bottom Line: Abramson is fiery and that might cause some tension in the newsroom, but maybe that’s a good thing.

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National Magazine Awards Roundup: New York, National Geographic Among the Big Winners

Last night’s ASME National Magazine Awards had more than a few surprises. The evening began with a cocktail hour for a change, where FishbowlNY had drinks with Graydon Carter, Bethenny Frankel, David Copperfield, and other media celebrities milling around the red carpet. We caught up with a few nominees, such as the editor of Audobon magazine: “We’ve been nominated for 5 years,” he told us, “and we haven’t won once. I wasn’t going to attend, but then I thought, what if we win this year?”

They didn’t. Oh, well! Some other choice quotes: we heard from Bethenny Frankel that she always reads her magazine coverage in nail salons, because she is medicated on planes.

The evening began on a somber note, with Graydon Carter acknowledging the many journalists who had died or been detained while reporting in war areas, and presenting a slideshow of the work of Vanity Fair contributor Tim Hetherington, who died in Misrata, Libya.

But the mood lightened as the awards were announced. Some of the big winners of the night were New York Times Magazine, New York, and National Geographic, each taking home a couple of awards, with National Geographic jubilantly winning “Magazine of the Year.”

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Dave Remnick, Stefano Tonchi, and Josh Tyrangiel on the National Magazine Award Nominations

Yesterday the American Society of Magazine Editors announced the nominations for the 2011 National Magazine awards. The New Yorker led the pack with nine nominations, followed by New York magazine, The New York Times Magazine, and the Virginia Quarterly Review (all with six nominations), causing some to speculate as to whether having “New York” in your title guaranteed a certain amount of success.

New Yorker editor Dave Remnick spoke to WWD about whether or not Jane Mayer‘s profile on the Koch brothers could beat Michael Hastings‘ profile of Stanley McChrystal. “Cassius Clay beat Sonny Liston, right? Princeton beat UCLA,” he said. “Anything can happen.”

W editor Stefano Tonchi also told WWD that he was particularly gratified that W received three nominations, because — due to his recent relaunch — the magazine “only submitted what [it] had — that was September, October, November.”

“I would never, ever, ever anticipate that your own estimation of your work equals a certain number of nominations,” said Bloomberg Businessweek editor Josh Tyrangiel, “unless you’re Adam Moss and David Remnick, who are generally always right about that.”

The New Yorker Leads in 2011 National Magazine Awards Nominations

Sid Holt, Chief Executive of the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME), announced the finalists for the 2011 National Magazine Awards this morning.

Some highlights:

  • The New Yorker leads with nine total nominations. Here are the other magazines receiving multiple nominations:

The Atlantic (4 nominations), Esquire (3), GQ (5), Harper’s Magazine (2), Los Angeles (3), Martha Stewart Living (2), Men’s Journal (2), National Geographic (4), New York (6), The New York Times Magazine (6), The Paris Review (2), Real Simple (3), Scientific American (2), Texas Monthly (2), TIME (2), Vanity Fair (2), Virginia Quarterly Review (6), W (3) and Wired (3). The six never-before-nominated titles are Cooking Light, House Beautiful, Lapham’s Quarterly, OnEarth, The Sun and Women’s Health.

  • The 2011 finalists include Michael Hastings’ ‘The Runaway General,’ which led to the resignation of Stanley McChrystal, and Jane Mayer’s ‘Covert Operations,’ on the billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch.
  • The Awards will include the presentation of the Creative Excellence Award to Tom Wolfe.
  • Bonus: intriguingly, ASME puts women’s magazines (e.g., Women’s Health, Essence) in the “Fashion, Service and Lifestyle Magazines” category, but puts men’s magazines (e.g., GQ) in the “Finance, Technology and Lifestyle Magazines” category.

Is Obama Playing Media Favorites?

url.jpgA line slipped in near the end of Mike Allen‘s Politico article about the media coverage of Barack Obama‘s overseas trip, is making some waves. Per Allen: “Among those for whom there was no room was Ryan Lizza, Washington correspondent of The New Yorker. The campaign, which was furious about the magazine’s satirical cover this week, cited space constraints in turning him away.” (Hmm, sort of like the time John McCain neglected to invite the NYT to his health records viewing party.) Over at Eat the Press Rachel Sklar says the decision “sends a clear — and worrisome — signal from the Obama campaign: If we don’t like it, man, will you know it.” A decision, she points out, which merely reinforces a quote made in Lizza’s (amazingly researched, though not terribly flattering) article : “[Obama] earned a reputation that “‘you’re not going to punk me, you’re not going to roll me over, you’re not going to jam me.’”

It should be noted The New Yorker was not the only one cut out of the “Trip of the Century”; 200 people applied and only 40 were allocated spots. That said, The New Yorker is hardly your average magazine. As Gawker’s Ryan Tate points out,

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