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Posts Tagged ‘Jason Ungate’

Amazon Studios Adds Celebrity Voiceovers

Quietly, Amazon Studios has been rewriting the rules of screenplay competitions. They have introduced a lot of innovative elements to the process, including the ability of competitors to voice a scene from their script.

To publicize that element of the operation, Amazon recently went ahead and enlisted the services of a quartet of Hollywood celebs for “Star Tracks,” an A-list version of the same said service. Lending their talents to the proceedings are Fred Armisen, Jeffrey Tambor, Tricia Helfer, and Alison Pill.

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LA Director Connects via Amazon Studios for $10,000 Win

Amazon Studios, the much ballyhooed movie development arm of Amazon.com, today announced the winners of its January contests. Among that group is Playa Vista based director Christian Davis, who landed $10,000 for a two-hour video recording that was judged Best Table Read.

The 43-year-old Davis connected via the service with 38-year-old Malboro, VT screenwriter Alex Greenfield, author of Memory, a thriller loglined as “Memento meets Se7en.” It’s the story of a former homicide investigator with a photographic memory who revisits his most traumatic case.

Davis got some actor friends together and shot the table read in about three hours. A few more hours of editing, and it was done… “Right now, I’m concentrating on the development of Memory,” he said. “I really think this script has a solid, commercial premise. I’ve never seen a hero like Nick. I’m especially excited to explore the visual potential of the script as the test movie develops.”

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