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Posts Tagged ‘Jay Babcock’

Local Journo Makes Appearance in Mike Mills’s Beginners

Jay Babcock, founding editor of Arthur magazine and longtime SoCal journalist, can be spotted in Mike Mills‘s latest film, Beginners. Babcock, who currently resides in Joshua Tree, even got a shout out from Mills on the Focus Features website:

To me the river is the heart of any city, but people don’t think that LA has a river. But my great friend Jay Babcock, who did Arthur magazine, showed me how you walk over the 5 Freeway and right there is the Glendale Narrows. Most of LA River is paved but that part, the bottom isn’t paved, and it has become this accidental wildlife corridor.

In the film still below, Babcock is the fellow in the hat.

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Arthur Magazine Is No More

Despite founding editor Jay Babcock‘s repeated attempts to resuscitate the magazine, Arthur has seen his last days. Wrote Babcock late last week:

After years of service, Arthur departed the material plane today.

He died as he lived—free, high and a-dreaming of love, ‘neath vultures’ terrible gaze.

Thank you, and love to all.

Babcock spoke to the Portland Mercury about his mag’s demise.

[W]ithout a partner, I can’t do Arthur beyond a blog/Twitter/Facebook, which receives very little income, doesn’t pay for itself, and is extremely ungratifying and unrewarding for both me and for the readers, relative to what Arthur was. I could see doing that for a while—but indefinitely? Year after year? No. I gave it two years. It’s time to let it end.

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Arthur Magazine Looking for a New Partner*

Arthur magazine hasn’t put out a print issue since December of 2008, a few months after editor/founder Jay Babcock rather famously quit LA for the greener creative business pastures of Brooklyn. Not surprisingly to this Fishie, who lived in Brooklyn for a couple of years, Babcock’s tenure in New York didn’t last long. He’s been back on the West Coast for nearly a year and just wrote to let us know he’s still looking to get Arthur’s print edition back up and running. All he needs is a little help.

Although I’ve been able to clean up almost all of Arthur’s debt (magic works!), I still do not have the logistical means to resume print publication. Arthur needs a West Coast-based someone to handle its business affairs—that is, a publisher/co-owner—cuz I sure can’t do everything myself. It’s a challenging gig, fer shure, but… Know anyone?

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‘The Situation Can’t Be Unf*cked’

arthur_mag_dead.jpgArthur magazine, the five-year-old neo-music rag found free in the entrances of the city’s hipster haunts like Other Music, is dead. The reason? A dispute between the magazine’s founding editor, Jay Babcock, and founding publisher Laris Kreslins.

Babcock has been trying to buy out Kreslins for a year. Talks broke down Thursday, and production on the magazine’s next issue (which was to have a cover article on Yoko Ono co-written by Thurston Moore) was halted.

Kreslins announced the decision yesterday on the Arthur magazine blog:

As of Friday, Feb. 23rd, Arthur Magazine is on indefinite hiatus. We at Lime Publishing, the current publisher, had been working toward transitioning operations to a new publisher since the start of the year. A breakdown this past week in negotiations for the future of the magazine led to an unfortunate and perplexing announcement that “Arthur is Dead.” This poorly-timed message was sent out, against explicit wishes of Lime Publishing, to the public before the staff, advertisers or contributors were notified.

“The magazine can’t be restarted,” Babcock told the Village Voice. “It’s a done deal. It’s dead. The situation can’t be unfucked.”