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Posts Tagged ‘Jay Rosen’

Greenwald Venture Gets a Name: First Look Media

PMO Headshot Studio_Michele ClementIt doesn’t get much better these media days than a billionaire backer and a Honolulu dateline. NUY prof Jay Rosen posted today that the Glenn Grennwald-Pierre Omidyar (pictured) venture that he is now also a part of will be called First Look Media:

First Look Media is made up of several entities, including a company established to develop new media technology and a separate nonprofit journalism organization. The journalism operation, which will be incorporated as a 501(c)(3), will enjoy editorial independence, and any profits eventually earned by the technology company are committed to support First Look’s mission of independent journalism. The name of First Look Media’s initial digital publication is yet to be announced.

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Friends, Colleagues Remember New York Observer Editor Peter Kaplan

As the sad news of the passing at age 59 from cancer of Peter Kaplan spread Friday, current Observer senior editor Colin Campbell suggested “there’s no better source on Mr. Kaplan than the editor himself.” And so, Campbell for his first piece chose to republish Kaplan’s 2008 tribute to New York magazine founder Clay Felker.

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BuzzFeed’s Doree Shafrir meanwhile led off her memories with what she deemed a typically “quirky” Kaplan hiring experience:

In July 2007, when I was a writer for Gawker, I got an email from Nikki Finke that said in the subject line: “Peter Kaplan called and asked who to hire as his media writer/editor. I said you.” And so a few days later I got coffee with Peter at Le Pain Quotidien on 19th Street between Park and Broadway, just down the block from the old Observer offices, and a few weeks later, after several back-and-forths about what the job was (I was to be writing about “ideas”) and how much money I would be making (not very much), I was hired.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Alec Baldwin Suspended | Jay Rosen Joins NewCo | Doris Lessing Dead at 94

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MSNBC Suspends Alec Baldwin’s Up Late for Two Weeks (TVNewser)
MSNBC has suspended Alec Baldwin after he called a photographer a “c**ksucking f*g.” His outburst has been criticized as homophobic and anti-gay. In a statement posted on MSNBC.com, Baldwin apologized for his remarks. NYT He wrote: “I did not intend to hurt or offend anyone with my choice of words, but clearly I have — and for that I am deeply sorry. Words are important. I understand that, and will choose mine with great care going forward. What I said and did this week, as I was trying to protect my family, was offensive and unacceptable. Behavior like this undermines hard-fought rights that I vigorously support.” Capital New York Up Late has only been on the channel for a month, so a two-week hiatus is significant. The former 30 Rock actor has a history of public outbursts, but said before his MSNBC program began that the channel knew what it was getting into when it hired him. HuffPost Baldwin: “Whether the show comes back at all is at issue right now. My producers and I had a very enlightening and well-researched program prepared to air on Nov. 22 itself, dealing with John Kennedy’s assassination. That show is off the air now. I am deeply apologetic to Ron Fried, who worked extremely hard with me on that show.” TheWrap Baldwin came under fire from CNN newsman Anderson Cooper, who accused Baldwin of making “ridiculous” excuses. “Wow, Alec Baldwin shows his true colors yet again,” Cooper wrote Friday. “How is he going to lie and excuse his anti-gay slurs this time?” TVSpy Robert Moses, reporter for New York Fox-owned station WNYW was confronted and threatened by Baldwin Friday morning. TVSpy Hours after confronting Moses, Baldwin continued his terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day, this time accusing WNYW reporter Linda Schmidt of hitting his wife in the face with a mic.

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Jay Rosen Gets More Details About Glenn Greenwald Venture

For Glenn Greenwald‘s quickly revealed billionaire backer Pierre Omidyar, it started in Honolulu and continued in Washington D.C.

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In a telephone conversation with NYU prof and journalism seer Jay Rosen, Omidyar explained how his experiences with the website Honolulu Civil Beat led to a failed attempt to buy WaPo and a successful attempt to commit to the next (other) big thing:

Omidyar said that his involvement in Civil Beat whetted his appetite to do something larger in news. “I have always been of the opinion that the right kind of journalism is a critical part of our democracy.” He said he had watched closely over the last 15 years as the business model in journalism collapsed but had not “found a way to engage directly.”

But then when the idea of buying the Washington Post came up he started to think about it more seriously. “It brings together some of my interests in civic engagement and building conversations and of course technology, but in a very creative way.”

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Everyone Loves Margaret Sullivan

We think Margaret Sullivan, the New York Times’ public editor, is great. In The Nation’s new profile of her, that sentiment gets echoed. Over and over again. In fact, Sullivan might be the most beloved person in media right now. Think we’re crazy? Maybe we are. Or maybe we’re so sane we just blew your mind. See below for some Sullivan love from The Nation’s piece.

Greg Mitchell, author of the profile:

Sullivan, on the other hand [compared to previous public editors], is able to cover so much, so often, because unlike her predecessors, she has used her blog at the paper’s main website regularly—making good on one of her first promises to readers after taking the job.

Jay Rosen:

What strikes me is that she’s determined to participate in the online conversation about the Times and its brand of journalism. The previous public editors did not see this as important. One result: she is on top of things a lot more quickly.

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New York Times Public Editor is a Fan of Facts

Arthur Brisbane, the New York Times’ public editor who wackily questioned if the paper should publish facts, has moved on. Margaret Sullivan is now in his spot, and notably, her first blog post deals with the handling of truth. Sullivan is overwhelmingly in favor of telling the truth and making sure the paper gets things right, so we can all exhale.

The new public editor praises some pieces that have challenged the validity of reports, thanks Jay Rosen for making fact-checking a big issue, and then — well, then she takes a tiny jab at Brisbane:

Whatever the conclusions, whatever the effectiveness, of challenging facts, the idea that we have to debate the necessity of doing so strikes me as absurd.

Right on.

Huffington Post Wins a Pulitzer

The winners of the 2012 Pulitzer Prizes were announced just minutes ago. And there were some shockers. Huffington Post military correspondent David Wood‘s 10-part series “Beyond the Battlefield” won the award for National Reporting.

“While it’s tempting to see the Huffington Post’s Pulitzer as a ‘big win for new media,’ or something like that, the real story is that these organizations — the Huffington Post, the New York Times, the Washington Post–are becoming more like each other. Old media and new media are increasingly antiquated terms,” NYU media critic Jay Rosen told HuffPo.

Could anyone imagine HuffPo winning a Pulitzer five years ago? Kudos to them for investing in real journalism.

In another shocker, The Stranger’s Eli Sanders won the award for Feature Writing. Sanders is the first alt-weekly writer to win a Pulitzer since Jonathan Gold did it back in 2007.

Full list of winners after the jump.

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NPR Officially Abandons ‘He Said, She Said’ Journalism: Jay Rosen Is Pleased

Last week, NPR announced major changes to its Ethics Handbook which effectively marked the end of the radio network’s old “he said, she said” standard of objectivity. Here’s a taste of the new language:

At all times, we report for our readers and listeners, not our sources. So our primary consideration when presenting the news is that we are fair to the truth. If our sources try to mislead us or put a false spin on the information they give us, we tell our audience. If the balance of evidence in a matter of controversy weighs heavily on one side, we acknowledge it in our reports. We strive to give our audience confidence that all sides have been considered and represented fairly.

This is a fairly radical departure from NPR’s old model of allowing a right-wing flack and a left-wing flack to lie their butts off and forcing listeners to assume the truth is somewhere in the middle. Needless to say, Pressthink blogger and media critic Jay Rosen, who had been badgering NPR for this type of shift for years, is pleased.

The “big idea” behind NPR, the reason we should care, is not protecting professional reputation, or newsroom credibility. Way too thin! The creation of an informed public that is capable of dealing with its many challenges: that’s what NPR is about. Bravo.

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Voice of San Diego Guidelines Get the Jay Rosen Seal of Approval

Nothing seems to bother press critic Jay Rosen more than what he calls the “he said, she said” model of journalism. You know, like when Warren Buffet says his tax rate is less than his secretary’s and the journalist reporting that statement feels obliged to get an obligatory “class warfare” quote from Republican trolls–and posits those two statements as somehow being equal.

Rosen is particularly bothered by NPR’s insistence on sticking to the “he said, she said” model. He’s in the midst of a two-part project to deconstruct NPR’s reporting techniques. But in the midst of that effort, Rosen was pleasantly surprised to find out that his anti-”he said, she said” model had made it into the Voice of San Diego’s editorial guidelines.

No “he said, she said.” The day we write a headline that says: “Proposal has pros, cons” is the day we start dying.

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Jay Rosen and The Four Ideas of Journalism

Jay Rosen has been talking, writing, and singing (unconfirmed) about journalism for 25 years now, and today he took to his blog Press Think to dispense what he’s learned about the subject during that time.

Rosen breaks journalism down to four ideas:

  1. The more people who participate in the press the stronger it will be.
  2. The profession of journalism went awry when it began to adopt the View from Nowhere.
  3. The news system will improve when it is made more useful to people.
  4. Making facts public does not a public make; information alone will not inform us.

We especially like idea number four, and always have. The thought that reporters and others are unbiased is ridiculous, and as Rosen explains, leads to mistrust among the public:

The problem is equating trustworthiness with the prohibition on taking sides, when the actual result may be exasperation with he said, she said, rage at the helplessness that ‘leaving it there’ creates, and mistrust of the formulaic ways in which journalists try to advertise their even-handedness.

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