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Posts Tagged ‘Jeff Jarvis’

So What Do You Do, Noah Rosenberg, Founder, CEO and EIC of Narratively?

Noah-Rosenberg-Article If there’s anything you should get from Noah Rosenberg‘s story, it’s that you should probably keep a notebook next to your bed — the brilliant thought that strikes you just before shut-eye could very well turn into a viable business. In Rosenberg’s case, his feverish, middle-of-the-night scribblings became Narratively, a multimedia platform dedicated to the human interest, slow-burn storytelling he’d always had a passion for and feared would disappear along with shrinking newsroom resources. He still has that notebook, by the way.

Narratively recently celebrated its two-year anniversary and so much has been accomplished since it first appeared on the Web. The site was placed on Time‘s “50 Best Websites of 2013″ within a year of its launch, its contributors have been approached for book deals, iconic pieces like “The Secret Life of a Manhattan Doorman” have attracted Hollywood’s attention, brands reach out to members of Narratively’s network of about 1,000 freelancers for high-quality content production, and people around the globe continue to flock to Narratively to read and watch its original content.

And of course Rosenberg is brimming with more and more ideas to tap into an even broader audience. Think spinoff sites like Narratively [Insert Name of Major City Here], Narratively Sports, Narratively Tech, or Narratively Food; iPhone and Android apps; Narratively Film Studios; a book; and more. “I think because of our ability to find these stories in unlikely places and to really tell these stories in a beautiful, meaningful way, we’re finding this wealth of opportunity, and we’re really excited about what the future will hold.” Rosenberg chats with Mediabistro about his on-the-job journalism training, Narratively’s beginnings and his plans for expansion.

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Pat Ryan, First Female Time Inc. Editor, Dies

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Pat Ryan, a pioneering Time Inc. editor, has died from complications due to cancer. She was 75.

Ryan — who started at Time Inc. as a secretary — served as managing editor of People and Life, and was the first female editor to oversee a Time Inc. publication.

Ryan has been credited with creating People’s “Sexiest Man Alive” franchise and backing the idea for Entertainment Weekly.

Jeff Jarvis, who was hired by Ryan, wrote in a post that he “owed his career” to Ryan.

Runaway Robocoin | Paginating Boston | Jarvis Jabs

RobocoinCustomerBitcoins Insider: The world’s first Bitcoin ATM went live Monday night at a Waves coffee shop in Vancouver, Canada. The machine can scan and recognize the palm of your hand, but it cannot explain why a product built by Robocoin in Nevada and tested in California had to commercially debut north of the 49th parallel.

GalleyCat: A portion of downtown Boston is set to become the U.S.’s first official Literary Cultural District. We applaud the issuers of today’s press release for resisting the urge to include the terminology “wicked smart.”

PRNewser: Jeff Jarvis caused a bit of a commotion with his comments at a “Content Frenzy” panel discussion. But in our line of work, we can’t tell you how many times in a given day it does indeed feel like “content is a tool.”

Ken Paulson Joins Patch Board of Advisors

Ken Paulson, the founding editor of USA Today, has joined Patch’s Board of Advisors. Paulson currently serves as president and CEO of Vanderbilt University’s First Amendment Center. He was one of the journalists who founded USA Today in 1982.

“There is no greater advocate for the first amendment and journalism than Ken Paulson,” said Patch co-founder Warren Webster, in a statement. “He has been an innovator throughout his career and will bring a critical voice to the development of Patch as the leading local information platform. We welcome Ken and look forward to his insights as we continue to chart new territory.”

Paulson joins a board that already includes Philip Meyer, Steven Berlin Johnson, Jeff Jarvis, and Brian Farnham.

Weinergate’s Biggest Media Winners and Losers

Whether or not he will resign, or be forced out for lack of ethical behavior, or lose his wife, Anthony Weiner is the major loser of the last couple of weeks. But at FishbowlNY, we’re as interested in the coverage of the story as we are in the story itself. Who is getting the scoops (and there seems to be many)? Who is falling behind? We’ve put together a list. Like the scandal itself, this list is a work in progress. We will update as things turn around.

WINNERS:

Andrew Breitbart and BigGovernment: Where do we begin? Breitbart broke the story of Weiner sending pictures to girl #1, Gennette Cordova, stood by it despite being accused of hacking himself, took over Weiner’s press-conference, received a public apology from Weiner, and got girl #2, Meagan Broussard, to share her story with him exclusively, as well as several pictures — including the infamous topless Weiner. This is Breitbart’s day in the sun. Not generally known for being a reliable source, this whole media circus has been Breitbart’s vindication, almost a game-changer. From his website:

BigGovernment.com publisher Andrew Breitbart was in New York for previously scheduled meetings and went to the presser as an observer… The press then asked Andrew to go to the podium to take some questions. It was surreal and awesome. According to FoxNews, a Weiner staff ran through the hotel halls screaming, “Breitbart’s here. Breitbart’s here.”

That pretty much sums it up.

RadarOnline.com: Seems to have full access to woman #3, Lisa Weiss, who made the sex scandal that much more salacious. RadarOnline is currently printing the entire transcript of her nine month long chat relationship with Weiner, for those who can’t get enough sordid details. We don’t recommend you read it, however, like we did. It made us unspeakably depressed.

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Bill Keller Tweets, Upsets New York Media

Bill Keller doesn’t tweet much, so when he posted the tweet shown here last night, people went crazy. Did anyone care that Keller was probably joking? No! Did it matter that it’s Twitter, and to a certain extent, it does make you stupid? No! Was it really even worth talking about? No!

But this is the New York media, and there is nothing New York media people enjoy more than overanalyzing the most trivial moments of other New York media people’s lives.

The Atlantic Wire collected the various responses to KellerGate, from Jeff Jarvis whiny “well the Times doesn’t tell us what to discuss anyway, so there!” reply, to David Carrs attempt to reason with Keller. It was a lot of talk about nothing.

And yes, we know, us discussing how this isn’t worth discussing makes us just as bad as everyone else. But we’re New York media, you shouldn’t expect anything better.

Jeff Jarvis Offers ‘Reality Check’ for Newspapers

On his blog today, Jeff Jarvis offers up some “hard economic lessons for news” and he takes the time to tell newspapers about how badly things are for them, as if that needed to be done again.

If you’re a newspaper fan like FishbowlNY, and for some reason you’re in too good of a mood today, here’s some of Jarvis’ comments. They’re sure to bring a cloud over any sun you’re seeing:

* Circulation will continue to decline. There can be no doubt.

* Cutting costs will reduce product quality and value, which will further reduce circulation. A vicious, unstoppable cycle.

* Falling circulation will continue to reduce ad revenue.

* Low-cost competitors and abundance will continue to reduce the price of advertising.

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How Well Is The Daily Actually Doing?

So, people love to hate on The Daily. That whole oldest dog in South Dakota thing. The fact that reporters keep leaving it for else where. But mostly people hate on it because they think no one is reading it, and everyone likes to engage in a little bit of schadenfreude.

But just how well, or poorly, is The Daily actually doing? When it began charging on March 21, it did so amid rumors that it had only 5,000 subscribers. While publisher Greg Clayman told Ad Age that downloads numbered in the “hundreds of thousands,” he wouldn’t say how many have paid for the app, only saying that the 5,000 figure “isn’t accurate.”

Jeff Bercovici at Forbes doesn’t know how many subscriptions The Daily has sold (that number remains a mystery) but he has amassed the data on how well The Daily did during trial: the app was downloaded 500,000 times, which means that around 2.5 percent of iPad users have at least tried out The Daily. He was also told The Daily has 75,000 “regular users,” meaning 15 percent of those who downloaded it liked it enough to keep reading it at least as long as it was free. The Daily didn’t officially comment on these figures, unsurprisingly.

Let’s put this in context: Jeff Jarvis estimated that The Daily would need 750,000 subscribers at its current price of 99 cents a week to start breaking even. So, guess they have their work cut out for them.

The Atlantic Debates Old, New Media

In the latest issue of The Atlantic, James Fallows puts together an impressive piece on old media vs. new media. He speaks to a wide range of people – Jay Rosen, Jeff Jarvis, Eric Schmidt – to give the article an all encompassing feel, but the meat of the piece is centered around Nick Denton and Gawker, who represent new media.

Fallows basically makes the case that Denton and Gawker are the future of media, and that though their way might seem shocking now, it’s important to realize the benefits of a rapidly changing media landscape.

The problem people have with embracing Gawker is that it doesn’t neccesarily provide real news, but that’s something that even Denton admits:

In my first ‘interview’ with him for this story, conducted over the course of nearly an hour through an instant-message exchange, he said that a market-minded approach like his would solve the business problem of journalism—but only for ‘a certain kind of journalism.’ It worked perfectly, he said, for topics like those his sites covered: gossip, technology, sex talk, and so on. And then, as an aside: ‘But not the worthy topics. Nobody wants to eat the boring vegetables. Nor does anyone want to pay [via advertising] to encourage people to eat their vegetables.’

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Washington Post Ombudsman Deborah Howell Dies

howell.jpgDeborah Howell, who was one of the first women in America to head up a major news organization with her work at the St. Paul Pioneer Press in Minnesota, died Friday evening in a car crash in New Zealand where she was vacationing. She was 68.

Though this unfortunate accident happened while we were on vacation, we’d like to point you in the direction of the myriad of writers who shared their personal memories of Howell — who also worked as a reporter and editor at The Minnesota Star and most recently served as ombudsman for The Washington Post — this weekend, from former Star editor Tim McGuire‘s remembrance to Jeff Jarvis‘ memorial blog titled “The Death of Curious Mind” on BuzzMachine.com and The New York TimesDavid Carr‘s memories of Howell as “the editor everyone should have had.”

Through these memorials — and many others made by colleagues and friends over the past few days — Deborah Howell will be remembered as both a pioneer for women in the field, as well as a great coworker, boss, journalist, editor and friend.

Read More: The death of a curious mind –BuzzMachine

Deborah Howell, prominent editor, killed in car accident –Star Tribune

My tortured journey to becoming Deborah Howell’s friend –Tim McGuire

The Editor Everyone Should Have HadNew York Times

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