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Posts Tagged ‘JI HYUN PARK’

The Benefits of J-School in the Digital Age

The cons of attending journalism school can typically be narrowed down to cost of tuition, the importance of real-life job experience, and the cost of tuition. But the contacts you’ll gain from a formal education can’t be underestimated — especially in a business where relationships are everything.

“I made friends with other journalism majors, and those connections have been invaluable in my career,” agreed Lauren Streib, a UNC journalism grad who is now an assistant editor at The Daily Beast. When you first graduate, you all may have entry-level positions or internships, but in about 10 years, your friends will be in charge of hiring decisions or have close relationships with people who do. In 20 years, you’ll be running the show.

Read more in 6 Reasons a Journalism Degree Is Still Necessary. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Mediabistro Course

Children's Picture Book Writing

Children's Picture Book WritingStarting September 15, this part lecture, part workshop course will take you through the process of outlining, writing, editing, and submitting a children's picture book. Taught by a published children's book author, Dashka Slater will teach you how to write in pictures, hook readers and editors with your story, apply the nuts and bolts of marketing, and more. Register now! 

Party Photos: Mediabistro’s Student and Intern Party in NYC

With summer internships well underway, mediabistro.com gave the hardworking interns a chance to mingle and share a drink at last night’s Mediabistro Student and Intern party.

On top of meeting future co-workers in the media world, the students also got a chance to chat with Alex Weprin, editor of TVNewser, and yours truly, editorial assistant and social media coordinator. Also present were Jessica Carlson, client services associate of the Job Board, education manager Amanda Pacitti and education assistant Sandra Reitman. Lots of advice and questions were swapped, but what was the biggest concern for the interns? Breaking into that first job.

Luckily for them, online marketing manager Caitlin McKinney hosted speed interviews for two openings at our own company: online marketing coordinator and events assistant. Nineteen hopefuls jumped into the interview with two to three minutes to prove themselves.

The rest of the students didn’t leave empty-handed. Each attendee received with a $50 discount to a year-long AvantGuild membership, and all had a chance to win a free Mediabistro class and a coffee with a mentor in the field of their choice.

Missed out last night? Then tune in to our free July 31 webcast on what it takes to jumpstart your career in media. Execs and editors from Travel + Leisure, Comedy Central and ABC Television will be online to help you discover the best ways to get your foot in the door.

In the meantime, check out more photos below of last night’s fun after the jump. Read more

What a Great Magazine Pitch Looks Like

Pitches That WorkedIf there’s one thing editors like writers to have, it’s access to the subject they’re pitching. For Alexis Adams, it was her experience living in a Greek village that helped her query about horta, an ingredient used in many Greek foods, transform into a 500-word piece for the travel pub Afar.

“She was pitching from first-hand experience and had already done significant research. And she laid out, in detail, the elements that would go into the story, whereas many writers simply pitch a concept,” said Derk RichardsonAFAR senior editor. “Moreover, there was an underlying sense of passion and curiosity, which is important when it comes to writing about food and essential when writing about anything for AFAR.”

THE PITCH

Dear Derk:

Paring knife in one hand, empty plastic bag in another, I am following my friend Lakis as he climbs a narrow goat path through thorny brush to a meadow he promises will yield tasty results. We are high on a mountain plateau on the eastern Peloponnese Peninsula in Greece, and we are in search of “horta,” the wild greens prized by Greeks for their health benefits and flavor…

Read the rest in Pitches that Worked: AFAR[subscription required]

Why Richard Lawson Left Gawker For Atlantic Wire

It’s been almost eight months since entertainment writer and TV recapper extraordinaire Richard Lawson jumped into The Atlantic Wire. After racking up 2.4 million monthly views as Gawker’s most popular writer, you’d think Lawson would want to stay put.

But in Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview, the scribe said he left Nick Denton‘s empire simply because it was time to “grow up.”

“After a while, the Gawker snark — for lack of a less heavy word — can get a bit tiring. I think it’s great and I think it has its place, but I felt like I wanted to be a little more mature, I guess,” he said. ”I love all of the writing at Gawker still, but just for myself, I’m getting a chance to do more serious movie reviews and stuff I think wouldn’t have necessarily played out well on Gawker.”

Land A Cover Story With Your Weekend Getaways

When you’re jetting off for the long holiday weekend, remember the stories and places you come across — they could land you a cover story.

GO, the award-winning in-flight magazine for Airtran, is seeking in-depth travel pieces on markets that are less-covered. ”We want to inspire really interesting ways of seeing different places,” said Jaime LoweGO‘s executive editor. “We want as many people as possible to get excited about learning about other communities, being surrounded by new experiences and pushing themselves, through travel.”

While most mags advise new writers to break in through smaller, front- or back-of-book stories, GO has a meaty feature well that’s ripe for the pitchin’ — even for first-time freelancers. “We’re always looking for new writers with great stories,” said Lowe. “A great idea always wins. If there’s an excellent travel narrative, we’ll assign it.”

For more details on breaking in, read How To Pitch: GO.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Hook Editors with a Travel Angle

Under-the-radar locales make for great stories in any travel mag, but, add a Hollywood hook, and editors at this Airtran mag can’t help but hop on board.

In honor of the 40th anniversary of the iconic movie Deliverance, a freelancer pitched and published a story to GO showcasing Georgia’s Tallulah Gorge, where the movie was filmed. The location (about an hour and a half outside of Atlanta) is a popular tourist destination not just because of its place in American pop culture, but also due to the richness of the region and wealth of activities for nature lovers, from whitewater rafting to hiking.

“We’re always looking for new writers with great stories,” said Jaime LoweGO‘s executive editor. “A great idea always wins. If there’s an excellent travel narrative, we’ll assign it.” Get more details in How To Pitch: GO.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

How Lola Ogunnaike Snagged Big Time Bylines

While Lola Ogunnaike has interviewed First  Lady Michelle Obama for BET and been a regular contributor for Today and MSNBC, her first love is writing, with her byline appearing in the pages of Rolling StoneVibeNew YorkElle and Glamour.

So what does it take to land those coveted cover stories time and time again? Cultivating strong relationships with editors, she says in mediabistro.com’s So What Do You Do? interview.

“One of the key things is to make sure they know who you are. That can be as simple as asking them out for coffee or tea or asking them out to dinner and offering to pay for both of those things, which is very important.”

Don’t think once you’ve got your story in, you’re done. “It’s also just following up with a link to a story that you may have written, something as simple as ‘You may not have gotten the chance to see my New York Times piece in the style section; thought you may be interested in this.’ What I found in my years in the industry is that most people don’t follow up. So, if you actually do, then that puts you head and shoulders above the pack.”

Read the full interview.

Earn $1/Word At Family Circle

General parenting magazines are aplenty in this industry, but Family Circle specifically zeroes in on the life of raising a teenager. So, scribes hoping for a byline need to make sure they offer concrete tips for the health and well-being of readers’ families.

“We offer essential advice for tough parenting challenges, fun suggestions for family activities, healthy and delicious recipes, and DIY projects to create a comfortable home,” said senior associate editor Stephanie Emma Pfeffer.

If you’re bursting with ideas in any of those topics, you’re in luck. FC relies on freelancers for about 60 percent of its content.

Get more guidelines in How To Pitch: Family Circle.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Boston Bylines For New Yorkers

Landing a byline at a regional pub when you’re an out-of-towner takes some effort, but as long as you keep in mind the audience you’re writing for, editors are usually open-minded.

Take The Boston Globe Magazine, for example. Editor-in-chief Susanne Althoff asks freelancers to remember that the Globe magazine is, at root, a local magazine. “That doesn’t mean we’re not interested in national trend stories,” she said. “But it’s got to be a trend that’s of interest to readers in the Boston area, or in the greater Boston/New England area.”

Find out where to send your story ideas in How To Pitch: The Boston Globe Magazine.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Kardashians Producer Knew Marriage Wouldn’t Last

When Kim Kardashian first started seeing wedding bells with Kris Humphries, producer Jonathan Murray didn’t bat an eyelash — because he knew it wouldn’t last.

“With Kim and her marriage, she showed up for Kourtney and Kim Take New York a week after the honeymoon, and we just documented what happened,” the executive producer of Keeping Up With the Kardashians said in mediabistro.com’s So What Do You Do? interview, “and it was pretty clear that these two people maybe weren’t exactly right for each other, that they didn’t have as much going for them as a couple as they thought they had when they entered the relationship.”

Murray, whose Bunim-Murray Productions also created The Real World, Road Rules and Bad Girls Club, also debunked rumors that his team encouraged the two to get hitched. “Kim did not seek us out as to who she should marry, nor should she. ”

Think you’ve got what it takes to be a reality TV producer, read the full interview for Murray’s tips on breaking in.

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