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Posts Tagged ‘Joe Nocera’

How Joe Nocera Can Enjoy Twitter

In an op-ed, The New York Times’ Joe Nocera explained that he didn’t like Twitter. However, his complaints weren’t really about Twitter itself, rather the way some people use Twitter.

In order to help Nocera understand this, we collected some of his complaints and issued some rebuttals. We hope this changes his mind.

So much on Twitter is frivolous or self-promotional.

Don’t follow people who are frivolous and self-promotional.

It can bury you in information.

Don’t follow too many people.

Because people often use Twitter to react to events instantly, they can say some awfully stupid things, as Roddy White, the Atlanta Falcons receiver, did after the George Zimmerman verdict, suggesting in a tweet that the jurors ‘should go home and kill themselves.’

Don’t follow people who say awfully stupid things. Or Roddy White. No one likes the Falcons aside from MC Hammer. Follow MC Hammer.

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What Happened to The Wall Street Journal‘s Longform Journalism?

The Wall Street Journal hasn’t won a Pulitzer Prize for its news reporting since 2007. It wasn’t even nominated this year. And a new chart from the Columbia Journalism Review may highlight a reason why.

Since News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch bought the United States’ largest newspaper by circulation six years ago, there has been a steady decline in the long-form journalism that once distinguished the business world’s paper of record.

CJR isn’t the first to notice this. Back in 2011, amid the calamity of News Corp.’s phone-hacking scandal in the U.K., New York Times op-ed columnist Joe Nocera declared the “Fox-ification” of the paper, noting that Murdoch’s Journal was marked by “shorter articles, less depth, an increased emphasis on politics and, weirdly, sometimes surprisingly unsophisticated coverage of business.”

While some of his criticism seems unwarranted — and likely fueled by the chaotic speed with which more and more phone-hacking accusations splashed onto front pages across the English speaking work — the “shorter articles, less depth” argument seems to hold true.

The Journal defended itself with this public statement after CJR‘s Dean Starkman published the chart:

The number of words in an article has never been the barometer by which the quality of a publication or its value to readers should be measured. Every article is reported with unique facts and anecdotes that are needed to best tell the story. We consider those factors, while respecting our readers’ busy lives, when determining the length of an article. Our very strong circulation numbers suggest that readers think we’re doing a good job.

 Read Starkman’s full post (he’s a glorious writer) and The Atlantic‘s Alexis C. Madrigal‘s take, too.

Want to Cruise to the Mediterranean with NYT Journalists?

Have you ever thought: I want to go on vacation, and I want to do it with a reporter from The New York Times?

Yeah, we haven’t either.

But The New York Times is betting that someone has.

The paper, in partnership with Insight Cruises, has launched Times Journeys, an “educational travel program that connects readers and lifelong learners with Times journalists while they enjoy the pleasures of travel.”

The inaugural trip sounds like a pretty fabulous 12-night Eastern Mediterranean cruise, sailing round-trip from Venice, Italy, with stops in Montenegro, Greece, Turkey and Croatia.

And while you’re sailing the high seas:

Times journalists will engage participants in conversation and thought-provoking analysis on an expedition of seminars covering current events, film, science, music and technology.

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WSJ’s Alan Murray: ‘We are suffering from guilt by association’

As the fallout from the phone hacking scandal continues, The Wall Street Journal has desperately tried to maintain its autonomy from News Corporation. Unfortunately, when editorials that read like a press release are published within its pages, it makes things a little difficult for everyone there to do that (even if they don’t like the editorial).

Alan Murray, the paper’s Deputy Managing Editor, and a few other Journal staffers spoke to WWD today and expressed their frustration with the situation. Murray defended the Journal, even adding that Rupert Murdoch has made it a better place:

We do feel we are suffering from guilt by association. My feeling, and that of many here, is that this is in many ways a better paper than it was four years ago, and Rupert Murdoch and Les Hinton both deserve great credit for investing in us and supporting and encouraging good journalism here.

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James Stewart to Write Business Column for The New York Times

James Stewart, the Pulitzer-winning writer who contributes to The New Yorker and Smart Money, will now pen a weekly business column for The New York Times. Stewart is replacing Joe Nocera, who moved to the editorial section.

According to Talking Biz News, the formal announcement is expected later today.

More Changes at The New York Times Opinion Section

As Frank Rich departs, Joe Nocera arrives. Michael Calderone at The Cutline is reporting that Nocera is moving from the Business section of the New York Times to its Op-Ed pages, beginning April 1st.

Andy Rosenthal said the following in a memo to Times staffers, regarding Nocera’s new digs:

Our readers have come to rely on his sharp insights into the often opaque world of business and finance. We’re certain he will find a new audience on Op-Ed, where we know he will continue to illuminate difficult issues and expose bad behavior by business and government.

Joe Nocera Changing Titles At The New York Times

After five-plus years as a business writer, Joe Nocera is making a move at The New York TimesJeff Bercovici reports that Nocera will join Nobel Prize winner Paul Krugman by contributing to NYT’s op-ed page.  The move makes Nocera the Times’s first new, full-time op-ed columnist since Ross Douthat replaced Bill Kristol in 2009.

Prior to joining the Grey Lady in 2005, Nocera spent over a decade as editorial director at Fortune magazine.  He has won two Gerald Loeb awards and three John Hancock awards to mark his achievements in business writing.  Nocera also was a Pulitzer Prize finalist this past year.

New Hires At Slate

Business Insider is reporting this morning that Slate is adding two new reporters to its masthead: Bethany McClean will cover all things Wall Street and finance-related in her own upcoming column, and Annie Lowrey will take over Slate’s Moneybox section, covering economics. Lowrey will thus take over the spot vacated by former Moneybox scribe Dan Gross, who left last month.

McClean will presumably continue contributing to Vanity Fair. She also has a book due out November 16th with Joe Nocera, All the Devils Are Here.

Lowrey most recently worked at  The Washington Independent.

Four Columns, Four Writers, and a ‘Written By’: The NYT Attempts to Put the Credit Crisis in Context

nyt4clmn.pngSome of you may have noticed the rather thick byline on today’s New York Times four column-wide, front-page story about the last 36 hours of the credit crisis. Multiple bylines are not unusual on reported pieces, however, generally when other reporters contribute to a story they are mentioned at the end. What caught our eye this time was the phrasing of the byline: “This article was reported by Andrew Ross Sorkin, Diana B. Henriques, Edmund L. Andrews and Joe Nocera. It was written by Mr. Nocera.” [emphasis ours]

A quick search through the Times database reveals that the phrasing is unusual at best: it’s only been used a handful of times and almost always for a “news analysis” piece. What also caught our eye was the timing of this story. Normally, these sort of round-up, analysis pieces are reserved for the Sunday Times (notwithstanding the long and glorious era of R.W. Apple) but one supposes with the super accelerated news cycle of the past three weeks, every second counts.

Pulitizer Prize Finalists Leaked Out Of Columbia

The juries packed up yesterday after three days of judging at Columbia University, and the New York Times — including Joe Nocera for commentary — and Wall Street Journal appear to lead the list Pulitzer Prize finalists cobbled together by E&P‘s Joe Strupp.

  • Here We Go Again [E&P]