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Posts Tagged ‘Joe Saltzman’

Memorial This Sunday for KCBS Vet Mike Daniels

This weekend in Marina del Rey, friends, family, colleagues and students of Mike Daniels will pay tribute to the departed local broadcast legend at a memorial from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the California Yacht Club. It’s where Daniels for many years docked his boat Grand Cru. He recently passed away at age 77 from cancer.

Daniels started working at KCBS in 1958 upon graduation from USC and stayed there until retirement. He also, starting in 1974, returned to campus as a teacher and separately also guided journalism aspirants at Loyola Marymount. From a recent Annenberg TV News report:

Daniels’ stories – ranging from investigative pieces to breaking news – earned him several Emmys and Golden Mike awards. Colleague and USC professor of journalism Joe Saltzman said Daniels was a “calming force” in the hectic, fast-paced world of TV news.

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Former Daily Trojan Editors-in-Chief Reminisce About Their Days on Campus

During its first hundred years, USC’s Daily Trojan has been guided by some mightily impressive editors-in-chief. Everyone from “The Fastest Human in the World” (1920 Summer Olympics gold medalist Charles Paddock) to various LA Times employees (Roger Smith, Kate Mather).

For the paper’s Centennial Supplement, reporter Alexis Driggs runs through this and other aspects of the paper’s top-down ranks, followed by a compilation of testimonial quotes from various former Trojan newsroom quarterbacks. The remembrances are all worth reading, starting with this one from Sara Libby, EIC in the fall of 2005. She is currently transitioning from associate editor at Talking Points Memo to managing editor at Voice of San Diego:

“The most important thing I learned was that ultimately, the big decisions lay with me and I had to trust myself on them. Obviously there was always pushback from certain student groups who felt they were being covered unfairly, but even I had professors trying to get me fired or expelled for covering them. But I tried to just tell myself and my staff that if we were being fair and working hard, we would land on our feet, and we did.”

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USC Pop Culture Expert is Scripps Howard ‘Journalism Teacher of the Year’

First off, just how much fun does a university project named “The Image of the Journalist in Pop Culture” sound?

The massive database at USC’s Norman Lear Center, launched in 2000, now encompasses more than 76,000 records. The goal is to “investigate and analyze the conflicting images of the journalist in film, television, radio, fiction, commercials, cartoons, comic books, music, art, demonstrating their impact on the American public’s perception of newsgatherers.” And the man who oversees the program, Joe Saltzman (pictured), has just been voted 2010′s Journalism and Mass Communication Teacher of the Year by the Scripps Howard Foundation.

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Remembering a Legendary High School Journalism Teacher

J.K. Yamamoto, a reporter with LA Japanese newspaper Rafu Shimpo, shares a long and wonderful obit for Ted Tajima, an 88-year-old retired journalism teacher who passed away last month.

Tajima made all sorts of epic contributions to the Southern California journalism landscape, but one of his most impressive feats while at Alhambra High School was guiding student newspaper The Moor to All-Amerian honors from the National Scholastic Press Association every single year from 1957 until his retirement in 1983. Recalls LA Times staff writer (and one-time Tajima protégé) Elaine Woo:

“It’s sad that he could not become a reporter or editor for a mainstream newspaper. He finished college right after World War II and anti-Japanese sentiment was a huge barrier. I never heard him express bitterness about this, although I’m sure he felt it.”

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