TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘John F. Sturm’

Newspapers Draw One-Third Of Web Users In Q4

papers3.jpgAccording to data released today by the Newspaper Association of America, newspapers’ Web sites drew more than one-third all Internet users during the fourth quarter of 2009.

Thanks to custom stats generated for the NAA by Nielsen Online, the industry association learned that newspaper Web sites drew 72 million visitors during the quarter, or 37 percent of total Internet users. Newspaper Web site users also “generated more than 3.2 billion page views during the quarter, spending more than 2.4 billion minutes browsing the sites,” the NAA revealed today.

Said NAA president John F. Sturm:

“These strong and consistent audience figures come as newspaper publishers continue to transition their companies into multiplatform content providers to meet the needs of today’s audience. As the economy begins to stabilize, newspaper companies are in position to leverage their trusted brands to reach a highly engaged audience and deliver maximum value to advertisers.”

Read more: Press release with chart

Previously: Study: Newspapers Are Retaining Readers Despite Price Increases

Sponsored Post

Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Study: Newspapers Are Retaining Readers Despite Price Increases

papers2.jpgIn an effort to survive their recent economic struggles, newspapers across the country have increased home delivery and single copy prices.

But a recent study by the Newspaper Association of America has revealed that despite increased prices, fewer subscribers are canceling their subscriptions.

According to data from the the NAA’s 2009 Circulation Facts, Figures and Logic study, the percentage of subscribers who have canceled their subscriptions fell to 31.8 percent last year, compared to 54.5 percent several years ago in 2000.

NAA President and CEO John F. Sturm attributed this lack of churn to newspapers’ focus on retaining readers in prime markets in order to give advertisers the most for their money. The study’s data also revealed that readers were drawn in through new business models and multi-platform content, the NAA said.

Well, at least the industry is doing something right. And readers are staying loyal and sticking by their papers even as sub prices rise. It’s heartening news.

Related: Grim Revenue Number For Papers As Publishers Meet Secretly

(Photo via flickr)

Grim Revenue Numbers For Papers As Publishers Meet Secretly

newspapers.pngHot on the heels of news that newspaper executives from across the country met secretly in Chicago yesterday, the Newspaper Association of America released troubling revenue numbers for the first quarter of 2009.

According to the NAA, total revenues for papers in the U.S. dropped 28.3 percent during the first quarter of the year, down to $6.6 billion from $9.2 billion during the same period last year. (For reference, first quarter revenue hovered in the $11 to $10 billion range for the five years prior to 2008.)

This precipitous drop is due to a 29.7 percent decline in print ad revenues (down to $5.9 billion from $8.4 billion in Q1 of 2008) and a 13.4 percent decrease is online advertising revenue (down to $696 million from $804 million last year).

Reportedly, executives at yesterday’s meeting discussed ways to monetize online content, but they have be careful in describing what the confab was about in order to avoid antitrust scrutiny. NAA president John F. Sturm told Nieman Journalism Lab that antitrust counsel was present at the meeting and noted that “the group discussed business topics such as protection of intellectual property rights and approaches to the Congress and Administration to address these and other issues.”

If the revenue numbers from the first quarter of 2009 are any indication, something needs to be done to ensure that newspapers will be around in the future — and fast. Otherwise, we’ll be seeing more papers go the way of the Rocky Mountain News in the near future.