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Posts Tagged ‘John Koblin’

New York Times Names Styles Reporter

NYtimes buildingThe New York Times has hired John Koblin as a styles reporter. Koblin comes to the paper from Deadspin, where he has worked for the past year.

In a memo obtained by WWD (Koblin previously worked for WWD as a media reporter), Stuart Emmrich, the Times’ style editor, wrote that he was he excited to add Koblin:

Over the past month, I have had several long conversations with John about our fashion coverage — discussing in detail how he might have approached some of our news stories differently, what other angles he might have pursued, what he would have done to try to raise them to the level of A1 — and in each case I have come away with the same reaction: Total excitement at the prospect of having him on the Styles staff.

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Deadspin Investigation Leads to Sacking of ESPN Columnist Sarah Phillips

A great investigative piece by Deadspin’s John Koblin published late yesterday uncovered some very disturbing things about ESPN.com columnist Sarah Phillips. If the story is true, and by all accounts it seems to be, Phillips conspired to hijack the popular Facebook page NBA Memes from its owner to drive traffic to her startup site Sports Comedy Network. Koblin also alleges she borderline extorted thousands of dollars from a gambling acquaintance.

Phillips was fired by ESPN within hours of the piece’s publication.

She also tweets that she has returned proprietorship of NBA Memes to its rightful owner.

The whole story of Phillips’ deceptions is fairly complicated. Best to read the whole thing.

WWD Adds Media Reporter

Erik Maza, a Features Reporter for the Baltimore Sun since 2010, has been tapped by Women’s Wear Daily to replace John Koblin, who left to join Deadspin. Maza will take on Koblin’s media reporting duties. Prior to the Sun, Maza worked at the Miami New Times and the Orlando Sentinel.

According to the New York Observer, Maza is “excited” about the opportunity and starts May 14.

Welcome to the beat, Maza.

Gawker Media Adds Two

Gawker Media has added two staffers. A.J. Daulerio, Gawker’s Editor-in-Chief, tweeted that Rich Juzwiak is joining the site and Capital New York reports that John Koblin is leaving WWD to join Deadspin. Juzwiak is coming to Gawker from The Daily.

Daulerio added that there are “more additions soon,” so we’ll keep you posted.

Alix Freedman Leaves WSJ for Reuters

Alix Freedman — a veteran of The Wall Street Journal for almost 30 years — is leaving the paper to join Reuters. John Koblin of WWD just tweeted that Robert Thomson said, “We all owe Alix a great debt for what she has contributed to the paper and the culture.” Freedman will serve as Reuters’ Global Editor for Ethics and Standards.

This is the third Journal vet to leave the paper in the past two days. Just yesterday, it lost Nick Wingfield and Amy Chozick to The New York Times.

The Hearst Mindset

Amy Wicks and John Koblin at WWD have a great piece this morning that examines how Hearst Corporation’s budget-conscious ways has become the industry standard. Hearst Corp’s CEO Frank Bennack has a long history of preaching sensible spending and a no-frills approach that now has the company poised to pass one of its biggest rivals:

Now that there appear to be some signs of life in the beleaguered publishing world, Bennack’s parsimony has positioned Hearst to make a blockbuster deal. The company is on the verge of spending $700 million to $800 million to pick up the Hachette International portfolio from Lagardère that includes Elle, Elle Decor, Woman’s Day and Car and Driver (Lagardère would keep the French titles). The deal will make Hearst the second-largest magazine company in the U.S. in terms of circulation, audience and advertising, surpassing Condé Nast.

Also worth mentioning is that while Condé Nast has folded six magazines over the last few years, Hearst has shut down only a few.

Read more

Sales for iPad Magazines Fall

John Koblin of WWD has a report today that iPad magazines from popular titles like GQ, Wired, Glamour, and Vanity Fair are hitting a rough patch. In November GQ posted its worst month since the iPad came out (selling only 11,000 times), Wired sold almost 10,000 times less than its debut month, Glamour’s iPad sales dropped 40 percent, and Vanity Fair sales dropped to 8,700, down from its average of about 10,500.

There is hope, however, as Koblin points out that the magazines might get a boost in sales from people getting gadgets for the holidays. Here’s hoping people will be nice, and not naughty to the mags.

Bill Keller Comments on Recent Losses

In the last 10 days The New York Times has seen several senior editors and writers take jobs elsewhere, and at a certain point you have to wonder if the Gray Lady is starting to sweat. John Koblin of WWD got Bill Keller, Executive Editor of the paper, to comment on losing the Op-Ed Editor (David Shipley), the Business section Editor (Tim O’Brien) a Middle East correspondent (Dexter Filkins), a senior tech writer (Ashlee Vance), and The New York Times Magazine Food Editor (Christine Muhlke), all within a short time. Keller attempts to be as nonchalant as possible:

We’ve had raids before, and every case is its own thing. If there’s a theme to the recent departures, I think it’s that now the recruiters are less likely to be traditional competitors — WaPo, LAT, WSJ. Now the big-money offers come from a newer competitive set — HuffPo, Bloomberg, etc. — that are suddenly investing in, pardon the expression, content. It may represent a recognition that aggregation isn’t everything.

Try as he might, it’s easy to pick up on the bitterness in Keller’s comment. It sounds like the losses might finally be catching up with him and the Times. Especially when O’Brien, who is going to the Huffington Post, offers up his reason for leaving the paper after so many years:

We’re all standing in the middle of this digital tsunami that’s washing across the journalism landscape.

Let’s hope Keller has a lifeboat.

Condé’s Advance Publications Opens Corporate Development SVP Role for Andrew Siegel

After stints at GE and Yahoo! Andrew Siegel will be joining Advance Publications‘s mergers and acquisitions department as the new SVP of corporate development.  WWD’s John Koblin reports that Advance welcomed Siegel on the same day Discovery Communications bought back $500 million worth of stock from them.  Siegel will have plenty of funds to play with and, according to advance.net chairmen Steven Newhouse, will be tasked with advancing the publisher’s digital strategy:

Because of his digital experience at Yahoo, he’s particularly well-suited to do deals in that space, and there are a lot of opportunities to do deals that might benefit Condé Nast.

Although Siegel has no print publishing experience he has filled similar roles as head of corporate development at GE and Yahoo!.  In his time at Yahoo!, Siegel was the point man on the acquisitions of Associated Content and Citizen Sports.  He will begin work at Advance on Jan. 3.

WSJ. Beefs Up Staff

After rolling out her debut issue of WSJ. with the help of only five workers, editor Deborah Needleman is ready to surround herself with some more talent.  John Koblin reports that WSJ. has added four experienced names to the lifestyle magazine’s staff:

Former Elle senior fashion news editor Whitney Vargas will serve as WSJ.’s fashion news director

Nadia Vellam, who worked as a photo editor for W and freelancer for WSJ., will become photo director

Fiona Murray will move from fashion editor to features director

Associate fashion editor Andrew Lutjens is now WSJ.’s market editor

WSJ. will release their next issue in March.

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