FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘John Koblin’

Bon Appétit Adds Christine Muhlke and Meghan Sutherland To Editing Staff

After signing on as editor-in-chief at in late October, Adam Rapoport is making sure the foodie mag keeps a prime spot at the table by bringing some talented new faces to the Bon Appétit team.  WWD’s John Koblin reports that Christine Muhlke will join Bon Appétit as an executive editor and Meghan Sutherland has been hired as the title’s deputy editor.  Rapoport spoke glowingly of Muhlke when discussing his reasons for the move:

Christine is incredibly prolific as a writer and editor and is obsessively knowledgeable about every last thing going on in the food world every minute, every day.  She knows the restaurant you don’t know about yet, she knows about the chefs that matter. And, I am jealous of what a great home cook home she is, which in my book is critical to being at Bon Appétit.

Prior to joining Bon Appétit, Muhlke served as the food editor at The New York Times Magazine.  She will begin work at her new executive editor post on Jan. 3.  Sutherland, who was previously a deputy editor at Teen Vogue, will get started at Bon Appétit on Dec. 15

Scott Dadich To Keep Things Strictly Digital At Condé Nast

Until last Friday, Scott Dadich was juggling two job titles at once: creative director at Wired and Condé Nast’s executive director of digital-magazine development.  Now, WWD’s John Koblin is reporting that Dadich will concentrate solely on the latter of the two roles and continue to develop the company’s new media agenda. 

Since July, Dadich has been back and forth between managing Wired magazine in San Francisco and teaching print editors in New York how to incorporate their copy with new tech devices (i.e. tablet computers).  Dadich has been at the forefront of company’s new media ventures and connected Condé Nast to Adobe to build iPad apps for Wired and The New Yorker.  Other company titles including Vanity Fair, GQ, and Glamour also have apps that are currently in development.

Dadich’s move may be motivated by the recent decline in Wired‘s digital performance.  According to the Audit Bureau of Circulations Rapid Report, after selling 100,000 copies in its debut month of June, the magazine’s iPad app sold just 59,000 combined copies in July and August.

Nick Summers Moves To The New York Observer, Much To The Consternation Of One Village Voice Tipster

By now, you’re likely aware that John Koblin has left The New York Observer for WWDier pastures. Now, nearly a month since the announcement that he was leaving made its way across the interwebs, comes news of his successor, courtesy of Runnin’ Scared: Nick Summers. Summers founded snarkelitist blog IvyGate and formerly worked as a reporter for Newsweek.

But, alas, this doesn’t mean that everything is all sunshine flowers and gin-flavored lollipops at the Observer offices:

Zeke Turner was the junior reporter under Koblin, and Summers is being brought in above him. A tipster writes in:

Zeke should have gotten that job. The morale in the newsroom is already in the dumps: hiring an outsider only makes it worse. I’m sure Nick is a good guy and talented. But Kyle doesn’t understand that Observer writers were never stars when they got into those spots (including Koblin, Sherman, Calderone, etc.). They become stars by having natural talent and moving up the ranks. Maybe he doesn’t know how to raise young writers (/be a fucking editor) so he gives these jobs away to more established people. It’s crap.

Dramatical.

Sara Vilkomerson Is The Latest Departure From The New York Observer

According to Foster Kamer of The Village Voice‘s Runnin’ Scared blog, Sara Vilkomerson has left her post as culture editor at The New York Observer. Vilkomerson’s departure comes just 11 days after John Koblin made the move from the Observer to Women’s Wear Daily.

Vilkomerson ran the Very Short List, the Observer’s collection of unique, daily emails that recommend must see products that would otherwise go unnoticed by consumers.  There is no word yet on Vilkomerson’s plans for the future.

John Koblin Exits the New York Observer

The Village Voice reports that John Koblin quit the New York Observer and is moving to Women’s Wear Daily. Former Observer editor Peter Kaplan, is editorial director for Fairchild Fashion Group, which includes WWD. Kaplan ran the Observer until last summer, just under two years after it was purchased by Jared Kushner.

Reportedly, Koblin told editor-in-chief Kyle Pope his decision this morning.

Koblin spent four years at the Observer covering the New York media. He’ll cover the same beat for WWD.

Scandalous NYT David Paterson Story Not Even About David Paterson

newrrrr.jpg

One day we’ll all look back on the David Paterson/New York Times alleged expose and laugh about how desperate we all were for a juicy story in the middle of a long, cold February. For now though, we’re just trying to piece together how a story about a New York governor’s aide having a sordid history turned into a media spectacle about Governor Paterson having an affair. Here’s what we’ve come up with.

Read more

Zachery Kouwe Resigns From New York Times Over Plagiary Charges

kouwe190.jpg

This has not been a good month for looking over your shoulder and copying your classmates work: Just last week, Gerald Posner from The Daily Beast resigned after he was caught by Jack Shafer copying portions of The Miami Herald in his columns.

Now New York Times writer Zachery Kouwe has resigned from his business beat over at the newspaper after it was discovered that his role at Dealbook involved at least six instances of copying of press releases and other news sources word for word.

So what was Kouwe’s excuse for the misdeed? Apparently they keep him so busy at Dealbook that he didn’t have time to realize that he was inadvertently stealing other people’s words.

Read more

New York Times Won’t Address Paterson Rumors

front020910.jpg

In the Sunday edition of The New York Times, Clark Hoyt fumed about the nature of salacious rumor-mongering about the alleged sex scandal his paper was assumed to be writing about New York Governor David Paterson. From John Koblin at The New York Observer to the front-page of The New York Post, the story so saturated in this month’s news cycle that Paterson himself had to address the issue in a conference. Now the Times is taking an official stance on the subject: “No comment.”

Read more

No News Means Fake News

David_Pater555son_2_by_David_Shankbone.jpg

Is the New York Post‘s column about Governor David Paterson maybe, possibly having an affair becoming more believable the more it gets passed around? That would be the thesis of yesterday’s New York Observer column by John Koblin, who argues that the “fake news cycle” – that can only exist thanks to the wonders of the Internet and story forwarding – has allowed media to “enter a moment where even the process of journalism—getting a story—is news in and of itself.” This is based on the fact that Paterson actually had to address the issues of his affair, and a timeline of all the blogs and news media that reported the news (Koblin first broke the rumor of the NYT story on Twitter).

But the truth is, politicians’ sexual scandals have always been ripe fodder for both tabloids and legitimate journalism outlets, and it’s not like Page Six suddenly started existing when Web 2.0 developed. It is not a new development that reporting on a story suddenly makes it true to a vast majority of readers, only that the Internet provides outlets allowing anyone to discuss and debate these salacious items, creating more “hype” for what may turn out to be a total non-story.

Read More: The Fake-News Cycle — New York Observer, Shock for Gov. Paterson’s mansion cop — New York Post

Newsday‘s Pay Wall Experiment Yields Disappointing Results

newsnews234.jpgNo matter how you try to sugarcoat it, trying to make people pay for online news content isn’t easy. And Long Island daily Newsdayalready dealing with its fair share of negotiation problems between owner Cablevision and its staff — may now have to come to terms with the fact that its decision to put a $5 a week/$260 a year price tag on its site was a bad move.

According to John Koblin in The New York Observer, only 35 people have subscribed to pay for the site. And while it’s easy to mock those numbers, we’re more interested in why: is it because the people who pay to subscribe for sites usually do so in a national context (while Newsday is a local paper)? Is it the high price tag (or the hole in the pay wall)? Or is it that the content that Newsday puts out could be found elsewhere for free on the Internet? Or, most likely, is it because everyone who would read the content on Newsday‘s site can already access it as a subscriber of the print edition or a Cablevision customer?

Update: A spokesperson from Newsday.com issued FishbowlNY the following statement:

“Millions of Cablevision customers in the New York tri-state area and 75 percent of Long Island households, including all Newsday home delivery subscribers, now have exclusive access to newsday.com at no additional charge. Internal research shows that Newsday’s Web site is an extremely popular new benefit to hundreds of thousands of Long Island Cablevision households.”

Read More: After Three Months, Only 35 Subscriptions for Newsday’s Web SiteThe Observer

Previously: A Hole In Newsday’s Pay Wall, Newsday.com Sees Pay Wall-Induced Drop In Traffic , Newsday Staffers Vote Against Cablevision’s “Horrible and Unprecedented” Proposal

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>