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Posts Tagged ‘John Seeley’

Morning Media Newsfeed: USA-Germany Crashes WatchESPN | Publishing Sales Fall

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ESPN Live Stream Crashes During USA-Germany World Cup Match (Variety)
Many users across the U.S. were unable to access ESPN’s WatchESPN video-streaming service as the USA-Germany match in the 2014 FIFA World Cup kicked off at noon ET on Thursday. An ESPN rep said the sports programmer was “investigating some limited issues due to unprecedented demand.” WatchESPN viewership for the first half of the USA-Germany match peaked at more than 1.4 million concurrent viewers. Re/code For context: During the Winter Olympics, NBCUniversal reached a peak of 850,000 concurrent viewers when it streamed the U.S./Russia Hockey game. TVNewser CNN’s Lara Baldesarra, Fox News’ Bryan Llenas, CBS’ Elaine Quijano, ABC’s Paula Faris and NBC’s Natalie Morales covered the World Cup for their respective networks. Mediaite The media world, like the rest of the country, apparently stopped what it was doing to gather around televisions and watch the match. Capital New York ESPN, which is a U.S. rights-holder, held a viewing party at its Bristol, Conn. campus. At ESPN sister network ABC, ABC News staffers were invited to watch the game, and the network provided food and red, white and blue rocket pops. At CBS News, CBS This Morning executive producer Chris Licht brought in pizza, with the game playing on a big screen. At NBC News, the executive team was advised to order in lunch and give their teams a chance to watch the game too. CNN also had a pizza party for staffers while the game was on.

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Founding Editor of WSJ Metro Section Cut

WSJ-twitter-logoJohn Seeley, the founding editor of The Wall Street Journal’s Greater New York section, has been cut by the paper. Seeley had been with the Journal since 2009. Prior to joining the Journal, he served as deputy managing editor of The New York Sun.

A Journal spokesperson told Capital New York that the paper has been ”evaluating many areas of the newsroom.”

Seeley, in a memo to staffers, had a different way of describing his ouster:

Tonight I’m the bearer of bad news: The corporate belt-tighteners have decided that it would be best for the company if I were squeezed out. The worst part for me is that I will no longer be able to work to continue the section’s exciting maturation. The best part is that I got to teach my kid a new word — downsizing.

Kirsten Danis Makes Move To The Wall Street Journal

After nearly a decade as deputy and managing editor at the New York Daily News, Kirsten Danis is jumping ship and heading to The Wall Street Journal.  According to The New York Observer, Danis will serve as deputy editor on the Greater New York desk and report to editor John Seeley.  Danis had some positive parting words as she exited the Daily News.

I love the Daily News. I think it’s a fantastic newspaper, full of incredibly talented people.

Before joining the Daily News nine years ago, Danis worked as a reporter and editor at the New York Post.

WSJ‘s Local NY Looks Bigger Than Expected

3008.jpgWhen a media company starts hiring, it makes news. And when that company is hiring more people than expected it’s a cause for celebration.

This fall, we were excited to learn that The Wall Street Journal was seeking to hire about a dozen local New York reporters to cover everything from city and state government to the arts for a new section in the paper set to compete directly against The New York Times.

But the hiring news now is getting even better (although the Times might disagree). Today, The New York Observer reports that the Journal‘s New York bureau will actually include three times as many staffers as originally expected — including a number of former New York Sun writers and editors, like John Seeley, the former managing editor of the Sun, who has been picked to lead the new bureau. Other reported hires include former Sun staffers Jacob Gershman, Kate Taylor, Erica Orden and Ryan Sager, and Michael Saul from The New York Daily News.

It’s no secret that Rupert Murdoch, CEO of Journal owner News Corp., has no love lost for the Times, and this new venture is seen among New York media circles as a direct assault against the Gray Lady’s dominance in the local media space, especially in arts coverage. We’re waiting patiently until April to see what this new launch will bring — and whether another feud between the Journal and the Times will crop up before then.

Read more: Rupert vs. the WorldThe Observer

Previously: Times-Journal Feud Update, Wall Street Journal Looks To Hire Local NY Reporters

WSJ‘s San Fran Edition Launches Tomorrow|Rick Warren Pub Folds|Sun‘s Seeley To Run WSJ‘s NYC Section|Papers Rescind AP Cancellations|Newspapers Need Ad Sales Now

BayNewser: The Wall Street Journal is launching its local San Francisco edition tomorrow. WSJ told BayNewser that editing and reporting on the edition will be done by current Journal staff — compared to The New York Times‘ Bay Area pub, which is looking for partners to produce content.

MediaWeek: Reader’s Digest Association folds quarterly Christian-themed magazine and Rick Warren vehicle Purpose Driven Connection.

New York Observer: John Seeley, former deputy managing editor of The New York Sun, has been picked to lead The Wall Street Journal‘s new New York-focused section.

Editor & Publisher: About 50 newspapers who have given The Associated Press notice that they may cancel their subscriptions have rescinded their cancellation notices in recent months. About 130 remain under cancellation notices, while papers like The New York Daily News have said they won’t end their relationship with the AP.

Wall Street Journal: No surprise here: newspapers are suffering from severe advertising declines and need to show some real gains soon in order to have any chance of survival.