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Posts Tagged ‘John Skipper’

Jill Abramson Added to NYC Re/code Event

Right after Labor Day, former New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson will make her first non-commencement-address stage appearance since being booted from the Grey Lady. As part of a Thursday September 4 Re/code Code/Media series event.

ReCodeMediaSeries_09_04

From co-producer Peter Kafka’s note:

You may not be familiar with [Meredith] Valiando Rojas. But there’s a good chance your kids have been to one of her shows, or want to go: she’s the CEO of DigiTour, the Live Nation for the Web video generation, which puts on sold-out concerts featuring YouTube and Vine stars. And if that seems odd to you, that’s just fine with her: Ryan Seacrest and Conde Nast’s Advance Publications are already believers.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ESPN/PBS Doc Fallout | Times Co. CEO Dishes | WaPo‘s MLK Snub


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Was ESPN Sloppy, Naïve or Compromised? (ESPN / Ombudsman)
So what’s more damaging to a corporate image: to be considered sloppy, naïve or compromised? Or all three? You get to pick in the wake of ESPN’s announcement that it was removing its brand from an upcoming two-part documentary by PBS’ Frontline that “reveals the hidden story of the NFL and brain injuries” (or so it claims in a controversial trailer). The ESPN action drew immediate media and mailbag accusations that the NFL had pressured the network into severing ties to the PBS films. I thought the best and briefest characterization came from Ombuddy Philip Berenbroick of Arlington, Va., who saw ESPN’s decision as an example of “the dueling journalism and profit motives [via protecting valued partners] at the network.” It’s hard to argue with that depiction. NYT ESPN’s divorce with PBS came a week after the NFL voiced its displeasure with the documentary at a lunch between league and ESPN executives, according to two people with direct knowledge of the situation. The meeting took place at Patroon, near the league’s Midtown Manhattan headquarters, according to the two people, who requested anonymity because they were prohibited by their superiors from discussing the matter publicly. It was a table for four: Roger Goodell, commissioner of the NFL; Steve Bornstein, president of the NFL Network; John Skipper, ESPN’s president; and John Wildhack, ESPN’s executive vice president for production. Deadline Hollywood The League Of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis trailer was screened at an Aug. 6 media panel and unveiled without Skipper’s or ESPN’s approval. Skipper complained the video was “sensational” and made him “quite unhappy.” He didn’t like the tagline, “Get ready to change the way you see the game,” or the trailer’s final quote from a neuropathologist on the extent of brain injuries in the NFL, “I’m really wondering if every single football player doesn’t have this.” Media watchers say pressure from the NFL led to ESPN’s sudden withdrawal and now Skipper admits he was embarrassed by the Frontline documentary. HuffPost In the wake of a report that ESPN bowed out of a joint investigative project with PBS on NFL player concussions, the union representing players said it was a “disappointing day for journalism” if the sports network caved on the series out of business concerns. “I think any time that business interests get in the way of telling an important story like the one Frontline was working on, I think that that’s a sad day, regardless of why or who or what the circumstances were,” George Atallah, spokesman for the NFL Players Association, told HuffPost. CJR / Full-Court Press Whatever the case, it looks bad for both parties. The NFL is being sued over its decades of “Don’t worry, it’s just a bruise” approach to medicine, a personal-injury lawsuit that has expanded to some 4,500 plaintiffs. Reports of the kind broadcast by ESPN and PBS not only damage the league’s brand equity, but have the potential to inflict further direct damages in existing and potential lawsuits. That’s not the sort of benefits promised by a broadcast partner when it agrees to pay more than a billion dollars in rights fees to the NFL.

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Robin Roberts to be Honored at ESPYS

Former ESPN anchor and current Good Morning America host Robin Roberts will be honored with the Arthur Ashe Courage Award at the 2013 ESPYS in Los Angels on July 17.

The award is presented annually to “individuals whose contributions transcend sports,” and Roberts definitely fits the bill.

In the past six years, Roberts has battled and defeated not only breast cancer but myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a rare blood disorder.  Roberts was able to bring public awareness to both diseases during her fight and recovery. After five months off following a bone marrow transplant from her sister, Roberts returned to GMA last month.

“Robin brings an amazing amount of energy, compassion and determination to everything she does.  Those qualities made her an incredible asset during her time here at ESPN, and they have served her well as she battled the terrible health challenges that she’s had to face,” said ESPN president John Skipper. “Robin’s accomplishments in so many areas – as an athlete, a broadcaster, a cancer survivor and more – demonstrate her ability to shine regardless of adversity and we could not be more proud to honor her as the recipient of this year’s Arthur Ashe Courage Award.”

The 2o13 ESPYS will take place once again from the Nokia Theatre at L.A. Live.

ESPN Locks Up Rose Bowl Rights Through 2026

The Rose Bowl will remain on ESPN through 2026 after the sports cable network reached a 12-year extension with the Pasadena Tournament of Roses, the Big Ten Conference and the Pac-12 Conference. The new agreement begins in 2015.

The New Year’s Day tradition will continued to be played at 5 p.m. ET/2 p.m. PT on January 1 (and January 2 when January 1 falls on a Sunday).

“The Rose Bowl Game is one of sport’s most meaningful and celebrated events,” ESPN president John Skipper said in a statement. “Extending our relationship long term with such a prestigious brand will play a significant role in the way fans continue to define ESPN – as the leading destination for college football all year long.”

ESPN Would Like to Reinterpret the Word ‘Live’ to Mean ‘As it Happens’

espn.jpgNo time like the present (or the present minus 12 hours if we’re going by NBC‘s clock). Hot on the heels of the peacock network’s enormous success at the Beijing Games, ESPN has declared its interest in obtaining the television rights to the 2014 and 2016 Olympics. The key? They say they would actually broadcast the sports as they were happening and not, say, twelve hours later after the results have hit every other air wave, whilst NBC minions worked desperately to keep any and all clips off the darn Internets. Says John Skipper, ESPN’s executive vice president for content:

Our DNA is different than theirs, we serve sports fans. It’s hard in our culture to fathom tape-delaying in the same way they have. I’m not suggesting it wasn’t the smart thing for them to do, but it’s not our culture.
Of course, by the 2014 Games (to be held in Sochi, Russia) television as we know it may no longer exist, having dovetailed completely with the Internet, making delayed broadcasting an entirely moot point. But it’s always good to think ahead.