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Posts Tagged ‘Jonathan Franzen’

The New Yorker Chooses 9/11 for First e-Book

We’re not quite sure how much of an audience there is for e-books, but The New Yorker is certainly grabbing some attention with its first venture into the territory. The Cutline reports that the magazine’s first e-book — titled After 9/11 — will center on 9/11, and features writing that will make it attractive to readers:

[The book] includes vignettes from the magazine’s trademark ‘Talk of the Town’ section by Hendrik Hertzberg, John Updike, Jonathan Franzen, Susan Sontag, Calvin Trillin and George Packer; deeply reported features by Adam Gopnik, Seymour Hersh, Jane Mayer, Jon Lee Anderson and Steve Coll; criticism by Malcolm Gladwell; and fiction by Don DeLillo. It also includes Nicholas Schmidles recent account of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

The New Yorker’s Deputy Editor, Pam McCarthy, said that if the book is successful, the magazine will look to do more.

After 9/11 is available for $7.99 on the Kindle or Nook.

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Jennifer Egan Among LA Times Book Prize Winners

The LA Times announced the winners of its 2010 Book Prize over the weekend. Included among the winners was author Jennifer Egan, who spoke critically about the Times earlier this month in an interview, after a Times story detailing her Pulitzer victory included a photo of Jonathan Franzen instead of her. Critics, including Egan, accused the Times of sexism in picturing an established male author instead of the triumphant, emerging female author. Guess Egan’s over it, because unlike several other winners, she was at the event to accept her award.

Full list of winners after the jump.

Previously on Fishbowl LA: Jennifer Egan Responds to LA Times Photo Snub

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The New Yorker’s Facebook Presence Grows Slightly

Last Monday, The New Yorker decided to beg for Facebook fans by placing a Jonathan Franzen piece behind its Facebook page. The strategy – only letting those who ‘liked’ the Facebook page read the article – was odd and left FishbowlNY wondering if getting fans in such a way would cheapen the brand.

We’re still not sure about that, but we now know just how much The New Yorker gained from that experiment: The magazine added 16,000 fans to its page, or a growth of about eight percent.

Not that much, right? Either people thought the tactic was cheap, or they thought a Franzen article wasn’t worth the news feed spam that they’d encounter from The New Yorker once they were a fan. Either way, people appear to dislike (see what we did there?) the idea of the Facebook Wall.

The New Yorker Asks for ‘Likes’ to View Content

Just how much do you enjoy the writing of Jonathan Franzen? The New Yorker is hoping its enough to “like” its Facebook page, because according to Mashable, that’s the only way you can view a new Franzen piece. A spokesperson for the magazine says the article is on its Facebook page because “We want to engage with people who want to engage on a deeper level.”

There are a couple problems with this. Forcing people to interact with your brand isn’t the best way to gain their engagement, and even if tons of people do like the page, does that actually lead to anything good? We’re not so sure.

FishbowlNY “likes” Nutella on Facebook, but that doesn’t mean we buy it more than a person who doesn’t “like” it does. We should add however, that if you don’t like – as in, enjoy – Nutella, you are probably sad all the time.

Hopefully this will be a one time thing for The New Yorker, because it just strikes us as odd and a bit cheesy.

Jennifer Egan Responds to LA Times Photo Snub

Last month the LA Times kicked up a well-deserved feminist firestorm when they ran a photo of author Jonathan Franzen above a story about how novelist Jennifer Egan had just won the prestigious National Book Critics Circle Award. Franzen had supposedly been the favorite to win and the Times claimed they couldn’t dig up a recent photo of Egan–even though they covered the even in person.

Egan addresses the Times’ snafu in an interview with Entertainment Weekly and took the issue head on.

It was funny; by the time I knew of the brouhaha, it seemed to have taken on a life of its own. In a way, whatever aggravation I might have felt was preempted by the fact that so many other people were incensed on my behalf! I did think that the Times’ excuse — “We didn’t have a picture of her” — was a bit Old Media. I mean, there are lots of pictures of all of us out there, and it takes all of a millisecond to find them. The outcry points to the intense frustration many people feel on behalf of female writers, and I’ve certainly shared that frustration at times. I think that all discussions of this sort are useful — messy and awkward though they may be. I guess I’m a believer in open airing of collective grievances, rather than private seething.

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LA Times Called Out by Readers for Sexist Photo Flap

Last week, the National Book Critics Circle awarded “A Visit From the Goon Squad” by novelist Jennifer Egan its highly-touted prize for fiction. It was a huge honor for Egan’s work, but you really wouldn’t know it from glancing at the LA Times’ website. Alongside its writeup of the awards ceremony, the Times chose to run a shot of Jonathan Franzen–who’s novel “Freedom” was arguably the favorite to pick up the award–instead of Egan.

Times readers weren’t having it.

“Seriously? Seriously???,” one wrote. “The news is that literary darling Jonathan Franzen LOST an award, not that (talented but less well-known female) Jennifer Egan WON? Please spend a couple of minutes gazing into your editorial navels today and ask yourselves what happened.”

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