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Posts Tagged ‘Journey’

Writers Can Pitch Any Section at Journey

Journey is a bimonthly magazine that covers travel, both between states and international, in a manner that appeals to residents of Washington and other Northwestern states. With 75 percent of its content penned by freelancers, the pub is always looking for writers who can identify with the AAA publication’s readers.

“There are certain angles that make sense for a Northwestern audience and others that don’t,” explained editor-in-chief Rob Bhatt.

He also stressed that the publication likes destination pieces that don’t leave anyone out on the fun. ”We’re more of an experiential market than a luxury, high-end shopping audience,” he said.

For more details on which sections are ripe for pitching, How To Pitch: Journey.

Nicholas Braun

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Hit The Road To Publish Your Journey

Do all these balmy not-even-spring-yet temperatures have you daydreaming about vacays and road trips? Well, if your story is an interesting one, it could net you $1/word at AAA’s  exclusive publication, Journey.

Because Journey is a regional publication, editor-in-chief Nicole Meoli‘s first priority is to hire local writers to offer an insider perspective on the mag’s home turf. “The main stable of writers I work with are from Washington [state],” she said. However, she’s not opposed to working with freelancers from further away, as long as they bring locally relevant ideas to the table.

For more on breaking into the magazine’s feature well, read How To Pitch: Journey. [sub req'd]

Hit the Road to Publish Your Journey

Does the approach of spring have you daydreaming about vacays and road trips? Well, if your story is an interesting one, it could net you $1/word at AAA’s exclusive publication, Journey.

Because Journey is a regional publication, editor-in-chief Nicole Meoli‘s first priority is to hire local writers to offer an insider perspective on the mag’s home turf. “The main stable of writers I work with are from Washington [state],” she said. However, she’s not opposed to working with Cali freelancers, as long as they bring locally relevant ideas to the table.

For more on breaking into the magazine’s feature well, read How To Pitch: Journey. [sub req'd]

Journey Whacks Singer; ‘Don’t Stop Believin’ Climbing iTunes Charts

journey_061207.jpgBelievin’

Thanks to its Sopranos-ending, scene-stealing inclusion, Journey is back in the spotlight for the first time since, well, 1981′s “Don’t Stop Believin’” was released. Everyone from MTV News to the Associated Press came calling for quotes after Sunday’s finale, and the aformentioned song is climbing the iTunes charts (currently No. 30 on the iTunes’ “Top Songs” list, right between Bone-Thugs-n-Harmony and T.I.) and #55 on Amazon.

The power ballad purveyors seem to be thoroughly enjoying the attention. All of which makes the timing of this announcement curious:

JOURNEY ANNOUNCES DEPARTURE OF JEFF SCOTT SOTO

June 12, 2007 — Journey has parted ways with their recently named lead singer Jeff Scott Soto. Jeff’s first appearance with Journey was July 7, 2006 in Bristow, VA. He had been filling in for Steve Augeri, who had to leave the tour shortly after it began on June 23 due to illness. Jeff’s last performance was May 12, 2007 in Leesburg, VA.

Read more

The Sopranos Didn’t End — It Stopped

The final frame

Well, you can forget the “Will Tony Survive?” question. David Chase and co. over at HBO decided to leave its fans and eight years of makeshift Italian Sunday dinners on the edge of an overwrought, overused classic rock cliché (Journey sang “Don’t Stop Believin’”) — an ending that you had to write. You are, after all, the person of the year. (Fitting, too, since — as the waiting room copy of Departures in the finale can attest — HBO’s writers love magazines.)

And, of course, the non-ending ending left an opening for the long-rumored Sopranos movie.

Selected Sopranos coverage:

  • Nikki Finke: This is why America hates Hollywood. The line to cancel HBO starts here.

  • Salon: We may try to hate Tony, but our love for the careworn killer wins out. It’s that moral perversity, in the age of Bush, that I’ll miss most about The Sopranos, writes Gary Kamina.
  • Variety: The final episode, no matter how you slice it, presented Tony Soprano as a winner, a decisive leader who refuses to tolerate indecision over all else.
  • LAT: It was an ending that, if nothing else, had millions on their feet.
  • Washington Post‘s Tom Shales: It may have been the greatest double-take — by the audience — in the history of American television.
  • NY Sun: Not many fans can be satisfied with the outcome of the series after eight years of emotional investment.
  • Daily News: Did they enjoy dinner together? Or were they wiped out in a hail of bullets? The answer is unclear.

EARLIER:

  • Will Tony Survive?