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Posts Tagged ‘Julia Turner’

Slate Names Dan Kois Culture Editor

Dan Kois GSlate has named Dan Kois its new culture editor. Kois, a senior editor at Slate, was most recently editor of the site’s Book Review section. He is also a contributor to The New York Times Magazine.

As the founding editor of New York’s culture blog, Vulture, Kois has plenty of pop culture chops. His work has also appeared in The New York Times, The Awl, Oxford American and Television Without Pity.

Julia Turner, Slate’s new editor-in-chief, announced Kois’ appointment on Twitter.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: World Cup Sets Ratings Records | Plotz Resigns From Slate

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World Cup Shatters Facebook Engagement Records (LostRemote)
The World Cup set single-event Facebook engagement records within the tournament’s first week. Now, with the tournament over, it is official: the 2014 World Cup is the most talked-about event in Facebook history. From June 12-July 13, 350 million people generated 3 billion World Cup-related interactions. AllFacebook These numbers make the 2014 World Cup the most-talked-about sporting event in the social network’s history. The tournament’s final match, which resulted in 280 million interactions from 88 million users, was the top sporting event in Facebook’s history. Capital New York All told, 26.5 million people watched the match Sunday via either ABC or Univision, making it the most-watched men’s World Cup final ever. ABC drew an average of 17.3 million viewers according to Nielsen Fast National ratings, the best numbers ever for a World Cup final, and the third best for any World Cup game. The two games that beat it were U.S.-Portugal from earlier in this year’s tournament (18.2 million viewers), and the 1999 Women’s final between the U.S. and China (17.9 million viewers). Deadline Hollywood Both ABC/ESPN and Univision had their best World Cup ever this year, with ESPN/ABC up 39 percent in viewership over the 2010 World Cup and up 96 percent over the 2006 World Cup. Over the 64 games of this year’s tournament, Univision was up 34 percent from its total audience from 2010. Variety The combined 26.5 million for Germany’s 1-0 victory is a larger audience than the deciding game for the most recent World Series on Fox (19.2 million) and NBA Finals on ABC (18.0 million), and also tops the BCS Championship game in college football on ESPN in January (25.6 million).

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David Plotz Resigns as Editor of Slate

David Plotz, who has been with Slate since the site launched in 1996, is stepping aside. Plotz had served as Slate’s editor since 2008. In a note, Plotz said he’ll remain an editor-at-large and continue to contribute to Slate’s Political Gabfest.

“But today, after 18 of the happiest, most satisfying years any journalist could ever have, I am stepping down as Slate’s editor,” wrote Plotz. “I’m not leaving for any secret reason. Maybe it’s the rule of six: Mike [Kinsley] edited Slate for six years. Jacob [Weisberg] edited Slate for six years. I’ve been editing Slate for six years, and I’m ready to try something new.”

Julia Turner will succeed Plotz as Slate’s editor.

[Image: Slate]

Elizabeth Banks Plays the Slate Podcast Game

It was a big night Tuesday at the Petersen Automotive Museum for Slate’s LA based audio-video producer Andy Bowers. For the first time since the website’s “The Culture Gabfest” podcast ramped up in 2008, the program’s sharp-witted gang hit town for a SoCal audience taping.

FishbowlLA was in attendance as deputy editor Julia Turner, film critic Dana Stevens and critic at large Stephen Metcalf discussed the recent Mike Daisey-“This American Life” controversy, Zooey Deschanel‘s pixie-ish charms and the blockbuster adaptation of The Hunger Games. Joining the trio on stage for the last topic was the film’s co-star Elizabeth Banks, who proved to be a very fun participant and helped close out the show’s “personal endorsements” segment with a shout-out for graphic novels.

Bowers, once with NPR, still works out of the public radio network’s Culver City facilities, where he now rents space. Tuesday night’s event, co-presented by Zocalo Public Square, offered the unique pleasure of listening to an Internet podcast while surrounded by vintage cars from the days when vehicles had no radios. Among the second floor stunners flanking the Slate journalists was a shiny black 1949 Alfa Romeo Villa D’Este, the only known such model to exist in the U.S.

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Slate Launches ‘MySlate’

It’s easy to get bogged down with too much information when you spend all day online. You start out wanting to read about Greece’s new austerity measures and halfway through you check Twitter, find an article on the “alluring” dung beetle dance, and next thing you know you’re emailing your friends a beer ad featuring gyrating penguins.

Slate understands this process, and to help clear the online clutter it has launched “MySlate,” which is basically a personalized version of the site.

MySlate allows you to set up a custom layout featuring your favorite writers and sections on Slate. You’ll also be alerted to new content and comments, have access to a personalized newsletter and be able to save articles for later.

“We’re tremendously excited about the launch of MySlate,” said Julia Turner, Deputy Editor of Slate. “Giving our readers the option to read exactly the Slate they want — a Slate just for them — will lead to an even deeper kinship with our already loyal and fantastically dedicated readers.”

MySlate is a great idea to simplify browsing. You can get started on creating your custom layout here. Or you could keep reading Corin Nemec’s wiki page. Your choice.

Slate’s Top Right: A Gathering of The Best

Like most the Internet world, FishbowlNY loves a good list. From the ridiculous New York Observer Power Couple list to the top 10 most looked-up words on The New York Times’ website, if there’s some sort of ranking happening, we’re checking it out. We might not always like them (grocery lists, Power Rankings for “Becker” seasons, etc.) but we always read them.

One of the latest ranking features that we’ve come to love is Slate’s Top Right. Launched in late July, the feature seeks to bring together a list of 25 Americans – divided into categories like “Culture,” “Business,” and “Technology,” with five people in each – who are coming up with not just brilliant, but useful, ideas.

The name  Top Right comes from the quadrant graph, made popular by New York’s Approval Matrix, so those who are on this list are the best of the best. To make the list really pop, there are people you’ve heard of (Jack Dorsey) and some relatively unknowns who deserve to become known (Salman Khan).

Julia Turner, Slate’s Deputy Editor at the site’s New York headquarters, told FishbowlNY that the idea for Top Right came about when they decided that there was a void in the world of lists and rankings.

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