TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Keith Fox’

BusinessWeek’s New Hires Include New York Magazine Steal

zooooom.jpgSo the exciting news today is the new Bloomberg LP-owned BusinessWeek, which laid off so many back in October, now officially includes some big-name new hires, the biggest of which may be Hugo Lindgren as executive editor.

Bloomberg BusinessWeek‘s steal of New York magazine’s editorial director is surprising, as Lindgren was Adam Moss‘ right hand man. He’ll begin his new role on March 8.

Also on the Josh Tyrangiel-assembled dream team is Eric Pooley, formerly managing editor of Fortune, who will be taking on the position of deputy editor at Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Ellen Pollock and Ciro Scotti remain the two holdovers from the original magazine to round out the top editorial roster.

Of the staffing announcements made today, Slate‘s James Ledbetter said, “It’s a little like the reuniting of a rock supergroup,” but adds, “it’s not necessarily what the publication truly needs.”

Can’t hurt the image though, after the beating the business magazine took when top editors like John Byrne and Stephen Adler, and president Keith Fox, dropped out of BW once Bloomberg bought it.

Read More: The BusinessWeek Supergroup –Slate

BW names exec editor, deputy editor in first move by new chief — Talking Biz News

Previously: John Byrne BusinessWeek Departure Rumors Turn True, More Employees Fleeing BusinessWeek?

Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: The Year’s Biggest Moves In Media

door.jpgThis year — full of flux and uncertainty about where the media is heading — has resulted in a vast number of job changes and departures across all matter of media companies and publications. In almost every field of journalism, big names have either been fired, promoted, retired, or simply moved on to more lucrative positions. Here, we take a look back at the biggest industry shakeups of 2009.

The Biggest Move in Magazines: Stephen Adler leaving BusinessWeek.
When editor Stephen Adler announced his departure from BusinessWeek this October following the magazine’s sale to Bloomberg LP, he wasn’t just making a statement, he was starting a trend. Soon he was followed by some of his former colleagues, like John Byrne and BusinessWeek‘s president Keith Fox, who decided to stay with magazine’s original parent, McGraw-Hill. (Not to mention all of those who involuntarily left the pub not long after.) It takes a lot of chutzpah to up and quit your editor gig in the middle of this turbulent media landscape, it takes even more to get your coworkers to come with you. Fortunately for Adler, he’s already landed another gig at Thomson Reuters.

Runners Up: Time.com managing editor Josh Tyrangiel comes on board as editor at Businessweek; Marie Claire‘s publisher Susan Plagemann joins Vogue; Nancy Berger Cardone of shuttered Gourmet takes Plagemann’s spot at Marie Claire; Janice Min leaves Us Weekly; Mariette DiChristina becomes Scientific American‘s first female editor-in-chief.

More after the jump

Read more

Bloomberg Names New BusinessWeek President

bloombergbw.jpgIt’s been a roller coaster for BusinessWeek since Bloomberg LP bought it in October. After a slew of layoffs and high level voluntary departures, the new Bloomberg BusinessWeek has finally hit newsstands and now the magazine has a new president.

Today, Bloomberg announced the appointment of Paul Bascobert as president of the new Bloomberg BusinessWeek, replacing Keith Fox, who announced in October that he would be staying at former BusinessWeek publisher McGraw-Hill after the magazine moved to its new owner.

Bascobert joins the magazine from News Corp.-owned Dow Jones & Co., where he was chief marketing officer for the company’s Consumer Media Group. He’s had a unique path for a media executive, starting his career as an engineer at car manufacturer GM, and moving on to work in operations, sales and marketing for a number of companies before joining Dow Jones in 2006.

“Within Dow Jones, Paul is known as a collaborative manager who has driven growth across multiple platforms and business units while controlling expenses,” said Norman Pearlstine, Bloomberg BusinessWeek‘s chairman. “His impressive accomplishments coupled with his vision make him Bloomberg BusinessWeek‘s ideal leader.”

Full release after the jump

Previously: BusinessWeek Prez Steps Down From May, Stays On At McGraw-Hill

Read more

John Byrne BusinessWeek Departure Rumors Turn True

johnbyrne .jpgWhen false reports of the deaths of Lady Gaga or Jeff Goldblum get blasted all over Twitter, it becomes a trend piece in The New York Times. “The Internet Who Cried Wolf” serves as a gentle reminder that not everything you read online is true.

The media equivalent of course, would be Anna Wintour‘s departure from Vogue. There have been so many rumors, sworn testimonies and first-hand accounts of the editrix leaving Condé Nast that sometimes it seems like she’s hanging on there just to spite the morning’s headlines.

But recently, the magazine departure watchdogs have had a new person of interest: BusinessWeek.com‘s editor-in-chief John Byrne. Except this time, the gossipers were right. Turns out, Byrne is leaving the Bloomberg LP-owned business magazine to launch a digital media company in San Francisco.

Read more

Bloomberg Starts To Put Together BusinessWeek Staff

businessweek_3.pngToday’s New York Times “Media Decoder” blog post about the restructuring of BusinessWeek post-Bloomberg LP‘s acquisition has a funny ring to it. We already know that editor Stephen Adler is stepping down, as well as president Keith Fox. So who will be manning the new magazine?

Apparently, the people who decided to stick around. But, unless you’re reading carefully, you’d never know it. The Times mentions Bloomberg “has selected a few staff members to make the leap to Bloomberg BusinessWeek,” but you can’t tell right away if those staffers are from the magazine or Bloomberg. Except if you are intimately familiar with the BusinessWeek masthead.

The “new” magazine editors — Ellen Pollock, John Byrne, and Ciro Scotti — are actually just continuing in their former positions. (Mainly, it seems like the story is just there to address rumors of Pollock and Byrne’s departures.) Jessica Sibley, who came in to help the ailing magazine in the role of senior vice president and worldwide publisher back in February of 2008 will be the new magazine’s publisher as Fox stays behind at McGraw-Hill. The Times post is titled “Bloomberg Builds a Staff For BusinessWeek” but it should really be “Bloomberg Announces Who’s Decided Not To Leave.”

Someone who is leaving — Roger Neal, the current general manager of BusinessWeek.com. His staff will now report to Bloomberg’s Kevin Krim.

Also of note: All BusinessWeek employees will be moving to Bloomberg headquarters on December 4, unless they already work in New York, in which case they can stay at their former offices until the Bloomberg building has room for them.

Memo to BusinessWeek staffers after the jump.

Read more

BusinessWeek Prez Steps Down From Mag, Stays On At McGraw-Hill

Keith_Fox.jpgWe made it through almost a whole week without any other higher-ups dipping out of BusinessWeek now that it’s been bought by Bloomberg LP. But nothing good lasts forever, especially not in the world of business magazines, and today BusinessWeek president Keith Fox announced he is stepping down from his position.

Unlike the other staffers who have jumped ship since news about the sale broke mid-October, Fox will be staying on with the magazine’s former publisher, McGraw-Hill.

Fox’s official statement about his departure, after the jump.

Read more

And BusinessWeek Goes To: Bloomberg LP

businessweek cover 1012.jpg After weeks of speculation, Bloomberg LP just announced that it has agreed to acquire BusinessWeek from McGraw-Hill Cos.

Bloomberg, a late entrant into the bidding for the business weekly, did not disclose terms of the deal.

There had been some speculation last week that, if Bloomberg were to acquire BusinessWeek, the magazine’s staff might be dumped and replaced by the current staff of Bloomberg Markets magazine. Although the press release that just went out about the deal didn’t address any staffing decisions yet, it did note that Bloomberg’s chief content officer Norman Pearlstine has now been named chairman of BusinessWeek.

“Norm’s role will ensure that we fully capitalize on the combined strengths of Bloomberg and BusinessWeek,” said Matthew Winkler, editor-in-chief of Bloomberg News.

We’ll keep you updated as this story progresses. Know anything? Let us know.

Full release after the jump.

Update: BusinessWeek‘s own “On Media” column reports that Bloomberg likely offered $2 to $5 million in cash for the magazine and “has agreed to assume liabilities, including potential severance payments.” Added reporter Tom Lowry, “It remains to be seen how much of the magazine’s 400-plus staff Bloomberg plans to cut, but reports of a planned scorched earth campaign are overblown, say sources.”

Another update: BusinessWeek Publisher Keith Fox‘s memo to the magazine’s staff: “While the ink is barely dry and the long-term plans are being worked out, we do know that Bloomberg is committed to and values our brand, our editorial integrity, and our ability to drive advertising, circulation, and new digital revenue.”

Earlier: Down To The Wire At BusinessWeek

Read more