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Posts Tagged ‘Kim France’

Kim France on Launching Lucky: ‘It was terrifying’

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Kim France has had the unique experience of starting a magazine from scratch. Back in 1999, Conde Nast hired France to launch a magazine about shopping. They called it Lucky.

“It’s a very rare and unusual privilege to get to start a magazine,” France says. “It doesn’t happen every day or even every month or year…It was incredibly thrilling. It was also quite terrifying.”

Check out the video after the jump for more from France, including how she started her new fashion blog, Girls of a Certain Age.

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Profit From Your Passion in 2014

Profit-From-Your-Passion-tv-150We at Mediabistro have always been huge advocates of doing what you love — whether it’s breaking free of your ho-hum job in corporate law to work for magazines, like Brides‘ editor-in-chief Keija Minor did, or turning a passion for the written word into a lucrative novel- and TV-writing career (before the age of 25, no less, in Kara Taylor‘s case). And we aim to inspire — which is why we’re bringing back our Profit From Your Passion series. Each week in January, we’ll offer tips on how to pitch such prestigious pubs as the The Saturday Evening Post, give you a step-by-step strategy on how to perfect your book proposal, and share the secrets to success from media pros like Lucky founding editor Kim France, HollywoodLife’s Bonnie Fuller, and Dave Ramsey, finance guru, TV personality and author. Whether you desire a job in magazines, digital media, book publishing or TV/entertainment, now’s the time to pursue your dream. To whet your appetite, our first feature is How to Become a Six-Figure Freelancer. Yes, it is possible. See the full “Profit From Your Passion” lineup after the jump.

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Racked Adds Feature Writer, Photographer

While the acquisition of the Curbed sites by Vox Media has received the lion’s share of media attention, there is also a lot going on at Racked, the fashion network that along with Eater was also part of the deal. Racked encompasses a national site and regional verticals for New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Chicago, Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

ChavieLieberThe national site, run out of an office in the East Village alongside the group that operates the New York vertical, is adding Chavie Lieber (pictured) as its first full-time feature writer. Photographer Driely Vieira meanwhile is being bumped up at the beginning of next month to Racked full-time status. She will contribute to both the New York and national sites.

Racked founder, national editor Leslie Price, who launched the site in 2007, is excited about these and other forthcoming changes. She is based out of Miami, where she returned this summer after helping oversee and grow the west coast end of Racked.

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Where Does Lucky Shakeup Leave Kim France?

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From left: Brandon Holley, Kim France

The magazine and fashion worlds are buzzing this morning with the news that Conde Nast alum Brandon Holley has been named editor-in-chief of Lucky.

Holley was most recently the editor for Yahoo’s female-focused Shine channel and also presided over cult favorite Jane before it shuttered in 2007. According to WWD, she’ll now be tasked with expanding Lucky “across multiple platforms.”

But here’s the big question: What happened to former EIC Kim France?

“This is a decision we came to together,” Conde Nast editorial director Tom Wallace said. “Kim France created a brand and not many people in this business can say that. Conde Nast owes her a lot.”

And it seems France has only nice things to say about her employer as well. “I am exceptionally grateful to Conde Nast and Si Newhouse for what has been a tremendous opportunity, and something I will remember with only fondness,” she later said via statement.

And as usually happens with media’s revolving door, there’s already speculation about who may follow France out the door. NBC New York has its eyes on creative director Andrea Linett as the next to bounce.

Well, congrats to Holley and a big shout-out to France as well. Regardless of the reasons for her exit, a 10-year reign as founding editor isn’t too shabby.

Lucky Gets Interactive

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Forget iPhone apps, magazines are starting to develop more interactive ways to get readers involved in the content on the page and keep them coming back to the magazine after checking in on their smartphone or computer.

One huge example we saw of this recently was the augmented reality content offered up by Esquire and InStyle at the end of last year. Now shopping magazine Lucky is testing the waters with an interactive application of its own. Starting with its March issue, on newsstands next week, Lucky‘s editorial and advertising pages will feature a Microsoft Tag — a black and white bar code like symbol that, when photographed by a Web-enabled smartphone, will direct a reader to additional content like videos featuring Lucky editors.

The March issue will have six editorial tags among its pages, and Lacoste and Bing ads will have tags that will take readers to the Web.

“At Lucky we don’t believe in using cutting-edge technology just for the point of using it,” editor-in-chief Kim France said in a statement about the new technology. “This one makes so much sense because it is incredibly intuitive and useful for our readers.”

Related: Preview Esquires‘s Augmented Reality

Lucky Loses Local Editions; Esquire Pans for Gold in Dubai

luckymag820.jpgWWD reports Lucky will no longer publish regional editions of the magazine. Slowly shedding the city-specific shopping guides since 2004, the Condé title will cease regional editions for Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami and San Francisco by November, and will eliminate the NYC edition by January 2010. Editor-in-chief Kim France said, “After thorough research and evaluation of the continuing effectiveness of the regional editions, it was decided that they had served their purpose and that we would not be hurt by eliminating them.”
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Meanwhile, half a world away, Esquire will try its luck in the Middle East: Hearst plans to launch an English-language edition in Dubai with publishing partner ITP. With an initial print run of 15,000, it will become the 18th international version of the men’s mag.

How Sassy Book Authors Conducted Research

sassy_kurt_courtney.jpgMarisa Meltzer and Kara Jesella, the duo behind How Sassy Changed My Life, spent two years writing their ode to the late, great teen glossy that spawned the careers of editors-cum-personalities Jane Pratt (Jane), Christina Kelly (ElleGirl) and Kim France (Lucky) among others. But lest you think they spent that time chewing Bubblelicious and buying shoes, the pair did some serious research:

Meltzer: We spent a few days in the New York Public Library, which has its “Teen Central,” in the branch across from MOMA. It has this loft where teens hang out, they play teen music, with a giant neon sign that says “Teen Central.” They have this room… It’s actually kind of cute because there are actually teens doing their homework — ok, they’re flirting, they aren’t really doing their homework, and they have this glass room where they have almost the entire Seventeen archives. I think October 1975 is missing, but everything else is there.

Jesella: It’s funny because we found the ones from 1988, that were from right before Sassy launched, literally all stories were about getting married. It was like “How could this have existed?” Sassy did change things so dramatically, and it wasn’t totally clear until we saw what we had been reading before.

  • Book Keeping: Authors Uncover Sassy’s Rise and Fall [mediabistro.com]
  • Lucky’s Kim France Avoids Personal Pronouns: Magazine World Reels

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    Glossed Over does the heavy lifting: the site picks apart beauty/fashion magazines in an amusing, yet feral way. We’ve learned so much by reading the site, for example, in February’s Lucky:

    In a shocking departure from the self-obsession that normally permeates her monthly missives, Kim France does not mention herself once in the February edition. In fact, she completely refrains from using “me” or “I” at all, and she uses “we” only to indicate the entire Lucky staff.

    And we loved this because we hate Kim France, her self-obsession and her hair. Why do editors insist on running a photo when they’re not remotely photogenic? (Don’t bother writing us about how nice she is–we don’t care.)

    Allure, Glamor, and Bazaar are also skewered, but delicately.

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