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Posts Tagged ‘Kyle Smith’

Catching Up with America’s ‘Third Most Hating Film Critic’

When Vocativ recently parsed Metacritic data to rank U.S. film critics that disagreed most frequently with the general flow of consensus, the Wall Street Journal‘s Joe Morgenstern ranked as the country’s “Most Hating” reviewer, followed by the New Yorker‘s Anthony Lane. Third was the New York Post‘s Kyle Smith, who spoke about all this with Kurt Andersen on the latest of edition of Studio 360.

Smith said he was honored to be in the same bottom-three category as Morgenstern and Lane. He also defended his negative reviews of American Hustle and Philomena:

“The average Metacritic score for Philomena was a 76,” said Andersen. “You gave it a 25. You hated it for political reasons, or cinematic reasons?”

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NYFCC Verdicts: Armond White Expelled; Lou Lumenick Suspended

ArmondWhiteTwitterAvatarThe craziest film-journalist group kerfuffle this side of a Hollywood Foreign Press Association rumble has been brought to a swift and resolute close.

At a special emergency meeting today of the New York Film Critics Circle (NYFCC), it was decided that Armond White is to be expelled for his miscreant behavior at the organization’s recent annual awards gala. White continues to adamantly deny the accusations, even though there is corroborating audio and no one else has come forward to take ownership of the muttered comments about the filmmaker who accepted last night’s Best Drama Golden Globe.

Here’s the NYFCC statement issued today, via THR:

“The New York Film Critics Circle deeply regrets any embarrassment caused its guests or honorees by any member’s recent actions,” said Stephen Whitty, critic for the Star-Ledger and the group’s new chair. “Sadly, disciplinary measures had to be taken, to prevent any re-occurrence. We apologize again to our guests and look forward to the rest of 2014 and our 80th anniversary.”

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East Coast Critic: Have Oscars Jumped the Shark?

Far from the madding, furiously handicapping Oscar blogger crowd, the view of the AMPAS membership’s elderly tendencies is a little different. This morning, New York Post film critic Kyle Smith rips the ratings prospects for the upcoming ABC telecast, and really, it’s hard to argue with him.

For the first time since 1929, a silent film is not just in the Best Picture Oscar mix but also the presumed winner. For Smith, this translates into the sound of crickets:

The Oscar nominations spoke yesterday, and they said, “Shh!” ABC’s response? “Sh – - !” The list made it clear that the February 26 ceremony will be among the least-watched editions of the collapsing telecast.

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Blogger Bashes Fuzzy Midnight Math

It’s always been a major bone of contention at FishbowlLA, so we’re glad to see someone else take up the battle cry against the routine practice of failing to adjust for box office inflation.

Ed Driscoll, San Jose editor and political producer for Pajamas Media, notes that the Hollywood Reporter, IFC, and Entertainment Weekly have all been guilty of parroting figures for Woody Allen‘s summer hit Midnight in Paris without placing the numbers in a proper historical context. Only a few journalists, he argues, are digging down to the real story, like the New York Post‘s Kyle Smith in a July 9 blog item:

Annie Hall grossed $38.3 million–in 1977. That’s the equivalent of $143 million today. Midnight in Paris is nowhere near being Woody Allen’s biggest hit. Why does Sony Pictures Classics care? Because they want to be able to run print and (later) DVD ads proclaiming that this is Woody Allen’s biggest hit ever.

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Studios Buzzing About Sundance Fight Club Doc

The Irish have a couple of very intriguing entries at Sundance this year. New York Post critic Kyle Smith is heaping some early praise on The Guard, an odd couple cop comedy starring Brendan Gleeson and Don Cheadle. He describes the film as a “a race-reversed 48 Hours in which the white guy gets to be funny and the black guy is the straight man.” Sounds promising.

The Guard was written and directed by John Michael McDonagh, the older brother of playwright Martin McDonagh. But arguably the more intriguing McDonagh siblings represented at Sundance this year are Michael and Hames Quinn, stars of the feature-length documentary Knuckle. Director Ian Palmer spent 12 years tracking the pair’s secretive Irish Traveler community and violent, bare-knuckle fighting matches.

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