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Posts Tagged ‘LA Weekly’

LA Weekly‘s “Lost” Riots Issue Now Online

But it can’t be found on the LA Weekly website. The issue is available for download through Los Angeles magazine, thanks to editor Mary Melton, who scanned the May 8, 1992 issue after the LA Weekly claimed the paper hadn’t covered the riots 20 years ago.

   

To date, the aforementioned LA Weekly blog post remains fiercely critical of the paper’s coverage in ’92, despite the revelation that they missed an entire issue dedicated to the riots, one they confess to not having read. Why a newspaper would choose trashing its own legacy over re-writing a blog post is beyond us.

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Venice Resident Filing Complaint Against Blogger

We admit it.

Sometimes bloggers can cross the line.

And sometimes we need to be put in check, like Venice Beach resident Karen Wolfe plans on doing to Venice Stakeholders Association president and blogger Mark Ryavec.

Ryavec (who sounds like a bit of a nutjob) listed the names and home addresses of 10 politicians, journalists and activists — including Wolfe — on his website as places where the homeless could set up camp and sleep overnight because he considered them advocates in the ongoing battle between Venice residents and transients.

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Wonkette Editor and LA Weekly Reporter Engage in Twitter Blood Sport

Wonkette’s editor and new owner Rebecca Schoenkopf got into a tiff Monday with LA Weekly staff reporter Dennis Romero over a Tweet containing a grammatical error. Then, thankfully, things snowballed.

This Fishie wandered into the flamewar a little late, and by then the catfight was in full swing. “You got butthurt,” Rebecca taunted Dennis, “Admit something for once in your life.” Dennis replied, “Glad to see I’m still in your thoughts. I, like the rest of the planet, had forgotten u exist.”

It was too juicy to ignore.  So we did a little digging and here, dear readers, is how journos bitch slap each other via the humble Tweet:


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Former Underage Prostitute Sold on Backpage.com: ‘Like Going Back to Slave Times’

The classified advertising website Backpage.com makes approximately $22 million a year from escort ads, and a portion of those ads are selling victims of human trafficking. Nicholas Kristof gave a voice to one of those victims in an op-ed for the New York Times, where he once again made the case for the website’s closure.

As a minor, ‘Alissa’ was trafficked by pimps on Backpage.com. Alissa was her street name; she told Kristof she didn’t want to use her real name for fear Village Voice Media, the owner of Backpage.com, would retaliate. And VVM has in the past used the editorial pages of their newspapers, including the LA Weekly, to mock critics.

Kristof acknowledges that sex trafficking is a complicated issue, that many of the prostitution ads on Backpage.com are placed by adult women of their own volition, and that simply closing down the site won’t make sex slavery go away. And sex workers have come forward to argue that closing Backpage.com would make prostitution more dangerous, not less.

But to a victim like Alissa, providing any forum for trafficking is unacceptable. “For a Web site like Backpage to make $22 million off our backs, it’s like going back to slave times.” she told Kristoff.

(Photo: Ashley Gilbertson/VII / The New York Times)

Village Voice Article on Underage Sex Trafficking Victim Includes Self-Serving Disclaimer

A 15-year-old girl was kidnapped, raped, and forced into prostitution by a group of New York pimps who advertised her services on Backpage.com, the classified ad site owned by Village Voice Media. It’s these kind of crimes that have critics calling for the closure of Backpage.com and VVM defending their profitable website by claiming underage sex trafficking is a rare phenomenon.

Even when reporting on the horrific crimes committed against the victim, the Village Voice promoted its own agenda via a strange disclaimer:

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Jonathan Gold Says Goodbye to Angeli Caffe

After 27 years, Evan Kleiman‘s Angeli Caffe closed its doors for good on Jan. 13. LA Weekly columnist and KCRW Good Food regular Jonathan Gold wrote a touching eulogy on Kleiman’s Melrose restaurant:

“The chilly Wednesday evening before Angeli Caffe closed for good, you could grab a bar seat at Pizzeria Mozza without waiting, and there were only two or three dudes in line at Pink’s hot dog stand. If you were ambling down Melrose on your way to a bite or a drink, you could have had your choice of any table at any restaurant on the usually crowded strip.

But Angeli was really crowded, astonishingly crowded, with people there to wish the restaurant well — longtime customers, mostly, some of them with college-age kids who had been going to Angeli since infancy: patting out floury balls of pizza dough as toddlers, graduating to roast chicken as children, perhaps having their first dates there as teens, knowing the mashed-potato croquettes and the gnocchi with brown butter and sage would never let them down.

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Cartoonist Patrick O’Connor Leaves LA Weekly

Two posts dedicated to cartoonists this week? (This has to be a record, right?)

LA Weekly staffer Patrick O’Connor is leaving his gig at the alternative weekly. O’Connor posted a farewell on his blog:

This week’s cartoon is my last print cartoon for the LA Weekly. I’ve been on staff since January of 2009 and it’s been an amazing experience. All the best to the Weekly and all the talented folks who put it together. We might continue to work together in another capacity….creating online creating animated shorts…but more about that later.

[H/T LA Observed]

Photojournalist Assaulted by LAPD Still Behind Bars

Freelance photographer Tyson Heder is still behind bars after he was assaulted and arrested during the Occupy LA raid early Wednesday morning.

Simone Wilson of the LA Weekly provided an update of the messy scene at the Metropolitan Detention Center:

The situation at the Metropolitan Detention Center — where photojournalist Heder and gobs of other arrestees are being held — is, by all accounts, total chaos.

“They’re all scheduled to be out of here by Friday, within the 48 hours,” says watch commander Sergeant Angelo. “Thats our goal.” But he adds that “there were so many bodies, so many people” that he can’t guarantee anything.

Heder’s attorney, Joe Singleton, says there’s a “big wait” at the detention center, where he’s trying to help Heder. “The court is having problems tracking down the right paperwork from the City Attorney’s office. They’re just trying to figure out what’s going on. Nobody’s told me anything.”

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Hungry? Jonathan Gold Has 99 Restaurants for You

Just in time for the weekend, LA Weekly foodie Jonathan Gold released his list of “99 Essential Restaurants” for 2011.

The question on Gold’s mind this go-round was “what is an essential Los Angeles restaurant?”:

I was thinking about that over lunch at Providence a couple of months ago, contemplating a dish of Santa Barbara sea urchin cosseted with gently scrambled egg, wondering whether the uni might go better with an Alsatian pinot blanc or a Central Coast viognier.

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LA Weekly Dumps Art Critic Doug Harvey

Regular freelance contributor Doug Harvey learned last week that the LA Weekly would no longer be a home for his writing. During his 13 years as an art critic for the paper, Harvey made significant contributions to the city’s arts coverage – and hopefully he will continue to do so elsewhere.

We’re not clear why the LA Weekly said farewell to Mr. Harvey, but it’s likely related to last month’s firing of Senior Features Editor Tom Christie, who edited the Arts section. As for whether the LA Weekly will be cutting down on arts coverage, or if they simply expect Christie’s replacement to bring in all new people, it’s a wait-and-see.

Photo swiped from Doug Harvey’s personal blog.

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