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Posts Tagged ‘Lisa Robinson’

Music Journo Never Got a Thank You from The Clash, Elvis Costello

ThereGoesGravityCoverW magazine contributor Catherine Hong has shared a fabulous preview of There Goes Gravity: A Life in Rock and Roll, the April 22 memoir from trailblazing female music journalist Lisa Robinson.

When the interview subject has the kind of stories that Robinson does, the Mick Jagger lede pretty much writes itself. Not to mention the killer, second-paragraph, anecdotal follow:

In the ’70s, when Robinson proved she could tour with the hard-partying Led Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones and file juicy behind-the-scenes stories without pissing anybody off — or, as she contends, having to sleep with anybody — the New York native established herself as music journalism’s ultimate insider. Robinson was the cool girl who introduced David Bowie to Lou Reed and shielded Patti Smith on the side of a Central Park stage so she could pee. She helped The Clash and Elvis Costello get their first record deals (“Never got a thank-you,” she notes tartly) and even lent Jagger a pair of her best lace underwear for a show in Toronto because his pants were too sheer.

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Lady Gaga Graces Cover of Latest Vanity Fair

Anyone sick of Lady Gaga yet? Yes? Well, too bad. She’s not going anywhere. Her latest stop is on the cover of the January Vanity Fair, and inside the magazine she talks about a variety of things.

Gaga tells Contributing Editor Lisa Robinson that her fame has cost her an identity, explaining, “When I’m onstage, I’m so giving and so open and myself. And when the spotlight goes off, I don’t know quite what to do with myself.”

She also says that her passion for gay rights is inexhaustible and that her romantic relationships tend to end terribly.

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September Vanity Fair Features Jennifer Lopez

The September issue of Vanity Fair features Jennifer Lopez (or is it J. Lo still? Or maybe Jenny from the block? We can’t keep up) on the cover and her fist interview since divorcing Marc Anthony. Lopez talks to Contributing Editor Lisa Robinson about those infamous “diva rumors” that have plagued her career and what prompted the end of her marriage:

To understand that a person is not good for you, or that that person is not treating you in the right way, or that he is not doing the right thing for himself—if I stay, then I am not doing the right thing for me. I love myself enough to walk away from that now.

Judging by the comments on Vanity Fair’s site – one person says “SHE HAS GIVEN ALL WOMEN THIS – ‘BE TRUE TO THYSELF’. MY RESPECTS TO HER FOR THIS MUST HAVE BEEN A VERY DIFFICULT DECISION” – readers are going to love this issue. Let’s just hope they don’t yell at everyone about it.

The magazine hits newsstands in L.A. and here tomorrow, and nationally on August 9.

Katy Perry in Vanity Fair: ‘I didn’t have a childhood’

The celebrity story for the new Vanity Fair – which hits newsstands this Thursday – is dedicated to Katy Perry, the eclectic pop musician. In the piece by Lisa Robinson, Perry delves into a variety of subjects, including life with husband Russell Brand (the press offered her “millions” for pictures of her wedding) and her odd upbringing.

When discussing the latter, Perry simply states, “I didn’t have a childhood.” Then, to prove that, she explains that she wasn’t allowed to say “Dirt Devil,” or “Deviled Eggs,” and the only book her mother ever read to her was the Bible. And just to cement the fact that Perry had an atypical young life, there’s a quote from her mother:

Perry’s mother confirms that she is proud of her daughter’s success, telling Robinson, ‘The Lord told us when I was pregnant with her that she would do this.’

Somehow we think the lord left out the whole I Kissed a Girl part when predicting Perry’s future successes.

Vanity Fair’s Two September Covers

vf.pngTo commemorate the passing of two American icons on the same day last month, Vanity Fair is producing two covers for its September issue.

The Michael Jackson cover, with the title “Fallen King,” features a 1989 Annie Leibowitz photo, while Farrah Fawcett‘s “Fallen Angel” cover shows the model and actress in her prime — in a 1976 photo by Bruce McBroom.

The related tribute articles were written by Lisa Robinson, who interviewed Jackson many times throughout his life, while Leslie Bennetts writes about Fawcett — a story she was working on long before the star’s death, WWD reports.

AMC show “Mad Men” was originally scheduled to be on the September cover, but they are now relegated to a story inside with a photo spread by Leibowitz, WWD said.

via Memopad

Related:
Magazines Remembering Michael Hit Newsstands

More Michael Jackson Tributes: Four Special EW Covers, A Hardcover Book And More

Vanity Fair Scours the Globe, Beats the Bushes for Celebrites for Photo Sessions

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In the November Vanity Fair, there’s an Annie Leibovitz 2007 Music Portfolio of folk singers. (Exclusive shaky-cam video here.) Evidently the wily buggers are very elusive, as contributing editor Lisa Robinson writes:

Once again, research consultant Deane Zimmerman made hundreds of phone calls and sent countless e-mails to track people down.

Last year, the Music Portfolio captured a number of county artists, and they too were a canny bunch:

research consultant Deane Zimmerman had to live through about 2,000 phone calls and an equal
number of e-mails to track everyone down.

In 2005, rappers were the focus, and yes, they were surprisingly skittish:

research consultant Deane Zimmerman tracked people down through relatives, lawyers, and friends

Is it really that hard to get well-known performers to agree to get their pictures taken by a well-known photographer for a well-known magazine?

Or is there some nepotism at work here?

(photograph by Kathryn MacLeod)