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Posts Tagged ‘Luke Y. Thompson’

Meet the Critic Who Liked After Earth AND Battlefield Earth

Topless Robot editor Luke Y. Thompson knew what he was getting himself into when he gave After Earth a positive review. On his personal Facebook page Thursday, he linked to the article with the declaration “I liked it. I’ll defend it.” This prompted fellow LAFCA member Wade Major to comment: “Oh dude… That’s seriously putting yourself out there… Armor up.”

Actually, what really puts Thompson out there is that on Rotten Tomatoes, he is the only critic tagging both After Earth and John Travolta’s 2000 Scientology sci-fi epic Battlefield Earth as “Fresh:”

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Personal Essay Writing: Master Class

Personal Essay Writing: Master ClassStarting October 21, work with the senior editor at Marie Claire magazine to polish and publish your essay! Whitney Joiner will help you to develop your voice, narrative, and identity, draft your pitch, and decide where to market your essay. Register now!

James Deen Tells Reporter the New York Times Was ‘Accurate Enough’

There’s a quote to be savored at the half-way mark of Topless Robot editor Luke Y. Thompson‘s article “On the Set of a Sci-Fi Porno.” It was given to LYT by hot young adult (and budding crossover) star James Deen in the midst of the making of Surviving Humanity, a film intended to first be released as an R-rated offering.

Thompson tried (and failed) to get Deen to dish on the actor’s recent The Canyons co-star Lindsay Lohan. But when he brought up that infamous New York Times Magazine piece by Stephan Rodrick, about the movie’s tumultuous production, he fielded this answer:

Deen says only that it’s “accurate enough – it is real-life events reflected in a mirror and retold for dramatic effect. There’s enough in it that’s true that we can’t say it’s not true, but there’s also so much else there than what they described just in that article.”

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Topless Robot Readers Welcome New Editor Luke Y. Thompson

Longtime LA film critic, part-time actor and recent nerdist.com content gatekeeper Luke Y. Thompson doesn’t start his new job as editor of Village Voice Media’s geek blog Topless Robot until next week. But already, the commenters to his welcome message post are keeping him busy.

As we were looking at that post, a real-time widget kept alerting us about two, five, three new comments… Seriously, with a readership as hungry and responsive as this, LYT seems to be in for a fun, fast and furious next career phase. Assuming he can keep up.

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James Rainey vs Jill Stewart

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James Rainey‘s column today in the LAT ends like this:

I don’t see the Weekly regaining its equilibrium as long as Stewart remains in charge of the news section. It’s likely that a new top editor will be brought in from outside.

But no one I talked to expects the bombastic Ms. Stewart to be going anywhere any time soon.

So Jill Stewart sent us this letter which we have printed in full:

Hi there,

I wanted to tell my colleagues and friends in journalism and blogging that James Rainey of the Los Angeles Times did not contact me for his take-down attempt column about me today, published during the very same week in which news-side stories I assigned and edited blew the Times out of the water at the Los Angeles Press Club awards. These awards, announced five days ago, were judged entirely by journalists in other major cities around the nation to avoid local favoritism. And then yesterday, a young reporter who won a major award for a piece that I assigned and edited beat The New York Times and was in Washington, D.C. collecting his award.

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LA CityBeat Mourned In The Blogosphere

cbcover.jpgWe’ve gathered some of the online mumblings from former employees of the now-defunct paper. On his blog LA Photo, photojournalist Ted Soqui posted some of the lovely covers he’d done over the years, and wrote:

Worked with several amazing editors, writers, and designers there, and made some life long friends. LA City Beat will not fade in my memory.

Journalist Dennis Romero wrote on DanceBlogga.com:

Although I had problems with the way the place was run in the last year, it’s disappointing to see that L.A. can’t support two weekly newspapers. More than anything, the paper’s demise is a product of the soft economy and an advertising and media world that’s migrating online.

On lytrules.com, Luke Y. Thompson vented his frustration at seeing a paper with so much talent go under:

Was it the economy, or was it the incredibly stupid move by management to fire Steve Appleford as editor/head/writer/photographer? (Firing a guy who does almost everything, and replacing him with, for example, someone who had never been an editor before…surely not the best business plan). After Steve left, the paper never recovered. An expensive “relaunch” gave the paper cosmetic changes that were all reversed a few months later, and Rebecca Schoenkopf, whose strength as a writer is first-person pieces, became editor and wrote a cover story that was just a bullet-point piece of bits of advice her mom gave her. I grant you, I would rather read that than the OC Weekly’s umpteenth report on the Capistrano School District, but it’s still not cover-story material.

Donnell Alexander noted the demise of CityBeat on his website, and posted a story he was assigned to write for a future issue of the paper. It’s a piece for which he’s yet to be paid. His closing words:

I’ll miss CityBeat even though Southland Publishing – for whom I worked as New Angeles EIC, too – is the cheapest fucking publisher ever to employ this nigga. Runaway titlist. No company has come close.