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Posts Tagged ‘Malcolm Gladwell’

Harvey Weinstein, David Zinczenko and Peggy Siegal Throws Another Party

1003_mockup.gif‘Tis the season for power lunches disguised as holiday celebrations, and this afternoon at Michael’s it was SRO as the moguls (Harvey Weinstein, Tommy Mottola), a perennial party giver (Peggy Siegal and her indefatigable minions) and boldface names (Star Jones, Muffie Potter Aston) poured into the dining room for one head-spinning scene. While Bonnie Fuller and company shoe-horned 14 people comfortably into Table One, Peggy presided over a lunch for 34 in the Garden Room honoring “The Untouchables.” (Although I didn’t see them, I did spot — I think — Malcolm Gladwell and Stu Zakim in the crowd). The rest of the dining room was full of table hoppers and gladhanders — Harvey Weinstein works a room like nobody’s business — and I noticed there was plenty of glasses of red and white wine all around. Cheers!

I was joined today by Anne Fulenwider who has plenty to celebrate these days having  “come home” to Marie Claire in September. She was tapped for the top job after Joanna Coles departed for Cosmo when Kate White left to write her best sellers full-time. I know, you need a score card for all this, but do try to keep up. Anne’s extraordinary rise to the top of the masthead is a master class on how to succeed in publishing by being very smart, working hard and staying grounded amid all the glitz and glamour (yes, to civilians and the uninitiated this is a glamorous business). The Harvard graduate came to New York in the mid-nineties and landed her first job in magazines working for David Lauren at Swing. An internship at The Paris Review turned into a gig as research assistant to George Plimpton when he was working on his book on Truman Capote. Anne got quite an education diving into boxes of fascinating transcripts, fact checking scores of Plimpton’s interviews and, occasionally ”chopping carrots” at his home and pitching in whenever needed. All in a day’s work.

Diane Clehane and Anne Fulenwider

When the book was done, she went on to become senior editor, moved to Vanity Fair where she was editor of the magazine’s popular “Fanfare” section, and wound up editing the work of Leslie Bennetts, Buzz Bissinger and Dominick Dunne. Except for a brief sojourn to San Francisco, she spent a decade at the magazine where, she said, she “grew up” and was “inspired” by Vanity Fair’s great reporting and writing and learned that “maintaining quality” and upholding the highest journalistic standards (“There were armies of fact checkers and researchers!”) were critical to the vitality and relevance of a successful magazine.

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

The New Yorker Acquires The Borowitz Report

The New Yorker has acquired the satirical news site The Borowitz Report. The site, which is written by Andy Borowitz, is now housed at Newyorker.com. In announcing the move to the New Yorker, Borowitz says everything will stay the same, and that all topics are fair game, aside from one.

David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, has assured me that I can write whatever I want as long as I don’t make fun of Malcolm Gladwell,” explains Borowitz.

Borowitz’s first column is up this morning. It’s about Mitt Romney releasing the first picture of his running mate. The choice? Rich Uncle Pennybags, from the game Monopoly.

The eXiled Launches Media Transparency Project

Political journos beware. The eXiled just announced it’s launching a media transparency project “to expose corrupt shills and corporate trolls among political journalists and bloggers in the US.”

For those unfamiliar with The eXiled, allow us to give you a brief primer–takedowns of journalists they consider hacks or co-opted in any way are the site’s specialty. Whether throwing a pie filled with horse sperm in the face of New York Times Moscow Bureau Chief Michael Wines for his shameless Putin apologism, or their recent investigation into Malcolm Gladwell‘s shilling for big tobacco, the site is as vicious and unforgiving as they come.

Writes Team eXiled:

Our computers are bulging with files on corrupt publications, bloggers and journalists, and it’s time to get it all out in the open. We’re going to launch a separate website, and a slick corporate troll tracking platform to do it. The blogosphere has a very short memory, allowing blog pundits to hide from their past shilling campaigns. But not anymore…

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The New Yorker Chooses 9/11 for First e-Book

We’re not quite sure how much of an audience there is for e-books, but The New Yorker is certainly grabbing some attention with its first venture into the territory. The Cutline reports that the magazine’s first e-book — titled After 9/11 — will center on 9/11, and features writing that will make it attractive to readers:

[The book] includes vignettes from the magazine’s trademark ‘Talk of the Town’ section by Hendrik Hertzberg, John Updike, Jonathan Franzen, Susan Sontag, Calvin Trillin and George Packer; deeply reported features by Adam Gopnik, Seymour Hersh, Jane Mayer, Jon Lee Anderson and Steve Coll; criticism by Malcolm Gladwell; and fiction by Don DeLillo. It also includes Nicholas Schmidles recent account of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

The New Yorker’s Deputy Editor, Pam McCarthy, said that if the book is successful, the magazine will look to do more.

After 9/11 is available for $7.99 on the Kindle or Nook.

Bill Simmons’ Grantland Launches, Replete With Obnoxious Subway Ads

Unlike many around the Interwebz, we’re not Bill Simmons haters. We read every column, think he’s entertaining and we too enjoy the Real World/Road Rules Challenge from time to time. So we were excited for today’s launch of Grantland, Simmons’ new sports/pop culture site which has attracted the writing talents of some serious heavy hitters, including Malcolm Gladwell, Chuck Klosterman and Dave Eggers. And we still are excited. Today’s debut has original pieces by Simmons, Klosterman and New York Times writer Jonathan Abrams among others.

But, forgetting content for a moment, at first glance there’s something that needs addressing: the ridiculously tacky ads. Simmons and his podcast have a longstanding relationship with Subway. Still, we were a little surprised to see a small banner at the top corner noting that the site is “presented by Subway” (it also seems to alternatively be “presented by Klondike”). For a site that aspires to the greatness of Spy, that’s pretty shameless. The LA Times took flack for putting ads on its front page. What if the whole operation was sponsored by AEG? Wouldn’t look so good, right?

We get that in order to bring writers like Gladwell aboard you have to pay the bills. But come on. This was supposed to be Simmons’ edgy realm, unbound by the constraints of his more commercial ESPN ventures.

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Bill Simmons’ New Site Grantland Coming Into Shape

More details are coming out about ESPN blogger Bill Simmons‘ new sports/pop culture online startup. Yesterday, ESPN announced the site will be called Grantland.com, named after the famous sportswriter Grantland Rice. Grantland will make its debut in June and has already signed up a roster of heavy hitters. Chuck Klosterman has been on board from the start, but now it appears both David Eggers and Malcolm Gladwell have signed up to be contributing editors. Former Vulture.com editor Lane Brown is also on staff as the site’s new deputy editor while former GQ editor Dan Fierman will be leader editor under Simmons.

Not a bad lineup. Especially all the print heavyweights who are apparently willing to have their work appear online only.

Details Emerge on Bill Simmons’ Website

Love him or hate him, Bill Simmons is a name writers know. And now that he is launching his own website – called Grantland – he’s going to be even more prevalent than ever before. Before going further, if you’re a hater, we suggest you stop reading now. The all-star lineup of writers he has assembled is only going to make you hate him even more.

According to ESPN, Grantland – named after Grantland Rice, a legend in the sports journalism world – will not only house all of Simmons’ columns and podcasts, but also a slew of columns, blogs and long-form features from contributors.

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Malcolm Gladwell’s Reading Habits

The Atlantic Wire sometimes interviews people and gets them to discuss their “media diet.” Today’s edition is with Malcolm Gladwell, the intellectual, writer, and social media enthusiast. Unfortunately, it seems that Gladwell doesn’t really read much, and when he does, he’s about a day behind:

I try to keep that time free for writing and thinking and don’t read any media at all until lunchtime, when I treat myself to The New York Times–the paper edition. At this point, I realize, I am almost a full 24 hours behind the news cycle. Is this is a problem?

Gladwell’s next book: Slow: How Being The Last to Know Things Helps Sell Books with Long Titles.

Malcolm Gladwell Continues to Downplay Social Media

Despite growing evidence to the contrary, Malcolm Gladwell once again downplayed social media’s role in promoting activism, this time in an interview on CNN. He says that while Twitter and Facebook might have been used in Tunisia and Egypt, they didn’t have much impact because there have been revolutions before, without them:

I can’t look in the past at social revolutions and see examples of cases where people had a problem under – under dire circumstances of getting lots of people together to voice their concerns, right? I mean, in East Germany, a million people gathered in the streets of Berlin. They were – the percentage of people in East Berlin in East Germany who even had a telephone in 1989 was 13 percent, right?

This argument is a little odd. By Gladwell’s logic, tanks, radar, jet fighters, etc. have no significant impact on wars because there were wars before them. It’s ridiculous.

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Malcolm Gladwell’s Advice For Young Journalists: Skip J-School

gladwell.jpgTime.com has a new Q&A with author and New Yorker essayist Malcolm Gladwell, as he promotes his latest book, a collection of New Yorker pieces entitled What the Dog Saw.

The last question, in which Gladwell offers advice to young journalists, caught our eye:

“Aspiring journalists should stop going to journalism programs and go to some other kind of grad school. If I was studying today, I would go get a master’s in statistics, and maybe do a bunch of accounting courses and then write from that perspective. I think that’s the way to survive. The role of the generalist is diminishing. Journalism has to get smarter.”

Although journalism programs at graduate schools saw an increase in enrollment this year, we’re sure there are a few people who would agree with Gladwell, maybe even including some recently laid off reporters with J-school degrees.

What do you think?

Author Malcolm Gladwell — Time.com

(Photo via Flickr)

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