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Posts Tagged ‘Marcus Brauchli’

Marcus Brauchli to Step Down from Washington Post

Marcus Brauchli, the executive editor of The Washington Post, is stepping down. Brauchli is leaving his post on December 31 to become vice president of The Washington Post Company, a new role.

“After nearly four and a half years as executive editor, I will step down at year’s end,” said Brauchli, in a memo to staffers, via Jim Romenesko. “It has been a privilege and honor to work with you. What we’ve accomplished in this time, and what you accomplish every day, is a tribute to your ambition, discipline and personal dedication.”

For more on Marty Baron, Brauchli’s successor, head over to our sister site FishbowlDC.

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Liz Spayd Leaving The Washington Post

Liz Spayd, the Washington Post’s first female managing editor, is leaving at the end of the year. Politico reports that Spayd accepted a buyout and is expected to leave after the presidential election. Spayd has been with WaPo since 1988, serving in a variety of positions. She has been managing editor since 2009.

According to a memo obtained by Poynter, WaPo’s executive editor, Marcus Brauchli, said there has been no exact date set for Spayd’s departure.

“She [Spayd] is a bulwark of sound judgment upon whom we all have come to depend, whose views are reasoned and thoughtful,” wrote Brauchli. “She is steeped in this great institution’s traditions and has ensured we honor them in our journalism, in whatever form, on whatever platform, at whatever speed we produce it. She epitomizes the best of The Post.”

WaPo Names John Temple New Managing Editor

The Washington Post has named John Temple its new Managing Editor. Temple was most recently the founding editor of Honolulu Civil Beat, an online news site. Prior to that he was the Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of the Rocky Mountain News, which folded in 2009. Marcus Brauchli, the Executive Editor of WaPo, said Temple was the perfect candidate for the job.

“As a managing editor for The Post, John will ensure that the coverage we provide to our print and digital audiences is smart, original and acutely attentive to our audience,” said Brauchli. “He’ll help us to build on the rapid growth we’ve enjoyed recently with readers who come to us through our website, on mobile devices, or through new platforms like the incredibly successful Washington Post Social Reader on Facebook.”

Temple’s first day is April 30.

WaPo Offers Buyouts to Some Staffers

Newspapers offering buyouts is beginning to become quite common. The latest to offer staffers a paid way out the door is The Washington Post, which has offered buyouts in the past. Per a memo from Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli, only a limited amount of people will be able to accept the offer, since WaPo can “absorb staffing changes better in some areas than in others.”

The announcement unfortunately comes the same day as this Forbes story, which details how WaPo missed out on becoming one of the earliest investors in Facebook. That’s some bad timing.

More from the memo, which was obtained by Jim Romenesko:

In those departments where we do offer the buyout, there will be caps on the number of people who can participate, in order to moderate the impact and preserve our competitiveness in core coverage areas. In addition, we may turn down some volunteers if we feel their departure would impair our journalism. That said, it is important that we achieve real savings.

Any measure like this is difficult. But we believe this approach is a sensible and effective way of addressing the economic forces affecting our industry.

Pre-Murdoch Wall Street Journal Managing Editor Walked With $6.4 million

PH2008070702834.jpgDon’t cry too hard for Marcus Brauchli, the former Wall Street Journal editor who resigned from the paper four months after Rupert Murdoch acquired it from the Bancroft family.

Now executive editor at The Washington Post, it’s always been a closely-guarded secret how much Brauchli got to walk away from his position, but the new book on the Murdoch/Bancroft saga by Sarah Ellison has finally revealed the number to be $6.4 million.

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Times-Journal Feud Update: Brauchli Weighs In

nytwsj.jpgYesterday, as New York Times executive editor Bill Keller sent a comment to The New York Observer, continuing the spat between the Times and The Wall Street Journal, former Journal editor Marcus Brauchli was offering his take on the year-old dust up to Politico.

“I have to say I wondered, since when do newspaper editors take it upon themselves to correct what they in their righteousness perceive as factual errors in other peoples’ press releases? That must keep them very busy,” Brauchli told Michael Calderone about his thoughts last year upon hearing that Keller had written to the George Polk Awards committee to complain about a press release that mentioned the Journal.

Of course, Brauchli wasn’t too busy to write a letter of his own to the award committee, defending his paper’s work against Keller’s griping.

Read more: Brauchli responds to WSJ-NYT feud

Previously: Keller’s Letter To Award Committee Comes To Light, Journal Responds

Keller’s Letter To Award Committee Comes To Light, Journal Responds

nytwsj.jpgEarlier this week, New York Times‘ media columnist David Carr wrote a piece summarizing the last two years at The Wall Street Journal since it was sold by the Bancroft family to Rupert Murdoch‘s News Corp.

The article boiled down to the fact that the publication has become, in Carr’s opinion, much more right-wing and conservative, especially in its D.C. bureau, following the takeover. Immediately after the piece was published, we received a comment from Robert Thompson, managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, who accused Carr of bringing up old rivalries between the two publications. Although it has to be mentioned that in his statement it was Thompson who rehashed old fights, by mentioning how last year Times‘ executive editor Bill Keller wrote a memo to “a prize committee” urging them to look closer at some of the Journal‘s stories before handing out awards for excellence in journalism.

And in case you thought that would be the end of it, you were wrong: now that the two print titans have each other in the crosshairs, neither is backing down. Oooh, fight!

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Washington Post Goes Local, Closes NY Office

post.jpgLet the pre-Thanksgiving bad news dump continue.

Washington Post editor Marcus Brauchli sent a memo to staffers late yesterday announcing that the paper was shutting down national bureaus in New York, Los Angeles and Chicago at the end of the year. Three news aides lost their jobs because of the move, although the six reporters in the bureaus have been offered jobs in D.C., our sister blog FishbowlDC reported.

The move highlights the Post‘s desire to concentrate its “limited resources” on coverage of local news that it feels is important to its readers. Explained Brauchli in his memo:

“At a time of limited resources and increased competitive pressure, it’s necessary to concentrate our journalistic firepower on our central mission of covering Washington and the news, trends and ideas that shape both the region and the country’s politics, policies and government.”

In an interview with the Post‘s media columnist Howard Kurtz, Brauchli added, “We are not a national news organization of record serving a general audience. Nor are we a wire service or cable channel.”

Guess that leaves The New York Times as the sole “local” newspaper that still serves as a “national news organization of record,” are we right?

Washington Post shutters last U.S. bureausWashington Post

WaPo Closing LA, NYC And Chicago Bureaus –FishbowlDC

Brauchli Discusses Salon Flap|Shepard Fairey|Self Layoffs|Hearst Tells Amazon It Will Work To Shorten Delivery Times|Nikki Finke’s Powerful Women List

FishbowlDC: The Washington Post‘s Marcus Brauchli addressed the Salon controversy in an online chat today.

FishbowlLA: Shepard Fairey, the artist of the iconic Barack Obama posters, has admitted he lied about which Associated Press photo he used for his work.

Gawker: Self laid off a couple staffers last week, including Stephanie Newhouse, a member of the family that built Conde Nast.

Audience Development: Amazon.com has asked magazine publishers to work towards shortening delivery times. Hearst is the first company to agree.

Elle: Blogger Nikki Finke has compiled a Most Powerful Women in Hollywood list for Elle.

“Mouthpiece Theater” Has Been Killed

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WaPo announced it’s canceling “Mouthpiece Theater.” Really? Did someone get the note the name sounds like a spoofy porn title? Or a nickname to the Tomkat Theater in WeHo? Get it – it’s sounds like a oral sex on a dude and how that can’t be AT ALL funny is the greatest mystery of this whole ordeal.

Howard Kurtz writes:

Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli killed the satirical video series Wednesday after harsh criticism of a joke about Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, which had prompted him to pull the latest episode from the paper’s Web site Friday night. The Post staffers who appeared in the videos, Dana Milbank and Chris Cillizza, agreed with the decision and apologized in separate interviews.

Plus we like to think the the death (ahem) blow was made by Andy Cobb‘s brilliant parody we posted yesterday. The other version is the web series imploded under the weight of its own lameness. Either way.

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