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Posts Tagged ‘Marcus Brauchli’

The NYO Dives Into the Deep-End of ‘How to Save Newspapers’

kindle-1.jpgThe New York Observer has a nice long, very smart, multi-bylined piece today about the future of newspapers. It’s worth reading the whole thing, but for those of you in a rush the short version is that newspapers should look more like Facebook! Kidding…but only sort of. Says the NYO:

The media of the 21st century is one that is blogged — not a negative thing, see later in the piece! — and merged with the users’ own experiences and viewpoints synthesized with the original. If postmodernism came to literature in the ’80s, it’s got to come to journalism now.

In the meantime here’s a quick takeaway from some of the major players the NYO spoke with:

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Brauchli to WaPo: Post-Game Chatter

080708_PB_Brauchli.jpgAccording to Ben Bradlee the reason that WaPo hired outsider Marcus Brauchli to replace departing executive editor Len Downie was that there was no “home-grown” person ready to do the job. Says Bradlee: “They didn’t think they had a guy ready. If they got the right guy, that is good. It is as simple as that.” Downie, however, says that it was merely a matter of Weymouth finding the right person for the job and that Brauchli’s lack of Post experience is not an issue. Post reporters also appear to be optimistic about their new boss, longtime Postie Dana Priest says not only are people relieved that the position has been filled but are more than willing to give Brauchli the benefit of the doubt. Meanwhile,
James Grimaldi says that he wishes him “all the luck in the world” because basically the future of humanity rests on Brauchli’s success (actually just “the future of The Washington Post and…what Post journalism means” but still, no pressure!).

Over at Slate Jack Shafer seems to think none of this matters much at all since as far as newspapers are concerned the power resides with the publisher.

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Dow Jones Committee Condemns News Corp. Handling of Brauchli Resignation

Add another chapter (and headache for Rupert Murdoch) to the imbroglio surrounding former Wall Street Journal managing editor Marcus Brauchli‘s departure: A report published this afternoon on WSJ‘s own site — essentially pitting News Corp. against Dow Jones in a moral mano y mano —asserts that the “special committee established to oversee The Wall Street Journal‘s editorial integrity said its members should have been informed earlier that the newspaper’s managing editor, Marcus Brauchli, had been pressured to resign.” But the damning article alone wasn’t all…

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Wall Street Journal ME Resigns, Murdoch To Buy Newsday

murdoch-fists75x75.jpgPer Fishbowl NY: Rupert Murdoch’s reign at The Wall Street Journal took a hit today when reports that managing editor Marcus Brauchli announced his resignation surfaced. According to sources within the paper, “Brauchli tried to find a middle path between the paper’s traditionalists and Murdoch’s new vision for the paper,” but was unable to, which isn’t a surprise in the least.

The guys at Newsday must be thrilled.

Rupe Street Journal: The Internal Memos


—–Original Message—–
From: Brauchli, Marcus
Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2007 6:45 AM
Subject: On the News

Colleagues,

Today’s news that a decisive proportion of Bancroft family trusts will vote in favor of News Corp.’s proposed acquisition of Dow Jones begins a process that will affect us all, but won’t change what we do in the newsroom.

As journalists at Dow Jones and The Wall Street Journal, we have always focused on maintaining the high quality and integrity of our work, without regard to our ownership. We will continue to do so.

Our journalism defines the Journal. A change in ownership won’t change our understanding of what’s important; our ability to compellingly explain the world, politics and business; or our commitment to reporting that is accurate, honest and free of slant.

We know that a successful news organization’s first obligation is to its readers. We must serve them, recognizing that their interests and needs change constantly, and that we will have to change with them.

It is too early to know how or even whether News Corp. ownership might alter priorities or structures at Dow Jones. Our current and likely future owners have given formal assurances, however, that the newsroom will retain its independence.

An owner who values editorial independence is essential to the Journal’s success. Yet it is we who ultimately will ensure it, through the continued quality and integrity of our work.

Clarence Barron‘s heirs in the Bancroft family have been loyal and proud stewards of The Wall Street Journal for nearly 80 years. The Journal today, in print, online and in new media, in the U.S. and internationally, sets the highest journalistic standard thanks to their long support. I hope you share in my deep gratitude to them.

Regards,

Brauchli, New York

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