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Posts Tagged ‘Margaret Sullivan’

NY Times Public Editor to Deliver CUNY J-School Commencement

MargaretSullivanHeadshotThis will be a great speech. Margaret Sullivan, The New York Times’ public editor, will serve as the commencement speaker at CUNY’s graduate school of journalism on December 19.

Sullivan has only been with the Times since 2012, but in that short amount of time she has established herself as one of the paper’s best public editors.

“We’re delighted to have such a thought-provoking journalist, one who is constantly wrestling with the thorniest issues of journalistic ethics and integrity, addressing our graduates as they enter the field of professional reporting,” said CUNY Dean Sarah Bartlett, in a statement.

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Twitter Rages Against New York Times Michael Brown Characterization

Some have chosen to react to the New York Times description of Michael Brown as “no angel” with sarcastic tweets about their youthful misdemeanors. Others are full of rage:

NoAngelTweet#1

Many of those expressing anger and outrage have likely not read the full article, and therefore perhaps do not realize that “no angel” in the fifth paragraph is a callback to reporter John Eligon‘s lede:

FERGUSON, Mo. — It was 1 a.m. and Michael Brown Jr. called his father, his voice trembling. He had seen something overpowering. In the thick gray clouds that lingered from a passing storm this past June, he made out an angel. And he saw Satan chasing the angel and the angel running into the face of God.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Chopper Crash Injures NYT Reporter | Tribune Media Profits Up

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NYT Correspondent Injured in Iraq Helicopter Crash (TVNewser)
New York Times reporter Alissa Rubin was injured when the relief helicopter she was traveling in crashed Tuesday, killing the pilot. The helicopter was on a mission to aid Yazidi refugees in Iraq. FishbowlNY According to crash survivors, the helicopter went down shortly after takeoff. The cause of the incident has yet to be confirmed. NYT Rubin, 56, the Times’ Paris bureau chief and a longtime war correspondent, apparently suffered a concussion, at least one broken wrist and possibly some broken ribs but was conscious. Adam Ferguson, 35, a freelance photographer working for the Times who was accompanying Rubin, said via cellphone text that he suffered a sore jaw and some minor bumps. HuffPost Rubin has a long history of war reporting. She was the bureau chief for the Times in both Baghdad and Kabul before transferring to Paris. Time Iraqi parliamentarian Vian Dakhil was among the survivors of the crash. Dakhil garnered international attention for her impassioned pleas on the floor of Iraq’s parliament to deliver aide to tens of thousands of Yazidis, a religious minority that fled into the mountains as ISIS fighters advanced northward into the Kurdish region of Iraq. A Kurdish official told the Times that the cause of the crash appeared to have been an accident and that no ISIS fighters were seen in the area at the time.

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New York Times Amends Carol Vogel Article

NYTEditorsNoteLogoThe first paragraph of Carol Vogel‘s July 25 New York Times article no longer reads like this. The text has been amended and the following Editors’ Note has been added at the bottom:

Editors’ Note: July 30, 2014
The Inside Art column on July 25, about a planned exhibition of the works of the Renaissance painter Piero di Cosimo, started with a description of the artist’s life and eccentricities. That passage improperly used specific language and details from a Wikipedia article without attribution; it should not have been published in that form. (Editors learned of the problem after publication from a post on FishbowlNY.)

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A NYT Lede That Duplicates Wikipedia

PierodiCosimoWikipediaExhibit A is the fourth paragraph from the biography section of Wikipedia’s entry for Italian Renaissance painter Piero di Cosimo (all underlining is ours):

During his lifetime, Cosimo acquired a reputation for eccentricity — a reputation enhanced and exaggerated by later commentators such as Giorgio Vasari, who included a biography of Piero di Cosimo in his Lives of the Artists. Reportedly, he was frightened of thunderstorms, and so pyrophobic that he rarely cooked his food; he lived largely on hard-boiled eggs, which he prepared 50 at a time while boiling glue for his artworks. He also resisted any cleaning of his studio, or trimming of the fruit trees of his orchard; he lived, wrote Vasari, “more like a beast than a man.

Exhibit B is the first paragraph of Carol Vogel‘s July 24 New York Times item “A Renaissance Master Finally Gets a Showcase:”

Artists can be eccentric, but the quirks of the Italian Renaissance master Piero di Cosimo are legendary. He is said to have been terrified of thunderstorms and so pyrophobic that he rarely cooked his food, subsisting mostly on hard-boiled eggs that he prepared 50 at a time while heating glue for his art. He didn’t clean his studio. He didn’t trim the trees in his orchard. Giorgio Vasari, the Renaissance biographer, described Piero as living “more like a beast than a man.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Comcast, TWC Face Senate | Pauley to CBS | CNN’s Digital Video Push

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Senate Panel Expresses Caution on Merger of Cable Giants (NYT)
Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee expressed concern on Wednesday that the proposed $45 billion merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable would raise the prices consumers pay for cable television and high-speed Internet service while leaving them with fewer choices for video programming. But the senators generally failed to rattle Comcast and Time Warner executives or cause them to diverge from their basic defense of the merger: that it will not affect competition because the two companies do not compete anywhere. Only one senator, Al Franken, Democrat of Minnesota, said during the three-hour hearing that he wanted the merger blocked. CNNMoney Comcast and Time Warner Cable said that the merger will lead to improvements in services for customers, creating scale and cost savings that will drive new investments. Several Republican senators, most notably Orin Hatch of Utah, seemed to agree. Although the combined company would have a presence in 19 of the top 20 U.S. markets, Comcast executive vice president David Cohen noted that Comcast and Time Warner Cable don’t compete in any of those cities. He argued that customer choices therefore won’t be affected. The Washington Post / The Switch “There’s no doubt that Comcast is a huge, influential company with more than 100 lobbyists” hired to persuade regulators and lawmakers to approve the deal, said Franken. “But I’ve also heard from over 100,000 consumers who oppose the deal.” Cohen said at the hearing that he couldn’t promise to reduce prices on their services. The rise of cable bills at three times the rate of inflation is among the many concerns consumers have about the proposal that would merge the top two cable firms and the biggest and third-biggest broadband providers. Adweek It’s not that the Senators didn’t have “concerns.” The stats that will define the combined company’s unmatched size — 19 of the top 20 markets, 23 of the top 25, and 37 of the top 50 — give lawmakers pause. They even struggled to understand whether or not the combined company would dominate advertising sales. But they stopped short of opposing the merger, calling on the Federal Communications Commission and Department of Justice “to consider carefully the impact on consumers as they review the pending merger,” said judiciary chairman Patrick Leahy. WSJ / MoneyBeat The hearing came a day after Comcast submitted a 180-page document justifying its purchase of Time Warner Cable. The filing walked through the various parts of the media industry that could be affected by the deal, including online video, television programming and broadband Internet access, as well as local ad sales in the cable market. If the deal wins approval, Comcast would have 30 percent of the nation’s pay-TV subscribers and nearly 40 percent of U.S. broadband subscribers.

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NY Times Public Editor Starts Tracking Anonymous Quotes

MargaretSullivanHeadshotMargaret Sullivan, The New York Times’ public editor, has had it with the Times’ use of unnecessary anonymous quotes. To point out the practice, Sullivan has launched something she’s calling “AnonyWatch.” Sullivan described it as “an effort to point out some of the more regrettable examples of anonymous quotations in the Times.”

The first incident featured on AnonyWatch includes an article that allowed a “Democratic insider” to claim that “Andrew Cuomo doesn’t really have friends.” As Sullivan noted, this goes against the Times’ policy of not allowing anonymous sources to slander people.

Another article Sullivan called out was even worse. In a piece on the Malaysian Airlines plane, an anonymous quote was issued on an anonymously sourced theory that someone on the plane made abrupt shifts in altitude to “depressurize the cabin and render the passengers and crew unconscious.”

When Sullivan asked the Times’ managing editor Dean Baquet for comment on the articles, he said they were both mistakes. We look forward to AnonyWatch locating more of those errors.

China Bloomberg Reporter Crosses Over to New York Times

MichaelForsytheBookCoverThis is pretty interesting. Michael Forsythe, a Hong-Kong based reporter who exited Bloomberg News in November after a controversial suspension and some article spiking, has moved over to the other major U.S. publication making recent headlines with matters pertaining to foreign-journalist visas in China.

From Christine Haughney‘s brief item:

After Bloomberg News published an article in June 2012 on the family wealth of Xi Jinping, at that time the incoming Communist Party chief, sales of Bloomberg terminals in China slowed, as officials ordered state enterprises not to subscribe. Officials also blocked Bloomberg’s website on Chinese servers, and the company has been unable to get residency visas for new journalists.

Mr. Forsythe was a lead reporter on the article about the Xi family and other articles in the 2012 “Revolution to Riches” series, which received a George Polk Award and awards from the Asia Society, the Overseas Press Club and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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NYT Public Editor Makes News in Buffalo

MargaretSullivanHeadshotThere’s some nice history coursing through this report about a talk Margaret Sullivan gave last night in Buffalo. The locale of the event, the Larkin Filling Station, was built in 1930 as part of the first-ever chain of service gas stations. And the article about what transpired appears in The Spectrum, a University of Buffalo student paper launched in 1950.

Managing editor Sara Dinatale notes that this was Sullivan’s first public return to the “Queen City” since leaving the post of executive editor of the Buffalo News for the New York Times. She retraces, briefly, a remarkable local ascension and then gets to various bits of nitty gritty:

Sullivan recalled something one of the The Times’ managing editors told her about “imposter syndrome.” It’s the idea that no one at the Times feels like they deserve to work there, so they all work hard to prove they’re worthy of their positions. It creates a competitive environment…

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Veteran Journalist Objects to NYT Nairobi Photos

MichaelDiebertTwitterProfilePicMichael Deibert (pictured) is currently based in Miami. But for much of the time in recent years, he has covered conflict in Congo and the troubles in Haiti.

In response to the New York Timespublication over the weekend of a series of photos taken of the Nairobi, Kenya shopping mall massacre by Pulitzer Prize winning photographer Tyler Hicks and Hicks’ wife, who found themselves by chance in the vicinity when the violence erupted, Deibert took to his personal blog. In an open letter to the paper’s public editor Margaret Sullivan, Deibert objects to the fact that the paper displayed in several of the pictures the faces of victims:

Quite honestly, as a journalist who has reported on conflict for going on quite a number of years, I was shocked and dismayed by this. Would the New York Times run photos of blood-soaked dead white Americans after one of the many mass shootings that occur in the United States? I doubt it. That they did so after the mass killings in Nairobi yesterday is very troubling, not just to me, but also to many other journalists, academics and analysts who focus on Africa.

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