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Posts Tagged ‘Margaret Sullivan’

New York Times Treats Its Jerusalem Bureau Chief Like a Child

The New York Times has taken the embarrassing step of providing Jodi Rudoren — the paper’s Jerusalem bureau chief — with a social media watchdog. According to the Times’ public editor, Margaret Sullivan, the move was necessary because Rudoren had used Twitter and Facebook to post some things that got people upset:

…During the Gaza conflict, she wrote one Facebook post in which she described Palestinians as ‘ho-hum’ about the death of loved ones, wrote of their ‘limited lives’ and, in another, said she shed her first tears in Gaza over a letter from an Israeli family. The comments came off as insensitive and the reaction was sharp, not only from media pundits, but also from dismayed readers.

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Twitter Suspends New York Times Parody Account [Update]

Apparently the execs at The New York Times do not have a sense of humor. The paper complained to Twitter about a parody account, called @NYTOnIt, which posted many ridiculous and obviously stupid trend stories published by the Times. The account is now suspended. A sample tweet from NYTOnIt was “Guys, boys want muscles and the Times is ON IT.”

According to Poynter, the paper said that the account’s use of the Times “T” is a violation of its trademark. Never mind that the NYTOnIt account, written by Benjamin Kabak, has an altered logo and even includes “This is a parody account clearly not associated with any newspaper” in its bio.

Eileen Murphy, spokesperson for the Times, admitted to Poynter that the paper had complained.

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Rupert Murdoch Makes a Good Point

Maybe Rupert Murdoch is jealous about all the press Margaret Sullivan gets, but you have to admit, he makes a good point.

New York Times Public Editor Gets it Wrong

Margaret Sullivan, the New York Times’ public editor, has been great since taking on the role, but when she attacked Nate Silver, she was wrong. Silver, the author of the political blog FiveThirtyEight, has become a target for Republicans lately because his prediction model has President Barack Obama easily beating Mitt Romney next Tuesday.

Joe Scarborough recently called Silver and his work out, and so Silver asked Scarboroguh to bet on the election results. “If you think it’s a toss-up, let’s bet,” tweeted Silver, to Scarborough. “If Obama wins, you donate $1,000 to the American Red Cross. If Romney wins, I do. Deal?”

Sullivan caught wind of the bet and called out Silver:

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Highlights from Jill Abramson’s Q & A

Jill Abramson, executive editor of The New York Times, took some time out of her day to answer readers’ questions. There were a variety of subjects covered, but we selected a few of our favorite questions and answers. Check them out below.

What’s your advice for a young female journalist who hopes to climb the ranks to a leadership role in the news media someday? 

Abramson: Learn how to report, listen to people and ferret out what is really interesting and important. Read Maureen Dowd.

How can you guarantee The New York Times’s objectivity in this age of “infotainment” and claims of bias?

Abramson: Our standards for accuracy and quality journalism include the separation of news and opinion, and articles are clearly labeled. A legendary executive editor named Abe Rosenthal once said he wanted his tombstone to read “he kept the paper straight.” This, too, is my standard for the news report.

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Margaret Sullivan on Being New York Times’ Public Editor: ‘I Always Find Something That Seems Compelling’

We’re fans of Margaret Sullivan, The New York Times’ public editor. Since taking over for Arthur Brisbane, she has been making her voice heard. That’s a good thing, even if people sometimes disagree with what she says.

In an interview with Poynter, Sullivan talks about what it’s like being the public editor and discloses that her desk is near the obituary department, which we found sort of oddly fitting. Below are some highlights from the piece.

On relating to Times staffers:

It’s a little bit like covering the police beat from a desk in the cop shop. You can be friendly, you can get to know people, but you probably can’t really be true friends. So far, I think everybody is striking a good balance.

On making her voice heard:

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New York Times Writer Incurs Wrath of Public Editor for Sexist Material

Andrew Goldman, the regular contributor for The New York Times Magazine’s “Talk” feature, is getting soundly criticized for what some claim to be a pattern of sexist and misogynistic questions during the interviews he conducts. The latest incident even prompted a response from Margaret Sullivan, the Times’ public editor.

In Goldman’s latest interview, he asks the actress Tippi Hedren if she ever thought about having sex with a director to advance her career. Jennifer Weiner, a published author, noticed Goldman’s question, and took to Twitter to criticize him for it — specifically because she thought he had been sexist in the past. Weiner’s tweet prompted Goldman to tweet back to her that she “would have liked at least to have had opportunity to sleep way to top.” Eventually Goldman apologized, and he has since deleted his Twitter account.

Sullivan noticed the incident, and asked Hugo Lindgren, the editor of the Times Magazine, about it.

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New York Times Makes Right Call With No Front Page Coverage of 9/11

Last year, on the 10th anniversary of 9/11, the New York Times had vast amounts of stories, a special web section and more, dedicated to the tragedy. This year? Not one single mention on the front page. And that’s the right call. As the paper’s public editor, Margaret Sullivanperfectly puts it, “The pain, the outrage, the loss — these never fade. The amount of journalism, however, must.”

There is no need for excessive amounts of 9/11 articles every single year. If there’s big news, sure. And always on significant anniversaries. But when it’s dragged out by media outlets over and over again, it begins to feel a bit exploitative.

The best strategy is to remember 9/11, but not dwell on it.

[Image via Newseum]

New York Times Public Editor is a Fan of Facts

Arthur Brisbane, the New York Times’ public editor who wackily questioned if the paper should publish facts, has moved on. Margaret Sullivan is now in his spot, and notably, her first blog post deals with the handling of truth. Sullivan is overwhelmingly in favor of telling the truth and making sure the paper gets things right, so we can all exhale.

The new public editor praises some pieces that have challenged the validity of reports, thanks Jay Rosen for making fact-checking a big issue, and then — well, then she takes a tiny jab at Brisbane:

Whatever the conclusions, whatever the effectiveness, of challenging facts, the idea that we have to debate the necessity of doing so strikes me as absurd.

Right on.

The New York Times Names Margaret Sullivan Public Editor

The New York Times has named Margaret Sullivan its new public editor. Sullivan is the first woman public editor at the paper. She comes to the Times from The Buffalo News, where she served as editor and vice president. She had been with the Buffalo News since 2000.

At the Times, Sullivan will have a more active digital role than her predecessors. Sullivan will be an “initiator, orchestrator and moderator of an ongoing conversation about the Times’ journalism,” according to a press release. She will also be posting thoughts on a blog.

“Margaret has exactly the right experience to assume this critical role for us at this time,” said Jill Abramson, executive editor of the Times. “She has an impressive 32-year background in print journalism where she has distinguished herself as a reporter, columnist, editor and manager. And critically for us at this time, she has shown adeptness at embracing new platforms and engaging and interacting with readers in real time online, in print and in person.”

Sullivan’s first day is September 1.

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