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Posts Tagged ‘Mark Thompson’

NY Times Joins Forces with Tina Brown

NYTimeslogoThe New York Times Company is partnering with Women of The World, the event company run by Tina Brown. As part of the multi-year deal, the Times will invest in Women in The World and launch a new digital platform for the company, which will be tied to NYTimes.com.

“In a few short years, Tina has made Women in the World one of the most influential and successful live event series focused on women and girls around the world,” said Mark Thompson, the Times’ CEO, in a statement. “Tina is renowned for her outstanding editorial vision, and we’re delighted with the prospect of collaborating with her and her team on this exciting and important project.”

Brown, Women in The World’s CEO and founder, will remain in that role. The event series is executive produced by Kyle Gibson.

The next Women in the World summit will be April 22–24 at the David H. Koch Theater in Lincoln Center. It will be produced in association with Times.

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NY Times to Boost Native Ads to Close Mobile Revenue Gap

The New York Times is turning to native advertising in an attempt to close its ever-widening mobile revenue gap. Plenty of readers access the Times on their phones or tablets, but the Times still doesn’t get much revenue from mobile ads. That’s a problem they’re hoping native ads will solve.

According to Ad Age, in the third quarter, just 10 percent of ad revenue for the Times was via mobile ads. Meanwhile, more than 50 percent of traffic was from mobile devices. Mark Thompson, the Times’ CEO, referred to this as a “significant delta” while speaking at the UBS Global Media and Communications Conference.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Winkler Out at Bloomberg | Ebola Fighters Are Time PoTY

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Matt Winkler Steps Down at Bloomberg News (FishbowlNY)
More changes at Bloomberg News, this time involving veteran editor-in-chief Matt Winkler, who is stepping down. Winkler has been editor of Bloomberg News for the past 24 years. Capital New York John Micklethwait, editor-in-chief of The Economist, will succeed Winkler, who co-founded the news service with Michael Bloomberg back in 1990. Micklethwait has edited The Economist since 2006. He will leave the company at the end of January. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The Economist is now searching for a replacement for Micklethwait, who joined the mag in 1987, a process that will very likely take several weeks. NYT On Tuesday, Bloomberg News named Winkler an editor-in-chief emeritus. One executive at Bloomberg, who was not authorized to speak publicly, said the change was a year in the making, but had accelerated since Bloomberg’s return to the company in September. Another Bloomberg executive said it was very much a joint decision based on the need for a cultural change in the news division, and that Bloomberg and Winkler remained close. HuffPost As editor-in-chief emeritus, Winkler will work with Bloomberg “on strategic initiatives, conducting high-profile interviews of global newsmakers and bringing his insights and expertise to the most important and market-moving stories.” Micklethwait will oversee editorial “across all Bloomberg platforms, including its news, newsletters, magazines, opinion, television, radio and digital properties,” according to a release. Bloomberg Media Group CEO Justin Smith, who is overseeing new consumer-facing sites for the company, like Bloomberg Politics, will continue reporting to Michael Bloomberg.

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Denise Warren Leaves NY Times After 26 Years

31warren-190Denise Warren, a veteran of The New York Times for more than two decades, is leaving the paper. According to a memo from Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger and CEO Mark Thompson, her decision to depart was a result of her role being split into two roles.

Warren had most recently served as executive vice president for digital products. The role was split into executive vice president for marketing and executive vice president for digital.

“Denise Warren has made the decision not to occupy either of these positions and will leave the Times after a 26-year career that saw her serve in a wide range of strategically important positions throughout the organization,” wrote Sulzberger and Thompson.

Warren joined the Times in 1988 as a financial analyst. She has served a variety of key roles for the paper, including chief advertising officer and general manager of NYTimes.com. She also oversaw the Times’ now-successful implementation of a paywall in 2011.

You can read Sulzberger and Thompson’s full note below.

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300 NY Times Staffers Consider Taking Buyouts

newyorktimes-logoNew York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger and CEO Mark Thompson are apparently going to have an easier time reducing the newsroom by 100 than they thought. According to The New York Post, 300 Times staffers have put in a request with the Newspaper Guild to review their severance packages.

Sulzberger and Thompson announced in early October that they needed to eliminate 100 jobs via either accepted buyouts or, if the number wasn’t reached, layoffs.

Though 300 people are reviewing their packages, it doesn’t mean they’re all in a rush to leave the Grey Lady. “A lot of people were just securing their rights and checking it out,” Grant Glickson, a union rep, told the Post.

Still, the fact that this many people are even giving the move a thought is interesting. It might be because the offer is heavily weighted toward urging veterans out the door. Staffers who have 20 or more years experience will get a bonus of 35 percent of their salary if they accept the Times offer. That could be just be enough to get people thinking of leaving the newspaper grind behind.

NY Times’ Sulzberger: Cuts are ‘Painful’

During a talk at NYU, Arthur Sulzberger Jr. — the New York Times’ publisher — told the audience that the layoffs and buyouts currently making their way through the paper are “painful.”

Early last month, the Times announced it would be reducing its newsroom by 100, via either buyouts or layoffs. In a note explaining the plan, Sulzberger and CEO Mark Thompson stated, “We know that they will be painful both for the individuals affected and for their colleagues.”

As Capital New York reports, Sulzberger went back to that “painful” description again during his NYU talk. ”We have more journalists today than we’ve ever had in our history,” said Sulzberger. “The skills necessary to succeed in this world are truly changing, and that’s not necessarily age-related. This is not to suggest going through these cycles is not painful. It is.”

We imagine 100 Times staffers agree.

NY Times to Cut 100 Newsroom Jobs, Shutter NYT Opinion

This is not going to be a good day for many New York Times staffers. The paper plans to cut a whopping 100 people from its newsroom. The last time the Times let go of this many people was in 2009.

The reduction in staff is — of course — a cost-cutting move. ”The job losses are necessary to control our costs and to allow us to continue to invest in the digital future of The New York Times, but we know that they will be painful both for the individuals affected and for their colleagues,” read a note from Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger and CEO Mark Thompson.

The Times plans to offer buyouts to staffers, but will resort to layoffs if enough people don’t accept the deals.

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NY Times Profits Plummet 21 Percent

As usual, the New York Times’ earnings report features both good and bad news (we suppose that pun is intended). While the Times’ digital subscriptions continued to grow, the lack of print ad dollars weighed the paper down. The end result was a 21 percent drop in profits during the second quarter.

The Times added 32,000 digital subscribers during the second quarter, bringing its total to 831,000 — a number that should make staffers proud. Still, total revenue dropped by 0.6 percent, mainly due to a four percent decline in ad revenue. Net income also declined from $20 million in 2013′s second quarter, to just $9 million this quarter.

“We saw continued growth in digital advertising and circulation revenues during the quarter,” Mark Thompson, CEO of the Times Company, said in a statement. “But know that we still have more work to do to transform our business and deliver long-term sustainable revenue growth for the company.”

Morning Media Newsfeed: USA-Ghana Sets Ratings Record | Apple Settles eBook Suit

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USA-Ghana Sets Ratings Record for ESPN (TVNewser)
ESPN’s last World Cup before turning over the broadcast rights to Fox Sports is off to a good start: Monday night’s USA-Ghana match was the most-watched men’s soccer match ever on ESPN or ESPN2, drawing 11.1 million viewers per minute. Capital New York Univision averaged 4.8 million viewers for its language coverage, according to overnight data from Nielsen. All told, an average of 16 million people watched the game live on television, with at least 1.4 million more watching (legally) online. Bleacher Report But even before that game, ESPN was already enjoying some of its best ratings ever. Through the first 11 games, the networks of ESPN, ESPN2 and ABC had averaged about 3.7 million viewers. That was a 2 percent bump over the 2010 World Cup, which of course included a weekend game featuring the United States and England on ABC. If the ratings from that England match are removed, ratings were up a rather mind-blowing 37 percent. AllFacebook Team USA’s thrilling 2-1 victory caused some 10 million Facebook users to produce more than 15 million interactions on the social network, according to the Facebook Data Science Team. Variety The soccer tourney has already broken the previous global record for online-video streaming. Monday’s Germany-Portugal match drove a peak of 4.3 terabits per second of streaming video on the Akamai Technologies content-delivery network — blasting past the previous high of 3.5 Tbps for the U.S.-Canada men’s hockey semifinal during the 2014 Winter Olympics. The streaming-video peak for the USA-Ghana match came in at 3.2 Tbps, behind last Friday’s 3.5 Tbps for the Spain-Netherlands contest, according to Akamai.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: AT&T to Acquire DirecTV | NYT Publisher Speaks | CNN Fires Editor

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AT&T to Buy DirecTV for $48.5 Billion (NYT / DealBook)
AT&T formally agreed on Sunday to buy DirecTV for about $48.5 billion, striking another transaction meant to overhaul the American telecommunications landscape. CNNMoney The boards of the two companies met on Sunday to approve the plan. “This is a unique opportunity that will redefine the video entertainment industry and create a company able to offer new bundles and deliver content to consumers across multiple screens — mobile devices, TVs, laptops, cars and even airplanes,” said Randall Stephenson, the chief executive of AT&T, in a statement. WSJ Just months ago, Comcast Corp. announced a $45 billion agreement to buy Time Warner Cable, a combination that would serve close to 30 million video subscribers, after proposed divestitures. Meanwhile, Sprint Corp. continues to work on a bid for smaller rival T-Mobile US Inc., people familiar with the matter say. The deal for DirecTV gives AT&T almost 26 million pay TV subscribers and a national footprint in the business at a time when the telecom carrier sees video delivery as core to its future. The Associated Press Dallas-based AT&T’s proposed combination could improve its Internet service by pushing its existing U-verse TV subscribers into video over satellite service, and thereby free up bandwidth on its telecommunications network. AT&T currently offers a high-speed Internet plan in a bundle with DirecTV television service. The acquisition would help it further reap the benefits of that alliance. DirecTV would continue to be based in El Segundo, Calif., following the merger. The companies expect the deal to close within 12 months following a government review.

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