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Posts Tagged ‘Matt Winkler’

Bloomberg, DuJour, The Guardian Make Moves

A few Revolving Door notes today, involving Bloomberg, DuJour and The Guardian. Details are below.

  • Bill Grueskin, Columbia Journalism School’s dean of academic affairs for the past six years, is joining Bloomberg as executive editor for training. According to a memo from Matt Winkler, Bloomberg’s editor-in-chief, “Bill will help ensure that Bloomberg journalism in all its forms engages our audiences, from terminal to the Web and mobile, as the indispensable provider of news to the global business community.”
  • Ashley Parrish has been named chief digital officer of DuJour Media Group. She comes to the company from DailyCandy, where she served as editor-in-chief.
  • Jonathan Shainin is joining The Guardian as a longform editor. Shainin most recently served as The New Yorker’s online news editor. Previously he served as a senior editor for The Caravan.
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Patrick Smith Recalls Bloomberg, Tribune Apologies

The headline for Patrick Smith‘s latest Salon op-ed is a good one: “Get Over Yourself, New York Times. You’re Not Standing Up to Anyone.”

SalonLogoBut the first few sentences of his article might be even better:

They say fiction has had its day, given over to Brooklyn-dwellers with nothing to say. True and not. Our newspapers provide splendid fiction. It is a golden age.

From 1985 to 1992, Smith was the International Herald Tribune bureau chief in Hong Kong and then Tokyo. During that time, he also wrote “Letter from Tokyo” for the New Yorker.

He takes informed, cynical stock of the current struggles of the New York Times and Bloomberg News to get their China-correspondent visas renewed for 2014. Smith also candidly explains how he sometimes failed the related white-knight test:

My own batting average is one for three. I was expelled from Singapore in the early 1980s, and my magazine at the time, the regrettably defunct Far Eastern Economic Review, kept the bureau open and listed it on the masthead with a blank where the bureau chief’s name would have gone. This went on for years.

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Bloomberg News Makes Several Moves

Bloomberg News has made several changes. Below are the highlights, followed by the full note from Matt Winkler, Bloomberg News’ editor.

  • Katherine Snyder has been named executive editor of breaking news.
  • Dan Golden has been named managing editor for education and enterprise in company news.
  • Winnie O’Kelley is now managing editor of the new global financial crimes group.
  • Jeff McCracken has been named managing editor for the global M&A team.
  • Edward Evans is now deputy managing editor for global finance.

 

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Bloomberg News Shifts Management

Bloomberg News logo GBloomberg News is set to make some major changes involving management. The Wall Street Journal reports that the moves are designed to streamline the company’s editorial structure. The moves expected to be announced:

  • Laurie Hays, currently executive editor, will take on a larger role — including economics and Washington — and thus assume oversight over a larger group of reporters and editors. Hays will continue to report to Matt Winkler, Bloomberg News’ editor.
  • Daniel Hertzberg, executive editor of finance, is retiring. He’ll remain an editor-at-large until he steps down in February. Hertzberg will be succeeded by Otis Bilodeau, currently managing editor of Bloomberg News’ finance group.
  • Reto Gregori will become deputy editor-in-chief. He’ll keep his role as chief of staff to Winkler.

Josh Tyrangiel, The Man Behind Businessweek

In the WWD profile of Bloomberg Businessweek Editor Josh Tyrangiel this morning we learn a lot of things about the man behind the magazine.

For one, everyone, and we mean everyone, likes the guy (including us, check out our Media Beat interview with him from last May). For Matt Winkler, Editor-in-Chief of Bloomberg News, meeting Tyrangiel was “love at first sight.” Norman Pearlstine, who brought Tyrangiel aboard, said he showed promise early on from his days at Time:

What I saw was somebody who had been able to get the respect of a lot of very senior people within Time magazine and the Time Inc. organization. He was part of a new breed who understood both digital and print.

It also seems like Tyrangiel understands what Businessweek needs to attract a bigger audience:

What I’m trying to figure out is, how can we interest them? It’s this real balance between being comprehensive, making sure we prepare them for everything that’s coming in the week ahead and taking them out of their comfort zone.

Despite the changes – the magazine is considerably more colorful and features are more focused than before – the numbers at Businessweek haven’t picked up just yet. But maybe Tyrangiel’s influence is just starting to set in.

Exclusive: Veteran Anchor Mike Schneider Discusses His Time at Bloomberg

mike schnieder4.jpgBetween February 3 and 4 of 2009, more than 100 Bloomberg Radio and TV staffers were laid off at their world headquarters in New York.

It was an unprecedented move for Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s financial news outlet, with no layoffs in the company’s previous 28 years of existence.

One of those people sent packing was notable news anchor Mike Schneider. Schneider granted FishbowlNY an exclusive interview–his first since leaving Bloomberg LP.

“The night before it happened I actually looked at Norm Barnett [6pm producer] and I said, ‘I’ll see you tomorrow.’”

Barnett’s response, according to Schneider, “You think so?”

Both men laughed knowing what the next day would likely bring.

When the next day arrived, as anticipated, Schneider had an impromptu meeting with Andy Lack [chief executive for multimedia unit].

“I knew what was coming by the time I went up to discuss it with him,” Schneider recalls.

His first words after Lack informed him were “These things are never pretty.”

To which, according to Schneider, Lack replied, “No, they’re not.”

“He [Lack] was very respectful of me, and I harbor no hard feelings, whatsoever,” Schneider says. “He’s got a job to do over there, and he felt that these things were necessary.”

Looking back at the events of 18 months ago, Schneider brings his signature gravitas to the situation.

“I’ve been in this business for three decades. I’ve seen cutbacks come in every decade,” Schneider says. “With what was going on on Wall Street, and with the fact that leadership had changed at Bloomberg in order to try to deal with the new realities of the business world…I wasn’t surprised.”

But the veteran newsman was concerned for his talented friends who joined him on the unemployment line.

“A lot of the people with whom I worked that got laid off were, and are, very good people,” Schneider says. “Nobody likes to see good people get hurt.”

After the jump, Schneider discusses why he’d enjoy a return to Bloomberg.

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