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Posts Tagged ‘Matthew Keys’

Disgraced NTSB Intern Gets Quick Offer

Late last night, Matthew Keys exclusively revealed the identity of the NTSB intern who confirmed to San Francisco’s KTVU the epic-prank names of those four Asiana pilots. This particular The Desk dispatch suggests that Cornell University is today dealing with its own PR nightmare.

Keys’ blog post quickly led to an alternate offer of summer break employment for the NTSB free agent. It came this morning at 12:12 a.m. ET, from SpinMedia website What Would Tyler Durden Do:

We would like to offer Mr. Fields-Lefkovic a highly valuable learning work experience at WWTDD for the remainder of this summer. I think we offer college credit or something that makes these summer slave labor arrangements fully legal. Alex, call us.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Howard Kurtz Apologizes | Keys Gets Revenge | WaPo Earnings Plunge


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Howard Kurtz Apologizes on CNN For Errors (Politico)
Howard Kurtz took to his Reliable Sources show on CNN on Sunday to apologize for his “inexcusable” erroneous report last week about NBA player Jason Collins and for a string of past mistakes that the media critic admitted he was sometimes too slow to correct. During Kurtz’s extraordinary 15-minute long confession of journalistic sins, he repeatedly said he’s learned a lesson and promised to double and triple-check all his facts in the future to win back the trust of readers and viewers. TVNewser NPR’s David Folkenflik and Politico‘s Dylan Byers grilled Kurtz about Collins as well as other mistakes from the past that Kurtz admitted he had sometimes waited too long to correct. It was riveting, powerful, and frequently uncomfortable to watch. The live interrogation on CNN was not Kurtz’ idea. HuffPost / The Backstory Kurtz claimed Sunday that Daily Download, a site founded by USA Today veteran Lauren Ashburn, has “always been a limited venture for me.” The Knight Foundation provided a $115,000 grant for the Daily Download project in December 2011, via Maryland Public Television, and provided a second $115,000 grant in November 2012. A Knight Foundation spokesman told HuffPost that Kurtz’s “involvement was a factor in our support for the Daily Download.” Daily Download / Lauren Ashburn In a regular Daily Download feature where Kurtz and I comment on the day’s media news, he made a mistake. And so did I. As founder and editor-in-chief, I am responsible for what goes on Daily Download. I am committed to being more vigilant to ensure our facts are correct and that we are more transparent if issues arise. Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Howard Kurtz Apologizes | Keys Gets Revenge | WaPo Earnings Plunge


arrow_hp.jpgClick here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Howard Kurtz Apologizes on CNN For Errors (Politico)
Howard Kurtz took to his Reliable Sources show on CNN on Sunday to apologize for his “inexcusable” erroneous report last week about NBA player Jason Collins and for a string of past mistakes that the media critic admitted he was sometimes too slow to correct. During Kurtz’s extraordinary 15-minute long confession of journalistic sins, he repeatedly said he’s learned a lesson and promised to double and triple-check all his facts in the future to win back the trust of readers and viewers. TVNewser NPR’s David Folkenflik and Politico‘s Dylan Byers grilled Kurtz about Collins as well as other mistakes from the past that Kurtz admitted he had sometimes waited too long to correct. It was riveting, powerful, and frequently uncomfortable to watch. The live interrogation on CNN was not Kurtz’ idea. HuffPost / The Backstory Kurtz claimed Sunday that Daily Download, a site founded by USA Today veteran Lauren Ashburn, has “always been a limited venture for me.” The Knight Foundation provided a $115,000 grant for the Daily Download project in December 2011, via Maryland Public Television, and provided a second $115,000 grant in November 2012. A Knight Foundation spokesman told HuffPost that Kurtz’s “involvement was a factor in our support for the Daily Download.” Daily Download / Lauren Ashburn In a regular Daily Download feature where Kurtz and I comment on the day’s media news, he made a mistake. And so did I. As founder and editor-in-chief, I am responsible for what goes on Daily Download. I am committed to being more vigilant to ensure our facts are correct and that we are more transparent if issues arise.

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Reuters Fires Staffer Accused of Aiding Hacking Group [Updated]

Matthew Keys, Reuters’ social media editor, has been fired. In March, Keys was indicted by the Department of Justice for allegedly aiding Anonymous, the computer hacking group. Keys was charged with giving computer log-in information to Anonymous, who then used it to hack into the Los Angeles Times.

When news of Keys’ indictment broke, Reuters suspended him. According to Keys, he is now officially unemployed:

Update (5:00 pm):
The Newspaper Guild of New York says Keys was “fired without cause.” Below is the full statement:

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Reuters Social Media Staffer Indicted for Allegedly Aiding Computer Hacking

Matthew Keys, a deputy social media editor at Reuters, has been indicted by the Department of Justice for his alleged involvement with Anonymous, a computer hacking group. Politico reports that Keys is charged with providing Anonymous members with log-in information to Tribune Company computer servers.

According to a DOJ release, Keys began working with Anonymous when he worked for Fox 40, a Tribune Company network:

Keys identified himself on an Internet chat forum as a former Tribune Company employee and provided members of Anonymous with a login and password to the Tribune Company server. After providing log-in credentials, Keys allegedly encouraged the Anonymous members to disrupt the website. According to the indictment, at least one of the computerhackers used the credentials provided by Keys to log into the Tribune Company server, and ultimately that hacker made changes to the web version of a Los Angeles Times news feature.

Keys’ employment status is currently unknown, but a Reuters employee said his desk was being disassembled and his security pass was deactivated.

The three counts Keys faces each carry a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and fines up to $250,000.

Reuters Social Media Editor Matthew Keys Indicted for Aiding Anonymous

OK, this is an odd one. Matthew Keys, a social media editor at Reuters and a former employee of the Tribune Company-owned Fox affiliate KTXL in Sacramento, has just been charged by the feds with helping Anonymous hack into the Tribune Company website in late 2010. More specifically, they are charging Keys with giving away log in keys to the Tribune website in an online chat room. Someone then took the log in data and used it to mess with the online version of an LA Times news story.

From the Times:

The indictment says Keys provided members of the hacker group Anonymous with log-in credentials for a computer server belonging to KTXL FOX 40’s corporate parent, the Tribune Co.

According to the indictment, Keys identified himself on an Internet chat forum as a former Tribune Co. employee.

After providing log-in credentials, Keys allegedly encouraged the Anonymous members to disrupt the website.  According to the indictment, at least one of the computer hackers used the credentials provided by Keys to log into the Tribune Co. server, and ultimately that hacker made changes to the web version of a Los Angeles Times news feature.

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Reuters’ Deputy Social Media Editor Was Addicted to Twitter

Twitter can be a great tool, unless you let it take over your life. That’s the lesson Reuters’ deputy social media editor Matthew Keys has finally realized after tweeting over 46,000 times. In an interview with Adweek, Keys said that he decided to unplug from Twitter because he had become obsessed with it.

Don’t believe that someone can become addicted to Twitter? Check out this quote from Keys:

I found myself staying awake until midnight or 1 or 2 in the morning and then having to come in to work the next day exhausted, unable to focus. The wheels kept spinning even when the machine was exhausted. In this industry, that’s been known to happen. But for me, it was happening a lot. That’s not healthy for anyone, and a lot of things suffer because of it. Your work suffers, your relationships suffer. You start using the platform to have meaningful interactions with people, and you substitute it for the meaningful interactions you could have in person. You put a lot of things on hold or on a delay or skip out on them altogether, and sometimes you have to in order to get the job done. But if you’re constantly doing it — and I was constantly doing it — that’s not healthy.

If you didn’t already know Keys was referring to Twitter, you’d think he was talking about gambling, drugs or anything else that is known to destroy people. Hopefully Keys’ indefinite break helps him deal with the problem.

Reuters Adds Deputy Social Media Editor

Reuters has named Matthew Keys its new Deputy Social Media Editor. Keys most recently worked at Sacramento-based KTXL Fox40 as an Online Content Producer and Manager and an Online News Producer for KGO-TV in San Francisco. During this time Keys was nominated for an Online News Association Award for his coverage of the Japan earthquake and tsunami.

At Reuters he will be responsible for expanding the organization’s social media presences and training other Reuters journalists.

Keys will be based in New York and report to Anthony De Rosa, Reuters’ Social Media Editor.