TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Megan McArdle’

ASME Says Criticism of Nominations is ‘Kind of Silly’

Yesterday, when FishbowlNY covered the 2012 National Magazine Award finalists, we expected the typical backlash against the major publishing houses and our fine city. While there was some of that, many people took the ASME to task for the noticeable lack of women writers.

As Ann Friedman — the Executive Editor of GOOD noted, “Women hold their own or dominate in servicey categories (public interest, personal service) and fiction. They are not represented at all in the categories of reporting, feature writing, profile writing, essays and criticism, columns and commentary.” Alyssa Rosenberg, writing for Think Progress, added that the “women’s” category ends up hurting female writers:

The division in General Excellence creates an incentive for women’s magazines to genuinely specialize their coverage across the board, while men’s magazines have incentives to commission features and criticism that compete with publications like the New Yorker and The Atlantic.

Sid Holt, the ASME’s Chief Executive, brushed off the criticism. He wrote to Poynter and said it was all “Kind of silly,” went through the selection process and cited past nominations as proof that there is no bias:

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Matt Taibbi vs. Megan McArdle: Water for Billionaires

This is too good not to post. Rolling Stone‘s Matt Taibbi and his Randoid nemesis from The Atlantic Megan McArdle were both on “CNN Your Money” together over the weekend, discussing whether Goldman Sachs officials should be prosecuted for their role in the implosion of the global economy–and the collapse of the Southern California real estate market.

These two have sparred before, but never on TV together. Interesting to see just how glib and shameless McArdle comes across onscreen, carrying water for the richest criminals in the world.
Read more

The eXiled Finally Given Props for Uncovering Koch Brothers/Tea Party Connection

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Back in February of 2009, eXiled editors Mark Ames and Yasha Levine wrote a piece for Playboy.com that uncovered the connection between the Tea Party and a previously quiet, shadowy pair of billionaires known as the Koch brothers. Almost immediately after publication, the piece was slammed by the mainstream press and Playboy wound up pulling the piece–although they never ran a correction. More than two years later, after a popular New Yorker piece shed light on the Koch brothers and the full extent of their political undertakings, Ames and Levine are feeling a might peeved about their treatment. The pair went on The Dylan Ratigan Show yesterday to talk about the backlash they received when they initially published the story, and how their reporting has since been vindicated.

Ames also wrote this blistering piece calling out The Atlantic‘s Megan McArdle, among other journalists, who trashed Ames and Levine’s reporting while failing to disclose the full extent of their personal and financial connections to the Koch brothers. Worth the read.

The Business Insider Continues Its Content Sharing Conquest

logo-tbi.jpgDon’t be alarmed if you start to see articles from The Atlantic‘s Megan McArdle reprinted in full on another Web site. It’s just The Business Insider again, striking another content-sharing deal like the one it has with Gawker Media, allowing the site to go all Huffington Post and reprint entire pieces from other news organizations without being slammed by copyright infringement claims (which in today’s digital market, is becoming an increasingly tricky area to corral).

We’ve heard that TBI has cut more of these content-sharing deals with smaller blogs, and that its page The Tape often features occasional outside posts from these publications, along with its regular RSS feed.

When we wrote about Business Insider’s deal with Gawker, we asked if there was any benefit to sharing complete content beyond the obvious: more content and more exposure. While we still don’t have our answer, the number of media organizations willing to jump on these deals proves that there’s something in it for them after all, even if we don’t know what.

Check it out: The Healthcare Debate Is A Kabuki Theatre Of Incoherence –The Business Insider

Previously: Gawker, The Business Insider Join Forces,

Atlantic Wire Launches With (Media) Star-Studded Fete

atlantic wire 1.jpgAll of the (op-ed) stars were out last night to celebrate the launch of Atlantic Wire, the opinion aggregating sister site to TheAtlantic.com.

Writers for The Atlantic and TheAtlantic.com like Corby Kummer, Marc Ambinder, Ta-Nehisi Coates and Megan McArdle sipped champagne or checked out the incredible view from the balcony at The Glass Houses on the top floor of the Chelsea Arts Tower, as slides of the Atlantic 50 streamed above the bar.

Atlantic Consumer Media chair David Bradley, president Justin Smith and editor James Bennet later said a few words for the crowd, which included The New York Times‘s Frank Rich and David Carr, Rachel Sklar and Glynnis MacNicol from Mediaite.com and AOL DailyFinance‘s Jeff Bercovici.

“We like to fight with each other,” Bennet said of the impetus behind launching Atlantic Wire, which gathers some of the best opinions on the biggest topics of the day in one place.

Bradley, who leads arguably one of the few media companies that is growing despite the recession, offered some advice to would-be media moguls. “Before you own a media company, you should own a company that does well,” he said, noting how his previous experience in business allowed him to effectively operate Atlantic Consumer Media.

Well he certainly knows how to put on a party.

More photos after the jump

Read more

‘This is William Kristol’s Last Column’

kristol-190a.jpgAll good things must come to an end. Also Bill Kristol‘s (ambivalent) time at The New York Times — an appointment that has continued to puzzle and frustrate Times readers since it was announced over a year ago. In his last column Kristol declares that “Jan. 20, 2009, marked the end of a conservative era,” a tacked on to the end of the column notes that “This is Bill Kristol’s last column.” Who the Times will pick to fill the conservative space at the paper remains to be seen (anyone have suggestions? Ross Douthat and Megan McArdle are two names being bandied around).

Over at The Daily Beast Scott Horton speculates that the reason for Kristol’s departure has nothing to do with his neo-conservative views but with more “fundamental” problems.

Kristol’s writing wasn’t compelling or even very careful. He either lacked a talent for solid opinion journalism or wasn’t putting his heart into it.

On his Twitter feed Jay Rosen remarks that “The New York Times will be poorer, not for having dumped Bill Kristol, but for not explaining — even to itself — what went wrong, why he failed. So maybe a job for Clark Hoyt this week! Meanwhile it seems Kristol has landed on his feet (sort of).

Read more

TheAtlantic.com Launches Business Channel

atlanbusy.pngTheAtlantic.com appears to be continuing its march to online dominance with the announcement that it has launched a business channel. Business.TheAtlantic.com, which went live today (Bank of America is the launch sponsor) will be edited by Megan McArdle and focus on business and economics featuring “original posts, dispatches, interviews and more from a range of experts”, including The Atlantic‘s Tyler Cowen, Conor Clarke, Arnold Kling, Jim Manzi, Grant McCracken, and Bart Wilson. The page will be edited Currently running on the site is an interview with uber-business journalist Michael Lewis.

According to The Atlantic this is just the first of several new online channels to be introduced. Full release after the jump.

Read more

The NYT Tightens Its Belt, Adds Bono to the Masthead

NYT annual reportgg-1.jpgLots of New York Times news to discuss today! You may recall, way back in the early days of August before Sarah Palin was even a glimmer in John McCain‘s eye, that we told you how the NYT Co. was under increases pressure to cut its dividends (simply put: “it has to stop paying its shareholders so much money and use some of its finite cash to pay off its bonds”). Bloomberg is now reporting the company is considering doing just that, or perhaps even dropping dividends altogether(!) after “reporting a loss on severance costs and a steeper drop in advertising sales.” Keep in mind that the NYT Co. has a $1.1 billion debt and pays the controlling Ochs-Sulzberger family a $25.1 million a year dividend. Time for some belt-tightening we thinks!

But that is not all, by a long shot. Because if you were the national paper of record, as well as (by far), the best example of how a newspaper should go about transitioning to the online world, and you found yourself struggling, what would you do? Hire a celebrity for your op-ed pages, of course!

Read more

The Atlantic Redesigns Both Online and in Print

magcov2.jpgThe Atlantic, the 150 year old magazine that has managed to make itself relevant online, has a new look! The Atlantic‘s online relevance is, in our opinion, largely due to its line-up of stellar bloggers (our affinity for Andrew Sullivan is no secret, however, Marc Ambinder is also a staple and anyone not already reading Ta-Nahisi Coates should begin immediately), and apparenly as part of the redesign each has been assigned their own color (Andrew has a shade of blue, Megan McArdle green, Ta-Nehisi silver).

In a post on the homepage editor James Bennet explained to readers what other changes they may encounter at both the site and the print magazine.

Read more