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Posts Tagged ‘Men’s Vogue’

Condé Nast Plans Men’s Wear Trade

dnr cover.jpgAs we mentioned last week, on New Year’s Eve Mediaweek reported on rumors that Condé Nast‘s Fairchild Fashion Group, which publishes Women’s Wear Daily, is working on a trade publication that will focus on the men’s wear market.

This report adds intel that the publication is set to launch in June, and it will be led by WWD‘s editor Ed Nardoza and publisher Marc Berger, the former Men’s Vogue publisher who was brought on as publisher of Footwear News, another Fairchild trade pub, in June.

Mediaweek was also unclear how the new magazine would differ from DNR, which Condé folded into WWD just over a year ago. If it turns out to be a weekly, the new pub will likely be the same as the shuttered 115-year-old trade magazine, but if it turns out to be a monthly, it will look more like Menswear, DNR‘s sister pub that also closed up shop in 2008.

Read more: Condé Nast to Launch Fashion Trade PubMediaweek

Previously: Year-end Condé Nast News

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WSJ. Magazine Booms Despite Tough Market

wsj_c3333over.jpgIt may be a terrible year for the print industry, with diminishing ad sales forcing magazines to scale back on the number of issues and pages they can afford, but at least one magazine is claiming that they’re doing better than ever.

The Wall Street Journal‘s one-year-old magazine, WSJ. (can’t forget that unnecessary period!) will begin printing six issues a year instead of its traditional quarterly print run, starting in March of next year. In addition, the glossy’s circulation will almost double from its current 800,000 subscribers to 1.5 million.

“The magazine speaks directly to the world’s most discerning consumers about the people, places and products that matter most to them,” saied WSJ. editor-in-chief Tina Gaudoin, who is perhaps forgetting the lessons learned this year in the closing of haute business and lifestyle titles like Trump Magazine, Portfolio, and Fortune Small Business.

Then again, The Wall Street Journal has managed to make itself an exception to every industry rule this year and is still expanding, so perhaps some of that luck will rub off on WSJ.

Full press release after the jump.

Previously: Tina Gaudoin To Edit WSJ Lifestyle Magazine

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What’s Left At Condé Nast?

conde nast logo.jpgCondé Nast is one of the largest magazine publishers in the U.S., and the news earlier this week that it was shuttering four titles really didn’t change that.

Condé still has 18 consumer magazine titles, plus two trades — WWD and Footwear News — under its Fairchild Publications arm. But the company had been working hard to streamline it portfolio in the past year. In addition to Cookie, Gourmet, Modern Bride and Elegant Bride, which all folded this week, the company has shuttered several titles this year. Men’s Vogue went a year ago, followed by men’s wear trade pub DNR (our former home), Domino and then Portfolio

So what’s left?

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Condé Nast Update: Web Site Restructuring, More Changes Ahead

men style.pngOne day after telling staff it had hired consulting company McKinsey & Co., Condé Nast announced that is was deconstructing its Men.Style.com Web site and giving the site’s related magazines, Details and GQ their own sites.

This move is long overdue, since one of the magazines encompassed by Men.Style.com — Men’s Vogue — was shuttered last year as part of Condé’s cost cutting measures. There are reports that the Men.Style.com staff will be moved over to GQ.com, but we’re sure this is just the beginning of restructuring to come at the company now that McKinsey is on board.

Since the announcement yesterday, one anonymous tipster let us know what the experience was like when McKinsey was hired by Times Mirror Magazines in the 1980s. Then-president Francis Pandolfi called the staff into a rented out movie theatre and gave a prophetic speech.

“Look to your left, look to your right — your neighbor may not be here after this initiative,” Pandolfi said, according to our source. The company then hired McKinsey and spent a $1 million, which was quite a lot 20 years ago. The result? “Many people lost their jobs and then the company was bought out,” our tipster said.

Read on for a translation of yesterday’s Condé Nast memo.

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Author & Columnist Michael M. Thomas Talks Condé Nast On The Menu: “There Are Problems That You Can’t Consult Your Way Out Of”

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Today on the media- bistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven were joined by novelist and newspaper columnist Michael M. Thomas to talk the morning’s media headlines.

The first topic tackled was the news that magazine publisher Condé Nast had hired consulting company McKinsey & Co..

“What management consulting companies are there to do is to protect the people…who hired them,” Thomas said. “When I heard that Condé Nast had hired McKinsey, I have to say, based on my own experience…I am both surprised and not optimistic. Unless McKinsey can deploy literally millions of consultants around the country to get people to start reading newspapers again, I can’t see what good they would do at a creative outfit like Condé Nast.”

According to Thomas, Condé was once a thriving company thanks to the “healthy cash flow” produced by the newspaper side, which was then invested into Condé’s popular magazines. “Si Newhouse is undoubtedly some kind of genius when it comes to magazine publishing,” Thomas said.

However, as the newspaper industry started to fail, Condé faltered, closing a handful of titles in the past year — including business mag Portfolio, Domino and Men’s Vogue — and cutting costs, and staff, across the board. But Thomas said he doesn’t think McKinsey will be able to do much more than dispatch more staffers. “There are just business problems that you can’t consult your way out of,” he said.

Also discussed: the future of the book industry and Thomas’s book, “Love & Money.” “There’s nothing in this book that couldn’t happen and, in some cases, came very close to happening,” he said.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Ex Men’s Vogue Publisher Finds A New Home At Conde Nast

berger.jpgThree months after Richard Beckman took over as CEO of Conde Nast-owned Fairchild Fashion Group, he has made his first big hire. Beckman has brought on former Men’s Vogue publisher Marc Berger as publisher of trade pub Footwear News.

Berger has replaced Jay Spaleta, who was named publisher of WWD in April 2004 and moved to oversee the smaller trade publications DNR and FN in August 2007. After DNR folded last year, Spaleta’s only charge was FN, Conde Nast‘s smallest magazine.

Berger was previously the publisher at Conde title Men’s Vogue which folded last year. Before that, he worked at Details (also Spaleta’s former home), Cargo, Vanity Fair and GQ.

Full release after the jump

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Swine Flu Hits Conde Nast As Newhouse Profile Hits Newsstands

nymag.pngThis morning, a warning went out to all of Conde Nast‘s New York employees that an employee on the 12th floor of the company’s 4 Times Square headquarters had tested positive for swine flu. (If you’re hip to Conde HQ you know that floor is where Vogue is housed.)

But since the memo noted that the infected employee is “under a doctor’s care and currently recovering at home,” the media company was probably more worried this morning about the latest New York magazine cover story, which profiled Conde chairman Si Newhouse.

Steve Fishman‘s in-depth profile attempts to get to the heart of Newhouse’s psyche, quoting an anonymous source who calls him “semi-blank,” and asserting that he surrounds himself with superstar editors who represent a part of himself that he can’t express on his own. “In a sense, he’s like a polished surface, and the editors tend to see themselves in him,” Fishman wrote.

And of course Fishman can’t ignore the fact that Conde Nast is in the red despite closing a number of magazines in the past two years, including, most recently, Portfolio. Still, he points out that “The belief around the building is that next year, if the economy recovers, Conde Nast will again turn profitable.” Fishman doesn’t let on if he agrees, but he does mention that there are still rumors of more magazine closings to come. “Which will be next? Wired? Architectural Digest? Does the company really need two food magazines?”

As a former Conde employee ourselves, we did find at least one omission in Fishman’s reporting. His list of shuttered publications — Jane, House & Garden, Men’s Vogue, Golf for Women, Domino and Portfolio — he left out our former home, the men’s wear trade DNR.

Has Conde Nast Finally Seen the Internet Light?

voguenet.pngIs Conde Nast finally ready to set foot in the land called Internet? You will recall the company had a rough ride last November, all but shuttering Men’s Vogue and laying off more than three dozen staffers from CondeNet, its online division — a move which caused observers to ponder Conde’s “tortured relationship” with the Internet and habit of using its sites merely as a portal to sell more magazines. Well looks like this attitude may be getting an overhaul (and not a minute too soon!).

AdAge reports (full press release after the jump) that CondeNet is set to be eliminated altogether and that its functions (the aforementioned selling of ad space) will be consolidated, along with the rest of the company’s digital operations, under Conde Nast Digital, to be run by Sarah Chubb former president of CondeNet. Says one media buyer: “For the advertiser, this will help streamline the conversation to get the deals done in a more timely basis — one-stop shopping vs. multiple contact points.”

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Flip.com to Close December 16

flipggscreenshot.jpgConde Nast suffered another blow today with news that Flip.com, their online social-networking/scrapbooking site aimed at teenage girls, was shutting down effective December 16. Users received an email earlier today (read after the jump) alerting them to the closure and suggesting that if they have “any flipbooks that you would like to save before this date, we suggest you print them.”

Conde spent a lot of money to purchase the site back in early 2007 and in 2008, in an attempt to broaden its audience, began advertising on Facebook. Conde Nast has not been having an easy time of it, back in October editors were told they had to cut their staffs and budgets each by five percent — Men’s Vogue and Portfolio were subsequently downscaled. Calls to Flip.com’s spokesperson regarding the reasons for the closure have not yet been returned.

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Portfolio.com Also Being Severely Scaled Back?

portfolio.gifThis must have been what it felt like to work on Wall St. a few weeks ago. After announcing company wide cutbacks this morning, followed by news that both Men’s Vogue and Portfolio were going to be scaled back there are rumors that Conde Nast is going to cut the portfolio.com website down to virtually nil. Peter Kafka at Media Memo is reporting that the website staff of roughly two dozen will be cut down to as little as three and that the decisions as to who will go and who will stay will be made over the next few days. Reports Silicon Alley Insider: “It’s a bloodbath,” we hear, “But a very slow and polite one.”

No doubt there are a lot of financial intricacies at work here that we have no idea about, but why you would want to cut the website of a publication geared to covering all aspects of the business industry during a financial crisis is really beyond us. Seems like the website was Portfolio‘s best, strongest chance at relevance. Stay tuned.

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