TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Michael Kinsley’

Jill Abramson: The NY Times Will Still be in Print in Five Years

As part of The New Republic’s special New York Times package, Jill Abramson, the paper’s executive editor, spoke with Michael Kinsley. Here are our favorite quotes from Abramson.

On the rumor that she’s mean:

Well my answer is, I’m not. And most of the people who know me well are somewhat surprised by that stereotype, just because I’m not someone who frequently expresses anger or acts in a high-handed way. I’m trying to think of the other stereotypical behaviors.

On the Times being perceived as a liberal paper:

Abe Rosenthal was once asked what he wanted on his headstone, and he said he wanted it just to say, ‘He kept the paper straight.’ And I think about that a lot. You can verify that in news meetings I sometimes say, ‘This is skewed too far to the left,’ or ‘The mix of stories seems overweeningly appealing to a reader with a certain set of sensibilities and it shouldn’t.’

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Starting August 18, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career in our online boot camp, Freelancing 101! Through a series of weeklong webcasts, you'll hear from freelancing experts who will teach you the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and securing new clients. Register now! 

Michael Kinsley Returns to The New Republic

Michael Kinsley is going back to his roots. According to The Huffington Post, Kinsley is returning to The New Republic, where he once worked for 20 years, as an editor-at-large. Kinsley was most recently with Bloomberg View, but he will leave that position in March.

“Mike Kinsley is a legend in the world of journalism, and we are fortunate to be welcoming him back home to The New Republic,” Chris Hughes, publisher and editor-in-chief of TNR, told HuffPost in a written statement. “His writerly wit and editorial voice left an indelible mark on the place when he edited the magazine 25 years ago. Much has changed since then, but Mike’s talents are timeless. He will be an incredibly important resource as we reinvent the magazine for a new age.”

At TNR, Kinsley will focus on interviews.

New York Times Movie Review Slams ‘Page One: Inside the New York Times’

Michael Kinsley, senior editorial adviser for Bloomberg View, posted a film review of Andrew Rossi‘s documentary  “Page One: Inside the New York Times” in the movie review section of the Times today, and it’s scathing, to say the least. He writes that the movie is “in a word, a mess.”

The documentary stars Times journalists Brian Stelter, David Carr, and other Times major players, and though there have been some mixed reactions from Times insiders, it’s still jarring to see such a takedown of the film. Kinsley begins by ostensibly explaining why he is writing the review, which is that even though the people who put out the newspaper “know far more than I do about The Times and are better positioned to judge the movie,” there is a “conflict of interest.” He however knows “almost nothing about how The New York Times works.”

But then he adds: “Having seen “Page One,” I don’t know much more than I did before… It flits from topic to topic, character to character, explaining almost nothing.”

Here are some choice quotes:

The movie’s main theme, no surprise, is the struggle of The Times to survive in the age of the Internet. But it does little to illuminate that struggle, preferring instead a constant parade of people telling the camera how dreadful it would be if The Times did not survive. True, of course, but boring to the point of irritation after five or six repetitions.

Read more

Bloomberg View Aiming for Late May Launch

Bloomberg View – Michael Bloomberg’s attempt to flex some opinionated muscle – is going to launch in late May. According to Keith Kelly, in anticiaption of that fast aprroaching date, the venture has added some new names.

In addition to the many recent hires that FishbowlNY has covered, Kelly says that Bloomberg View will bring the nomadic Michael Kinsley and the former Wall Street Journal News Editor George Anders on as Editorial Board members, as well as author William Cohan and Ron Klain, a man who served as Chief of Staff for both Al Gore and Joe Biden.

That’s some heavy lifting by Bloomberg. More evidence that he is going to make sure people pay attention to Bloomberg View one way or another.

Former LA Times Editor Off to Bloomberg

Michael Kinsley, who spent just more than a year as the LA Times‘ editorial-page editor back in 2004, has a new job–columnist at the soon-to-be-launched Bloomberg View. Kinsley was most recently at Politico, where he stayed for about 30 seconds or so. As Jack Shafer notes in Slate, Kinsley has a habit of leaving jobs almost as fast as he lands a new one.

Just last September, he took a columnist job with Politico. One year before that, he joined the Atlantic crew. For a brief moment in 2006, he worked for the Guardian, and before that he spent a year and some change as the editorial-page editor of the Los Angeles Times. And, from 1996 to 2002, he edited the website you just clicked on and was also its founding editor. I won’t delineate his prehistoric career path but will only mention that it included positions at CNN and Harper’s and several stints at the New Republic, not to mention his freelance positions.

Read more

Atlantic.com’s Biz Editor Out Before Site Launches

atlqqqantic.jpgBecause the world of business news isn’t saturated enough, Atlantic Media announced a new business site in October to be launched sometime this spring (after an initial push-back from this winter’s original date).

Originally, Michael Kinsley of Slate had been…er…slated to lead the site, but, according to Jeff Bercovici at DailyFinance.com, the editor/developer is out.

Said Kinsley of the mutual decision to leave the position:

“I’m not obsessed with business…I sort of looked into my soul, and Justin Smith [president of Atlantic Media] looked into my soul, and we both sort of decided that I really didn’t want to do that.”

No one has been announced to fill Kinsley’s position yet, another sign that the release date of the new site may be pushed back even further.

Read More: Kinsley Out as Editor of Atlantic’s New Business Site –Daily Finance

Previously: Slate Founder Michael Kinsley To Lead New Digital Launch For Atlantic, Changes At Atlantic Media

Atlantic Media Scoops Up Reuters.com Editor For Digital Project

adam_pasick.jpgEarlier this year, we learned of Atlantic Media‘s plans to launch a new digital property when it brought on Slate founder Michael Kinsley to oversee the mysterious project.

Today, the parent company of The Atlantic announced another new hire for the project, Adam Pasick, who will serve as managing editor. The new digital property is set to launch in early 2010 and we now know that whatever it is, it will target “global business executives.”

Previously, Pasick worked as an editor in the U.S. bureau of Reuters.com.
Atlantic Media (which also owns The National Journal Group and Government Executive magazine) has been focusing on its online presence since August of last year, when it hit a traffic peak and hired Felix DiFillipo and Bill McGarry from Forbes and CondeNet. In September, Atlantic Media launched The Atlantic Wire as a sister site to TheAtlantic.com. The Atlantic‘s most notorious columnist, Andrew Sullivan, blogs regularly, and we look forward to seeing what writers Atlantic Media scoops up for their new site.

Previously: Atlantic Shifts Tide With Hires, Atlantic Wire Launches With (Media) Star-Studded Fete

Opinion Aggregator Atlantic Wire Launches

atlanticwire.gifAtlantic Consumer Media has launched a new stand alone site The Atlantic Wire, to aggregate some of the best opinions and debates on the Web.

The Atlantic has long been a source for well-thought out opinions and discussions, and some of the voice from the magazine and its Web site, like columnist Andrew Sullivan, do make their way onto the Atlantic Wire’s homepage.

Along with tabs highlighting the biggest debates today — right now they’re “Health Care Reform,” “Joe Wilson Outburst” and “Reforming Wall Street” — that homepage also includes a link to The Atlantic 50, a ranking of the most influential pundits doing the job today. The Atlantic Wire ranks them, then features their most recent thoughts side-by-side. The New York TimesPaul Krugman tops the list, followed by Rush Limbaugh, George Will and Thomas Friedman and David Brooks, also of the Times.

Of the 50, 14 columnists hail from The Washington Post, eight from the Times, five from The Wall Street Journal and eight are primarily bloggers, including Arianna Huffington and Salon.com‘s Glenn Greenwald. There are also as well as three commentators from the Fox News, including Glenn Beck, and two from MSNBCKeith Olbermann and Rachel Maddow.

“Taking a systematic and data-driven editorial approach to the exploding universe of opinions, the Atlantic Wire helps readers engage with the most important political, business and social commentary,” said Bob Cohn, editorial director of TheAtlantic.com and the Atlantic Wire. “As readers face an overload of information and a deficit of free time, they can now visit one site to easily follow the topics they care about and the opinion-makers who fascinate them.”

The Atlantic Wire’s launch comes just days after its parent company announced that it had hired Slate founder and columnist Michael Kinsley as a columnist for The Atlantic. Kinsley was also brought on to launch a new digital project for the company early next year. We’re looking forward to seeing how that new project will complement TheAtlantic.com and Atlantic Wire.

Earlier: Slate Founder Michael Kinsley To Lead New Digital Launch For Atlantic

Slate Founder Michael Kinsley To Lead New Digital Launch For Atlantic

Atlantic Consumer Media, which publishes The Atlantic, has brought on Slate founder Michael Kinsley as a media columnist and the editor of an upcoming digital property that will launch early next year.

“As both an editor and a columnist, Michael has long been at the vanguard of publishing’s digital transformation,” said Atlantic Consumer Media President Justin B. Smith. “We are thrilled to welcome him and his considerable talents to the Atlantic Media family.”

A well-known media figure, Kinsley has been an editor at The New Republic and Harper’s and edited the opinion pages at The Los Angeles Times. He has also previously written regular columns for The Washington Post and Time magazine.

Atlantic Media didn’t provide any more detail about the upcoming digital project, but we’ll let you know if we find out any more details. The New York Times points out that Atlantic Media is also currently building Atlantic Wire, “a real-time sampling of opinion and commentary.”

Piranhas in the Fishbowl: Grazer-Gate Continues

piranhas.jpg

Andres Martinez, for such a pleasant guy, seemed to have made some LA Times enemies in his very short tenure there. All weekend, FBLA has been hearing various little snippets of rumors that Martinez was perceived as “too pro-business” or “not in touch with the rest of the paper”. LAObserved is ground zero for those who went on the record.

LATimes watcher, the late Cathy Seipp, wrote about Martinez in 2005 in the National Review Online. Then, Martinez was full of bright and shiny plans for a fresher Op-ed section with freelancers and outside experts writing editorials, readers contributing to online wikitorials, and other innovations planned under Michael Kinsley. Kinsley thinks it’s all ridiculous, but his literal-minded readers wonder why he’s posting about it.

First to crash and burn was that wikitorial.

But Martinez perked up the section, transferring some staff to news, hiring Matt Welch and Tim Cavanaugh from Reason, Rob Greene from the Weekly. Not everyone agrees that the changes were helpful.

One of those named by Martinez in his online tirade, Tim Rutten wraps himself in a few hundred words of sanctimony and loftily observes:

Like most of my colleagues at The Times, I’m fundamentally uninterested in other people’s personal lives

Which might explain why circulation has dropped so drastically in the last years. Remember when reporters were daring, risk-takers? Now they’re as prim as frontier schoolmarms, and as dull as civil servants.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>