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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Wolff’

Henry Blodget Corrects Michael Wolff

Consider this a very enlightening episode of new media vs. old(er) media.

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Following the publication of Michael Wolff‘s latest op-ed in USA Today, Henry Blodget tried to get the paper to correct several factual errors. He writes that Wolff/USA Today did not contact Business Insider prior to the publication of the piece, but that’s pretty common when the template is op-ed rather than investigative feature journalism.

Faced with a lack of USA Today correction cooperation, Blodget went ahead and noted the Wolff article mistakes at his end. Our favorite correction:

USA Today says that we recently tried to sell our company for $100 million. This is wrong. We were lucky enough to be approached by a company that was kind enough to express interest in buying us and ask what we might be willing to sell for. As nutty as it may sound, this number was significantly higher than $100 million.

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Michael Wolff: Business Insider Should Sell Now

BusinessInsiderLogoMichael Wolff has an opinion on pretty much everything. Does that make him right? No. Does his take matter more than someone else’s? Not really, my friend. But because he talks/writes a lot about media, we end up paying attention. Wolff’s latest target is Business Insider, the business and technology site edited by Henry Blodget. Wolff says it’s time for BI to sell. Before it’s too late.

According to Wolff, BI wants $100 million in cash, and that’s just not going to happen. He says BI should sell for less and do it now, because relying on digital ad dollars to support a business isn’t a good idea:

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The Nikki Finke-PMC Era is Officially Over

DeadlineHollywoodlogoIn a co-bylined post that few would have thought possible just a few months ago, Nikki Finke’s film and TV workhorses Mike Fleming Jr. and Nellie Andreeva announced at 9:26 p.m. ET tonight that their days of reporting to the volatile Finke are over:

Despite attempts by all to have it go otherwise, Nikki Finke will no longer be leading Deadline Hollywood, and she will not be writing weekend box office or filing stories going forward. This is an emotional and painful parting of the ways for us…

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Michael Wolff’s Daughter is Now an Editor-in-Chief

We honestly can’t get enough of these sorts of career trajectories. Mainly because they remind just how critical it can be for aspiring journalists and college students to get their foot in the right door, even when dad is someone famously well-connected.

Susanna Wolff started out at collegehumor.com in 2007 as an intern while attending Columbia University. In 2010, post-grad, she became the articles editor. This month, she has taken over as editor-in-chief. Her predecessor Streeter Seidell is shifting over to an editor-at-large capacity so he can more effectively pursue other his creative endeavors. From today’s announcement:

Over the years, Wolff has written more than 500 articles for College Humor, including the hit article “Facebook News Feed History of the World,” in which she translated the entire history of the world into the style of Facebook News Feeds…

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David Zaslav, David Zinczenko and the Next Big Name in Fashion

1003_mockup.gifOn any given Wednesday, the Michael’s dining room is chock full of moguls (David Zaslav, David Zinczenko) and mavens largely known to faithful readers of this column, and today was no exception. Yet, every once in a while, I’m lucky enough to meet people who, despite their impressive accomplishments, have managed to keep a relatively low profile.

Today was one of those days thanks to David Thalberg, founder of The Thalberg Group, who introduced me to a fascinating woman. If you’ve never heard of Lisa Sun, founder and CEO of Project Gravitas, trust me, you will. The Taiwanese-born, Ivy League-educated entrepreneur learned the ropes working at McKinsey & Co for 11 years, advising clients in the U.S., Asia, Europe and Latin America on strategic issues for the firm’s global luxury fashion and beauty practice. And, it’s clear in talking to her, that the inspired ideas behind her new business have been percolating for a long, long time.

Armed with degrees in biology and political science from Yale and a lifelong passion for fashion, Lisa rose through the ranks to become McKinsey’s resident expert on the luxury and fashion markets. As such, Lisa gave plenty of keynote addresses at symposiums, including the American Express Luxury Summit. While living all over the world and developing her business acumen as her career progressed, she learned quickly that dressing the part was also a key strategy in building a successful career. Having been a size 22, size 8 and “now a proud size 12,” Lisa was determined to create a line of dresses that gave style-savvy women the fashion they craved and the self-assurance they needed. And that’s how Project Gravitas was born. “We are that dress,” explained Lisa. “The one you wear on the interview where you get that job, the one that inspires you to go to that party, the one that you slip on for that very important day. It’s the one you wear that makes you feel like, ‘Bring it on!’”

Lisa Sun and Diane Clehane

The collection of 10 ‘niche dresses’, available exclusively on Project Gravitas’ website, retail between $195- $295 with free shipping and returns (“By selling online, we can keep the retail price accessible”) and are manufactured exclusively in New York with fabrics from the finest Italian mills. Here’s the real secret ingredient that is sure to attract the attention of Spanx wearers everywhere: each dress is designed with built-in shapewear from high performance moisture-wicking fabric that is breathable and machine washable. Lisa told me, “I wanted to make the ‘treat me’ dress for the young executive who wants to trade up from Zara, the ‘super mom’ who wants to look good for date night. I think of these dresses as beautifully designed safety blankets.”

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Michael Wolff: The NY Times Book Review Is Dying

Michael Wolff — the eloquent, if prickishly pugnacious media commentator — has forecast the end of yet another aging publication: The New York Times Book Review.

In his Monday column on The Guardian, Wolff forecast the demise of the last freestanding national book section, in much the way he has predicted the inevitable death of The New York Post tabloid.

“[W]hile the NYTBR has been at the very center of the book business in New York and has been the most influential voice in book culture for the better part of a century, it is surely hard to say quite what to do with this weighty history,” he wrote. “Not to mention, how to squeeze a buck out of it. The New York Times has other things to worry about.”

His news peg? The new editor, Pamela Paul, whose credentials he must consider laughable for taking over such an esteemed position.

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Michael Wolff Says New York Post Will Die Before Rupert Murdoch

Michael Wolff doesn’t exactly believe in the New York Post’s future. In a scathing column, Wolff declares that the Post is slowly dying and that it will perish before Rupert Murdoch does. Grim! Here are a few things that Wolff says point to the end of the tabloid:

    • The upcoming News Corp. split. “As Murdoch gets ready to separate his newspapers from his richer entertainment holdings in a move that will force the papers to pay their own way, the Post’s day of reckoning nears.”
    • Even Rupert Murdoch is losing faith in the paper. It has become “an increasingly sclerotic and gothic enterprise, full of aging figures.”
    • “Robert Thompson, the Wall Street Journal editor, who will be the CEO of the new newspaper company, is openly contemptuous of Col Allen and the paper’s low-rent, cowboy atmosphere.” If Robert Thompson is mad at Col Allen, imagine how Robert Thomson feels about Col Allan!
    • The paper is losing a ton of money. Wolff says it’s about $80 million per year, but we’ve heard estimates as high as $110 million.

Joe Kernen Settles a Bet, Plus the Return of Michael Wolff

1003_mockup.gifThreats of yet another winter storm (We’re begging for mercy!) didn’t keep the faithful from Michael’s today. In fact, the dining room was even more crowded than usual as some of the city’s biggest hot shots cooled their heels at the bar and in the lounge as they waited to be seated among the power brokers and media mavens. There was plenty of air kisses and glad handing among the talking heads (Joe Kernen, Rosanna Scotto), television titans (Matt Blank, Henry Schleiff) and fashionable folk (Julie Macklowe). After all, what’s the point of having a power lunch in this town if the right people aren’t there to see it — or write about it? Happy to oblige.

PR maven extraordinaire Catherine Saxton, who has represented some of Manhattan’s most well known swells (and how do you think they got that way?) invited me to join an eclectic and energetic group for lunch today. I was seated between Khashy Eyn and Daniel Hedaya of Platinum Properties and nearly got whiplash as I listened to these real estate wunderkinds regale me with tales of their incredible success since launching their firm in 2005. (Khashy, the firm’s CEO and co-founder, is 31 and Daniel, the president, is all of 26.)  Khashy, who has been in real estate since he was a teenager, came to the United States from Iran when his family fled during the revolution. Daniel, who grew up in Great Neck, dropped out of culinary school before landing a job at a boutique brokerage firm.  Khashy and his sister, co-founder and COO Dezireh Eyn (“The brains of the operation,” says Khashy), launched the company and later tapped Daniel to join them.

(Left to Right) Daniel Hedaya, Diane Clehane, Khashy Eyn, Christian Giovanni Curato, Catherine Saxton and Vicki Downey

Daniel, who will appear in episode seven of  the new season of HG-TV’s Selling New York, told me high rollers and regular folk get the same stellar treatment from the firm.  ”Whether our company is working with a client looking for a $2,500 rental or someone selling a $50 million property, we provide the same level of service. It is very important to us that everyone of our clients receive the same high level of concierge service from us. Manhattan real estate is unlike other markets in the country where the agents handle so many parts of a transaction. Here, we sell or rent the property, negotiate the deal and turn it over to an attorney. But many of our clients want us to handle everything and we do.”

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Report: Al Jazeera Finalizing Deal to Acquire Current TV

A few months ago, Michael Wolff wondered in the pages of USA TODAY - “Who Will Buy Al Gore’s Current TV?” He concluded that an Internet behemoth like The Huffington Post, Buzzfeed or even College Humor might make sense.

But according to a report this afternoon by New York Times media columnist Brian Stelter, the most interested party has turned out to be from far beyond our country’s borders, Web or otherwise:

Rather than simply use Current to distribute its English-language channel, called Al Jazeera English and based in Doha, Qatar, Al Jazeera will create a new channel based in New York, according to people with knowledge of the deal negotiations. The channel may be called Al Jazeera America. Roughly 60 percent of the programming will be produced in the United States, while the remaining 40 percent will come from Al Jazeera English.

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Gawker Lists Its Own Writers Among ’50 Least Important Writers of 2012′

If you’ve already had enough holiday cheer (which means you haven’t had enough holiday alcohol), you’ll probably enjoy Gawker’s list of the 50 Least Important Writers of 2012. And we’re not saying that just because you’re in the mood to hate, but because Gawker included its own staff on the list. Well played, Gawker.

But does Gawker including its own writers on this list mean that the site actually considers all of these people the most important? After all, the fact that they’re listed means that they’re at least somewhat important. Either way, the list is a good waste of time, if you’re looking for one.

Here’s a few other writers that made the cut:

Sorry Mediaite.

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