FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘National Public Radio’

Dave Eggers’ Inflamatory Onion Interview

Dave Eggers_1.2.jpgYou know that it’s a slow news day (except for those at CES liveblogging, of course) when the biggest scandal to hit the Web since Monday is a Dave Eggers‘ interview with The Onion‘s A.V. Club. Oh my, did he twee someone to death?

Not quite: Eggers, whose most recent project post-Where The Wild Things Are has been The San Francisco Panorama (a giant $16 glossy version of McSweeney’s that will hopefully usher back the era of print, at least in literary discussions), provoked some major criticism for his quotes in the article, where he lambastes his former employer, The San Francisco Weekly, and called the print business model “so simple.” Yikes.

The Weekly fought back, calling Eggers’ poo-pooing of third party advertisers in newspapers “too tidy” and remarking, “Could it be that Eggers is lying about his supposed proclivity for reading newspapers? Did he bump his head and forget that he worked for one that ran on an all-advertising model?”

We know that while McSweeney’s, Wholphin, The Believer, and other Eggers projects try to retain the image of being too smart for conventional methods, The Weekly may have a point. You can’t rely on your readers to shell out more money for a product before you demonstrate that it’s superior to everything else out there. And even once you do, as National Public Radio has shown us, there’s no guarantee you’re going to start seeing profits.

Read More: Dave Eggers on his favorite things about newspapers –A.V. Club

Purported Newspaper Lover Dave Eggers Coy About Newspapering PastSan Franciso Weekly

Eggers in the Onion; Weekly not Laughing –BayNewser

Previously: McSweeney’s Launches Print Project, Panorama

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career! Starting December 1, you'll hear from our expert speakers on the best practices for launching a freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now!

Crowdsourcing In 2010: Will We Keep Supplying The Media Free Content?

crowdsourcing-cartoon.jpgMediaPost‘s Maryanne Conlin wrote a post today about crowdsourcing, a technique employed by corporations that costs them less than it would to hire outside consultants. By calling on a green blog/mom community to help develop a non-profit project, Conlin claims “When they get passionate about something, they can compete with the best of social media marketers by creating and executing strategies that work to advance their wants and needs.”

But is it ethical?

Read more

NPR Creates New Senior Management Role Focused On Diversity

Keith Woods.jpgNational Public Radio is increasing its focus on diversity with the addition of a new senior manager role.

Keith Woods, the dean of faculty at the Poynter Institute, has been named as the first vice president in charge of Diversity in News and Operations for the nonprofit organization. In his new role, Woods, a former consultant to NPR, will “lead the development of NPR’s vision and strategy for diversity, and will play a central role in its implementation across the NPR newsroom, throughout the organization and in the public radio community as a whole,” NPR said. He will join NPR full-time in February.

Woods, a journalism veteran who has served on two Pulitzer Prize juries, will work with NPR’s CEO Vivian Schiller to help broaden the radio network’s content in order to reach a more diverse audience. He will also provide coaching and training throughout the organization and its member stations to help deal with issues of “content, recruiting and workplace environment strategies,” the company said.

Full release after the jump

NPR’s Schiller: “Our Plans For Going Forward Is More”

(Photo by Kenny Irby)

Read more

Reuters Hosts Panel On “Shaky” Audience-Media Relationships

IMG_0763.JPG

Last night at the Thomson Reuters building in Times Square, Jack Shafer of Slate.com moderated a panel for millennium journalism entitled “Audience and the Media: A Shaky Marriage.”

The speakers at the event each came from a mainstream news outlet, with differing ideas on how to keep credibility and objectivity in their field while maintaining their audiences’ interests.

Michael Oreskes, editor of The Associated Press, came out swinging. “We’re in an era of mistrust…[the mainstream media] have done a truly lousy job [explaining] why we mattered,” he said. “We got away with it for a long time until the Internet. Suddenly why we failed to explain who we were really mattered.”

Lisa Shepard, ombudsman of National Public Radio, shared a similar sentiment, “The public does depend on the media, and loves to kick us,” she said, explaining that news organizations have been “horrible at marketing themselves” as credible resources, even as they have become more transparent and willing to admit their mistakes.

“Lets be realistic,” Shepard told the crowd. “When you are putting out a 24-hour news product, you are going to have mistakes every day.”

But does admitting those mistakes and issuing corrections make a publication seem more credible, or less? Read on for more from last night’s panel.

Read more

Rather’s CBS Suit Dismissed|Gannett Says Thirds Q Results Will Surpass Expectations|Advanstar Restructures|NPR CEO Vivian Schiller

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy

TVNewser: Dan Rather‘s $70 million lawsuit against former employer CBS Corp. has been dismissed. And in other CBS news, check out this profile of “60 Minutes” correspondent Byron Pitts, who reveals he was functionally illiterate until he was 12.

Associated Press: Gannett‘s shares jumped 18 percent in premarket trading today after the media company announced that its third quarter earnings were likely to surpass expectations. Gannett will publish its earnings October 19.

Folio: Advanstar Communications announced a restructuring, cutting its debts by $385 million.

More: A profile of Vivian Schiller, president and CEO of National Public Radio. “We have a lot of women in senior leadership,” Schiller said of NPR. “I was the first female CEO. But our head of news is a woman, our general counsel is a woman, our new senior vice president of administration and finance is a woman, our head of communication is a woman. The spirit of Cokie [Roberts] and Linda [Wertheimer] and Nina [Totenberg] and Susan [Stamberg[ very much pervades it.”