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Posts Tagged ‘New York Sun’

Happy National Newspaper Carrier Day!

On September 4, 1833, the New York Sun anointed Irish-born Barney Flaherty into a then-very promising profession. The ten-year-old was the nation’s first paperboy and in his honor each year since, the fourth of September is marked by some as National Newspaper Carrier Day.

NAALogoNot too many papers today are celebrating the occasion. In fact, over at USA Today, the “Extra! Extra! Read All About It!” cries have everything to do with the twilight era of a paperboy and papergirl’s business. Nevertheless, Christian Science Monitor reporter Lisa Suhay has some fascinating info on how the profession stacks up, 181 years later:

Today, according to John Murray, vice president of Audience Development at the Newspaper Association of America (NAA), nearly 80 percent of carriers are adults, and even though subscribers are now billed directly by the newspapers, 95 percent of all carriers are still independent contractors just like the original paper boys.

The main reason the job has transitioned mostly to adults is due to the evolution of newspapers, both in overall size (including more circulars), and broader distribution. Often distribution hubs are located far from most carriers’ homes and daily deliveries include burgeoning routes with as many as seven different newspaper titles being delivered by a single carrier, which make it too difficult for a child on a bike to manage, according to Murray…

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Mediabistro Course

Children's Picture Book Writing

Children's Picture Book WritingStarting September 15, this part lecture, part workshop course will take you through the process of outlining, writing, editing, and submitting a children's picture book. Taught by a published children's book author, Dashka Slater will teach you how to write in pictures, hook readers and editors with your story, apply the nuts and bolts of marketing, and more. Register now! 

WSJ‘s Local NY Looks Bigger Than Expected

3008.jpgWhen a media company starts hiring, it makes news. And when that company is hiring more people than expected it’s a cause for celebration.

This fall, we were excited to learn that The Wall Street Journal was seeking to hire about a dozen local New York reporters to cover everything from city and state government to the arts for a new section in the paper set to compete directly against The New York Times.

But the hiring news now is getting even better (although the Times might disagree). Today, The New York Observer reports that the Journal‘s New York bureau will actually include three times as many staffers as originally expected — including a number of former New York Sun writers and editors, like John Seeley, the former managing editor of the Sun, who has been picked to lead the new bureau. Other reported hires include former Sun staffers Jacob Gershman, Kate Taylor, Erica Orden and Ryan Sager, and Michael Saul from The New York Daily News.

It’s no secret that Rupert Murdoch, CEO of Journal owner News Corp., has no love lost for the Times, and this new venture is seen among New York media circles as a direct assault against the Gray Lady’s dominance in the local media space, especially in arts coverage. We’re waiting patiently until April to see what this new launch will bring — and whether another feud between the Journal and the Times will crop up before then.

Read more: Rupert vs. the WorldThe Observer

Previously: Times-Journal Feud Update, Wall Street Journal Looks To Hire Local NY Reporters

More Thoughts On Condé Nast

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It’s only natural that, in the days following the announcement of four magazine closures at Condé Nast, everyone around the industry would have something to say. (We also had our own thoughts on getting laid off.)

Last night, at the mediabistro.com cocktail party we hosted, the Condé closings were on everyone’s mind. We were asked, why didn’t the company look to sell longstanding epicurean title Gourmet instead of shuttering it? Our party guests weren’t the only ones wondering this. Former New York Sun managing editor Ira Stoll blogged about this very topic on The Future of Capitalism blog, focusing on the antitrust angle of a company closing one title but keeping another in the same category going.

Here are some other things that people are talking about:

- The New York Observer looked at how Condé Nast can look towards a future in digital — especially in their epicurean and bridal areas. “One source from Condé Nast Digital told The Observer that [Gourmet's] Web projects may be folded into BonAppetit.com, the site of Condé Nast’s other magazine about food and cooking, but those plans could not be confirmed.”

- The New York Post reports that “at least three Condé Nast titles are said to be considering frequency chops as a way to shave budgets” by the approximately 25 percent mandated by company execs. Those said to be mulling cutting their frequencies include Allure, W and Lucky.

- Gourmet editor Ruth Reichl called The New York TimesKim Severson, “sounding tired and reflective and sad.” Reichl revealed that she is working on new book that will focus on “the Condé Nast years.” She will also continue to travel to support the new cookbook Gourmet Today and will debut the public television show “Gourmet’s Adventures With Ruth” later this month.

And check out Jon Stewart‘s solution to Condé Nast’s problems in the clip above, Pregnant Gourmet Bride magazine.

Related: Confessions Of A Condé Nast Layoff Victim

‘Midas Watch’ Columnist Thomas Leaves Observer, Says Kushner is One of ‘The Bad Guys’

thomas.JPGMichael M. Thomas, New York Observer columnist, Forbes.com and Daily Beast contributor and author of several books including the recently published “Love & Money,” has decided to leave the salmon-colored paper after 22 years.

Thomas, a recent Morning Media Menu podcast guest, wrote about his decision to leave the Observer on his personal blog Midas Watch (which has the same name as his Observer column) on Sunday, and sent a letter out to friends.

“It looks as if the NY Observer and I are parting company for good,” he said. “The new owner stands pretty much squarely on the side of those whom I consider the bad guys in the great civic and financial equations that govern our parlous existence. That his prospective father-in-law is Donald Trump, a person known to earlier readers of the NYO ‘Midas Watch’ as ‘the Prince of Swine,’ only adds to the confusion.”

Thomas said he’ll stick to blogging, about “books, food, the media, golf, music, Wall Street, manners, the writer’s trade, Brooklyn, local politics, the Hamptons,” and anything else that interests him.

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Journal Looks To Develop New York-Centric Culture Pages

wsj2.pngSince snatching up The Wall Street Journal last year, Rupert Murdoch has made a few changes — in an attempt to expand the business paper into a more general interest read.

Now, The Observer‘s John Koblin reports that the Journal is working to develop a culture and arts section that will focus on New York City. Koblin points out that this new section might be Murdoch’s attempt to snag readers from “a familiar foe,” The New York Times, but others said that is ripe for coverage.

“The Times has gone wrong by covering arts nationally and casting the net so wide that they aren’t focused on New York anymore,” said Pia Catton, the former culture editor of the now defunct New York Sun who now works for Politico.com.