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Posts Tagged ‘new yorker’

The Luxury Approach to Newspapers Appears to be Working

WSJSubscriptionPromoIn a December 2012 essay, New Yorker staff writer John Cassidy noted how both the Wall Street Journal and New York Times seemed headed in an elitist digital subscriber direction. This afternoon, he’s back on the same general topic and guess what? It amounts to a “Bit of Good News About Journalism.”

Cassidy reminds that full annual digital subscriptions to these newspapers (once initial promotional rates end) are pricey: $348 for the Wall Street Journal, $455 for the New York Times and $467 for the Financial Times. But for dailies lucky enough to have the right median-income reader and workplace subscriptions base, it seems to be working:

At the Financial Times, the bulk of the company’s revenues now come from digital subscriptions, and the newspaper has been profitable for quite a while. [Spokesperson Rachel] Taub also told me that profits grew in the first half of 2014, driven by a rise in digital revenues. A spokesperson for the Journal wouldn’t comment on its finances, but earlier this month, the newspaper’s corporate sibling, Times Newspapers of the United Kingdom, which publishes the Times and the Sunday Times, recorded its first operating profit in thirteen years. That’s particularly notable because Times Newspapers was one of the first UK publishers to ditch the free-content model. Five years ago, it was losing more than a hundred million dollars a year.

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New Yorker Cartoonist Wishes He Could Redraw That David Lynch One

The interview was done some time ago; the illustration, many years before that. Still, we thought it was worth pointing you to this week’s share by British GQ of a conversation between editor Andy Morris and Brooklyn-based New Yorker cartoonist Adrian Tomine.

AdrianTomineMulhollandDrive

There’s some funny stuff from Tomine about the personal challenges of attending New Yorker office parties. The cartoonist also admitted that not being able to always to see the cultural artifacts he comments on can have its drawbacks:

“I’m a huge fan of Mulholland Drive, and I think if I’d had a chance to see the film before doing the illustration, I would’ve drawn something different. I’ve been surprised when some of the people I drew have contacted me about purchasing the artwork.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Inquirer Editor Sacked | Fox Newsroom Revamped | Shainin to New Yorker


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Top Editor at The Philadelphia Inquirer Is Dismissed (NYT)
In the latest example of management turmoil at The Philadelphia Inquirer, William K. Marimow was fired as the paper’s top editor on Monday. The news was announced in a brief email sent to staff members in the morning by the newspaper’s publisher, Robert J. Hall. Poynter / MediaWire Marimow and publisher Bob Hall had a “difference in philosophical vision in the direction of the paper,” a source says. The newsroom was scheduled to learn of Marimow’s departure Monday afternoon, the source said. There’s no timetable yet for his departure. JimRomenesko.com “Total surprise,” I’m told. “He was at the 10:30 morning news meeting, so it had to be sudden as the wording of the email indicates. Word has it all the owners were not consulted and that Marimow has told some folks ‘it’s not over yet.’” NewsWorks Newspaper sources told me that Hall recently instructed Marimow to fire at least two veteran staff members at the newspaper, and that he refused on principle, precipitating his own dismissal. He said the decision to oust Marimow came after weeks of talks about the nature and pace of changes needed at the newspaper. He said the changes were based on “reader research” but that he wouldn’t get into specifics, in part for competitive reasons. Philadelphia Magazine Marimow was fired after many months of infighting with Hall, according to internal documents anonymously delivered Monday afternoon to Philadelphia magazine. “Marimow is not and never will be the change agent that we need at the Inquirer to turn around the circulation decline and grow our company,” writes Hall, in summation.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ‘Weekend Update’ Update | NPR Cuts Staff | New Yorker Gets Makeover


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Cecily Strong Poised to Take Over SNL‘s ‘Weekend Update’ (NY Mag / Vulture)
With SNL head writer Seth Meyers heading for Jimmy Fallon’s job in February, SNL‘s “Weekend Update” is missing its host. That gig is going to Cecily Strong, who joined the show last season and perhaps joined your life as the Girl You Wish You Hadn’t Started a Conversation With at a Party. Strong will join Meyers on the desk during the Sept. 28 season premiere. NYT Lorne Michaels said his general plan was to have Strong share the “Update” desk with Meyers for the season’s initial shows and then segue into a solo role later, maybe in the first season — but maybe not. If possible, Michaels would like to see Meyers stay on “Weekend Update” even after he moves to Late Night, starting on Feb. 24. USA Today Meyers tweeted congrats to his new co-anchor Sunday night, saying he was “very excited,” adding, “As for The Girl You Wish You Hadn’t Started a Conversation With, it’s prob safe to assume that she died somewhere, mid-conversation.” Variety News of Strong’s move caps one of the busiest off-seasons ever for Michaels’ 39-year-old sketch comedy series. SNL cast members Bill Hader, Jason Sudeikis and Fred Armisen left the series in May, making room for newcomers Beck Bennett, John Milhiser, Noël Wells, Kyle Mooney and Brooks Wheelan, all of whom will join the cast this season.

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Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

  1. Horrible, Terrible, Bad Celtic Rajon Rondo Joins GQ as Intern, September 7
  2. O Magazine Announces Three New Hires, September 11
  3. Cover Battle: Architectural Digest or Time Style and Design, September 6
  4. New York Times Makes Right Call With No Front Page Coverage of 9/11, September 11
  5. Time Adds Social Media Editor, September 12
  6. Cover Battle: Rolling Stone or New York, September 13
  7. Nipples on New Yorker Cartoon Prompt a Facebook Ban, September 11

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Time Magazine ‘Satisfied’ That Fareed Zakaria Plagiarizing Was ‘Isolated Incident’

Fareed Zakaria is staying out of trouble with on Time magazine. Zakaria received ridicule for plagiarizing a New Yorker article in his latest Time column.

But a Time spokesperson says in a statement that the Zakaria matter is over.

“We have completed a thorough review of each of Fareed Zakaria’s columns for Time, and we are entirely satisfied that the language in question in his recent column was an unintentional error and an isolated incident for which he has apologized. We look forward to having Fareed’s thoughtful and important voice back in the magazine with his next column in the issue that comes out on September 7.”

Zakaria also hosts a weekly show on CNN.

Photo: CNN.com

Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

  1. News Gone from WEMP, Alternative Music Returns, July 17
  2. WEMP Begins Phase as New Rock 101.9, July 18
  3. Breaking: End of Line for Merlin’s WEMP as FM News, July 16
  4. Breaking: WNYW Brass Meet for Greg Kelly Damage Control, July 19
  5. USA Today and MLB Launch ‘Sports on Earth,’ July 17
  6. New Yorker Caption Contest Features Cartoon from Seinfeld, July 18

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

  1. Writer Quits XOJane to Do More Drugs, June 14
  2. Anna Wintour Admits Glorifying Mass Murderers Isn’t a Good Idea, June 11
  3. Patch Sets Records for Revenue and Traffic, June 11
  4. New Yorker Cover Pokes Fun at Bloomberg Soda Ban (left), June 13
  5. WNYW Airs Tweet From Newark Mayor Cory Booker About Relationship with President Obama, June 8
  6. Warner Fusselle, Brooklyn Cyclones, Veteran Baseball Announcer, Dies at 68
  7. Veteran WINS Reporter Terry Sheridan Jumps Ship to WEMP, June 10

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Two More Awards for New Yorker Freelance Writer Sarah Stillman

Sarah Stillman is a New York-based journalist. She has written about Iraq and Afghanistan for several publications or online sites, including Slate, The Washington Post, the Nation and the Dallas Morning News.

Stillman, the inaugural winner of the New York University Carter Journalism Institute’s Reporting Award, has added two trophies to her mantle. Her piece in the June 6, 2011 issue of the New Yorker was entitled “Invisible Army.”  She documents poor treatment of Third-World nationals working on U.S. military bases in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“Sarah’s compelling story is a perfect representation of the work we’re trying to encourage at a time of cutbacks in editorial budgets,” said Stephen Solomon, associate director of the Institute.

The Reporting Award, in its second year, funds articles on under-reported subjects in the public interest.

Stillman was decorated with the Hillman Prize for Magazine Journalism and National Magazine Award in the category of public interest.

Jason Schwartzman Shows Us How to Use The New Yorker iPad App

John Biggs at TechCrunch analyzes why the New Yorker app is far superior to the magazine, and why this is officially the death of print:

The iPad version includes everything that currently exists in the print title… except in a much cleaner form. Each issue costs $4.99 and e-only subscriptions cost $59 a year. iPad and print subscriptions cost $69.

There are no graphical tricks, not too many multimedia events, and when there are, they’re great (one poetry reading by Sherman Alexie in the latest issue was amazing). And even the ads are unobtrusive and, dare I say it, beautiful in full living color… This is a full rethinking of the title and changes entirely how we consume long-form writing.

But nothing will convince you of how cool the New Yorker app is quite like having it sold to you by Jason Schwartzman, hipster rockstar:

You’re welcome.

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