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Posts Tagged ‘newspapers’

Newspapers are Really Excited About 2016 Election

Editors at America’s top 15 newspapers are losing their minds with excitement about the 2016 presidential election. According to a new Pew study, in the first nine months of the year there have been 541 articles written about the election. That’s already double the amount of articles that were written about the 2012 presidential election during the same period in 2010.

Unsurprisingly, the two people who get covered the most are Chris Christie and Hillary Clinton. Newspapers surveyed by Pew have already featured 82 articles each about the potential candidates. Keep in mind that neither has officially said they will run. Just imagine what will happen when (not if!) they do.

It’s only 2014, but there is no escape. You must read about the 2016 election. You must read about the 2016 election. YOU MUST READ ABOUT THE 2016 ELECTION.

[Image: Fotostory/Shutterstock.com]

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Newspaper Reporter Listed as ‘Endangered Job’


Newspaper reporter — along with meter reader, travel agent, lumberjack (sorry Dexter!), flight attendant and more — has been named one of the most endangered jobs of 2014. Even the Dodo went out more gracefully than this.

According to CareerCast, there’s pretty much no hope for the newspaper reporter:

Declining subscription and dwindling advertising sales have negatively impacted the hiring power of some newspapers, while others have ceased operations altogether. Online outlets continue to replace traditional newspapers, and the long-term outlook for newspaper reporters reflects the change.

Well, that’s certainly depressing. Accurate, but depressing.

[Image: Shutterstock]

Number of Minorities Employed by Newspapers Remains Static

Lost amid the drama surrounding The New York Times firing Jill Abramson is the hiring of Dean Baquet. Baquet is important not only because he’s the Times’ first black executive editor, but as the Pew Research Center notes, his accession highlights the lack of minorities employed by newspapers.

Over the last 18 years, the number of minority staffers and supervisors at newspapers has remained essentially static, accounting for one out of every 10 positions. In 1994, minorities accounted for about 11 percent of newspapers’ workforce. In 2012, that number had barely budged to 12 percent.

While things are better for minorities when it comes to local TV news, it’s not by much. In 2004, minorities accounted for 21 percent of the local TV news workforce. In 2012, the percentage was unchanged.

[Image: Pew Research Center]

The Many Newspapers of New York

Screen Shot 2013-10-11 at 9.34.26 AMWe had no idea, but apparently this is National Newspaper Week. Hey, at least we figured it out before it was over. The New York Times did it right, and celebrated the week by posting photos of eight newspapers that were once part of our city’s daily life.

What were the newspapers of the past? There was the Daily Mirror, The New York Journal, The Evening Telegram, The Commercial Advertiser, The Graphic and much more. In 1900, there were 15 daily newspapers published in New York City; in 1940, there were still 10 being printed. That’s insane.

Things have obviously changed a lot since then — CHiPs came and went, the Internet was invented, etc. — but New Yorkers still love their papers. We have four newspapers in the top 25 papers ranked by circulation, that’s more than any other city in the nation.

Traditional Media Downfall Shown in Depressing Infographic

On the heels of Pew’s findings that newspapers gain only $1 in digital revenue for every $7 lost in print revenue, we now present to you even more depressing news. The Next Web has found perhaps the saddest traditional media related infographic ever.

A few lowlights:

  • Between 2007 and 2010, 13,500 journalists have lost their jobs
  • Amazon sells about 115 e-books for every 100 print books
  • Just 31 percent of people who read a paper each day read it in print only
  • Ful-time newspaper staff is at its lowest point since the 1970s

To view the full infographic, click here. If you’re in the traditional media business, you might not want to. If you do look at it, maybe have a loved one hold your hand while you do. It’s that bad.

Amazing Graph Shows Growth of Newspapers

This map, which documents the growth of newspapers across the nation, shows that in 1725, The New-York Gazette became Gotham’s first newspaper. As you can imagine, it wasn’t that great.

The Gazette was a “small two-page paper, poorly printed, and containing chiefly foreign news from three to six months old, state papers, lists of ships entered and cleared, and a few advertisements,” said Frank Luther Mott in his book, American Journalism, A History: 1690-1960.

While we’re sure the ads were probably hilarious (the finest ‘coon skin caps this side of the woods!) we have to appreciate the pioneering efforts of the media companies of old.

In order to do that, we suggest you click through to Stanford’s website, and play with the interactive map yourself. You can slide the date and watch as dots document papers springing up.

While 1725 didn’t have much going on, check out our region in 1925:

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FishbowlNY Newsstand: Your Morning at a Glance

Tim Pawlenty’s Local Newspaper Puts His 2012 Announcement on Obituary Page

City Pages reports that Tim Pawlenty‘s very own hometown newspaper, the St. Paul Pioneer Press, ran the announcement of his presidential campaign on the Obituary page this morning. Are they calling their own man Dead on Arrival?

Amused though we are by this, we’re warned not to read too much into it. “Any other day, it would have made the front page. But that’s what he gets for making his big publicity push the day after a deadly tornado rips through his home state.”

Google Abandons Plan to Archive the World’s Newspapers

This could have been amazing: Google has had a five-year-old News Archive project that was basically its newspaper version of Google Books. As part of the project, Google promised to scan, index, and host digital files from numerous newspapers, and it eventually had 60 million pages, covering 250 years.

But alas, no more. Google sent an email to publishers, including The Boston Phoenix, saying it would cease accepting, scanning, and indexing microfilm and other archival material from newspapers. This is what the Phoenix‘s blog had to say on the subject:

News Archive was generally a good deal for newspapers — especially smaller ones like ours, who couldn’t afford the tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars it would have cost to digitally scan and index our archives… but newspapers are infamously more difficult to index than books, thanks to layout complexities such as columns and jumps, which require humans or intense algorithmic juju to decode. Here’s two wild guesses: the process may have turned out to be harder than Google anticipated. Or it may have turned out that the resulting pages drew far fewer eyeballs than anyone expected.

RIP, Google News Archive. We hardly knew you.

Newspaper Apologizes for “Hottest Sex Offender” List

Today in offputting, we hear from Poynter that Houston Press, a Village Voice affiliate, wrote a post called “10 Hottest Women on the Texas Sex Offenders List.”

Funny stuff. Note that women on the list have assaulted boys and girls ranging from two to 16 years old.

The writer of the piece, editor Richard Connelly, was, obviously, taken to task in the comments under the post, such as this one: “There is nothing about child molestation that should be glorified. I cannot believe this got published and everyone involved should be fired.”

Now he has issued an apology, and explained the genesis of this post:

Last week I spoke to two veteran child-porn prosecutors… It triggered an idea about how people have a pre-conceived notion of what dangerous predators “always” look like — slovenly fat guys in t-shirts asking kids if they wanted a ride — and how best to shake that notion up.

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