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Posts Tagged ‘Newsweek’

Morning Media Newsfeed: IBT Muzzling Speech? | Emmy Ratings Soar | LinkedIn Sued


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Newsweek’s New Owner Accused of ‘Illegally Muzzling’ Employees (Adweek)
IBT Media’s purchase of Newsweek seems to be off to an inauspicious start. The Newspaper Guild has accused the digital publishing company of “illegally muzzling” its employees by “prohibiting its journalists and other employees from discussing their working conditions or criticizing their employer,” in violation of U.S. labor law. The guild, which represents editorial employees at Newsweek and its former online counterpart The Daily Beast, said it filed an unfair labor practice charge Sept. 18. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media According to “The International Business Times Employee Handbook,” a copy of which was obtained by Politico, employees are prohibited from speaking negatively about their employer — a rule that the New York Newspaper Guild calls a violation of U.S. labor law. Per the handbook, each IBT staff member “has the responsibility of encouraging favorable public opinion to benefit the organization… Anything that reflects negatively on IBTimes will affect public opinion of our business.” FishbowlNY “The law gives all employees the right to discuss their pay and other terms of employment with one another, even if it means being critical of their employers,” said the Newspaper Guild’s president, Bill O’Meara, in a statement. “It’s especially disturbing that the owner of a news organization doesn’t seem to understand that.” Capital New York O’Meara told Capital that the benefits packages being offered to the transitioning Newsweek employees would require them to pay 100 percent of the premium for health insurance. “We are constantly working on improving benefits while making sure we make financially sound decisions,” an IBT spokeswoman countered.

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New Newsweek Owner Won’t Let Staffers Talk About Newsweek [Update]

IBT Media logo GApparently the first rule of IBT Media — the new owner of Newsweek — is you don’t talk about IBT Media. For that policy, the company has drawn the attention of The Newspaper Guild of New York. The Guild has formerly accused IBT Media of not allowing its journalists to discuss their working conditions or criticizing the company, which is a violation of the National Labor Relations Act.

“The law gives all employees the right to discuss their pay and other terms of employment with one another, even if it means being critical of their employers,” said the Guild’s president, Bill O’Meara, in a statement. “It’s especially disturbing that the owner of a news organization doesn’t seem to understand that.”

Yes, yes it is. The National Labor Relations Board will now investigate the Guild’s claims. If the NLRB considers the case worthwhile, it’ll file a complaint. If a settlement isn’t reached, there would be a hearing by an administrative law judge.

Update (8:09 pm):
IBT Media issued the following statement:

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TIME Appoints First Female Managing Editor

By sheer coincidence, the once iconic newsstand combo of TIME and Newsweek have both this month anointed new senior editorial staff.

Last week, IBT Media announced that Jim Impoco was being handed the reins of Newsweek. Today, Time Inc. EIC Martha Nelson made it official by sharing the news that Nancy Gibbs has been promoted to replace the departed Rick Stengel as managing editor:

I cannot think of a more perfect person than Nancy to lead TIME. She has done an outstanding job running TIME since July, when I asked Rick to assist me with corporate matters related to our upcoming spin off. Her cover stories in the past weeks on Syria, collegiate sports and child-free couples have been huge successes with readers and in the media, and, in the same period, she launched TIME’s Martin Luther King Jr. anniversary special issue in tandem with a new documentary film unit, Red Border Films, that is expanding the way TIME tells stories through video online…

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Jim Impoco Named Editor-in-Chief of Newsweek

IBT Media, the relatively new owner of Newsweek, has named Jim Impoco the news publication’s new editor-in-chief. Impoco tweeted early this morning that he was “incredibly thrilled and honored” to take the job.

Impoco comes to Newsweek from Reuters, where he served as enterprise editor and executive editor of Thomson Reuters Digital. Prior to his time at Reuters, Impoco worked for Condé Nast Portfolio, The New York Times, Fortune and U.S. News & World Report.

“Jim has a remarkable track record of leadership in journalism and a deep understanding of the digital industry, which is the exactly what will take Newsweek to the next level. We look forward to his many contributions as editor-in-chief,” said Etienne Uzac, co-founder and CEO of IBT Media, in a statement.

Variety Grabs Newsweek/Daily Beast Vet

Ramin Setoodeh, who spent a combined 11 years at Newsweek and The Daily Beast, has moved over to the Hollywood trade side. As Variety‘s New York film editor, he will be based here alongside a small but growing staff.

From this morning’s announcement:

Setoodeh will also produce videos, webcasts and make regular television appearances on news shows to talk about the film industry. He reports to Claudia Eller, editor-in-chief, film…

A fearless and industrious journalist, Setoodeh once went undercover and auditioned for American Idol, and launched several Web series — one featuring Channing Tatum and Chris Evans candidly discussing their early acting jobs. His 2010 theater review of Sean Hayes in Promises Promises went viral, sparking a major debate about gay actors in Hollywood and eliciting responses from such high-profile players as Ryan Murphy, Aaron Sorkin and Kristin Chenoweth.

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Daily Beast to Lose $12 Million This Year

Now that IAC has sold off Newsweek, what does the future hold for The Daily Beast and Tina Brown? The Daily Beast might one day disappear because — according to Adweek — it’s currently on pace to lose $12 million this year. That’s not likely to inspire much confidence in Barry Diller, who famously called buying Newsweek “a mistake.

As for Brown, Adweek guesses she’ll either stay at The Daily Beast, shift her focus to the Women in The World Summit, or maybe take some time off to finish her book on Hillary Clinton. In other words, no one has any idea what the hell Brown will do next.

At least Brown still has some support. David Remnick, The New Yorker’s editor-in-chief, told Adweek that he is “always rooting for her.”

It’s Not Tina Brown’s Fault That Newsweek Failed

Now that Newsweek has been sold yet again, it’s time to examine who is at fault for its downfall. The popular target is Tina Brown. She certainly receives the brunt of a New York Times piece, which features interviews with Newsweek staffers who claim that Brown’s style destroyed the magazine. And while that’s true, Brown is not solely to blame.

Brown is famous for being irrational and chaotic. As the Times notes, she sent staffers to Paris despite there being no promise of a story. She once asked Dirk Barnett, Newsweek’s former creative director, to design 82 covers in just seven days. When she did approve covers, they were often ridiculous. Brown even claimed that she knew about Breaking Bad before anyone else at Newsweek, which sort of shows how kooky she can be.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: CBS Blackout Drags On | Newsweek Sold to IBT | Red Sox Owner Buys Globe


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No Sign of Progress in CBS/Time Warner Cable Dispute (WSJ)
A blackout of CBS Corp.’s flagship network on Time Warner Cable Inc. systems in New York, Los Angeles and a few other markets dragged on through the weekend with no sign of any resolution. By Sunday afternoon the two companies couldn’t even agree on whether any talks were under way. A Time Warner Cable spokeswoman said negotiations were “ongoing,” while CBS said that “there are no negotiations taking place at this time.” TVNewser At 5 p.m. ET Friday CBS O&Os in New York, Los Angeles, Dallas, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Denver and Pittsburgh were pulled from Time Warner Cable systems in those markets. Additionally, cable channels Showtime, The Movie Channel, Flix and Smithsonian Channel are blacked out on Time Warner Cable. NYT “There are several ways that you can still see your favorite shows, including using an antenna to get CBS free over the air.” An antenna? Where does that go, on top of the cathode-ray tube? That’s one of the tips Time Warner Cable put up on screen after it stopped showing CBS around the country on Friday. NYT The continuing impasse resulted in two popular shows on the pay cable channel Showtime, Dexter and Ray Donovan, being unavailable to fans in those areas on Sunday night. And it means that the most popular drama of the summer, CBS’ Under the Dome, is likely to be blocked to millions of viewers on Monday night. Several media analysts suggested the standoff might be protracted, with predictions ranging from about 10 days to as long as six weeks. The later date is associated with the start of the NFL season, a package of programming that everyone involved agrees cannot be denied to subscribers. Indeed, timing seems to be the dominant factor driving the dispute. Time In a tit-for-tat action, CBS responded by blocking videos of full episodes of its programming on CBS.com for Time Warner Cable broadband customers in the affected markets.

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Newsweek Sold to IBT Media

IBT Media, publishers of the International Business Times, are your new Newsweek owners. IBT is a digital-only company, so Newsweek will continue as it has since the print edition was folded. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

In 2010, Sidney Harman purchased Newsweek from The Washington Post Company. Harman then entered into a partnership with Barry Diller and IAC. Tina Brown — editor of Newsweek and The Daily Beast — tried her best, but aside from generating some catchy/creepy covers, Newsweek continued to flounder. After the magazine was folded, Diller even admitted that being involved with Newsweek was a mistake.

IAC will operate Newsweek for the next 60 days, after that, it’s all IBT Media’s. For better or worse.

Author Googles His Way to Tragic Tale of Wrongfully Executed Elephant

Ahead of journalist Michael Daly‘s 7 p.m. book reading and signing event tomorrow night at Brooklyn Heights Montessori School, Samantha Samel of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle caught up with the author of Topsy: The Startling Story of the Crooked-Tailed Elephant, P. T. Barnum, and the American Wizard, Thomas Edison.

Published July 2 by Atlantic Monthly Press, the book offers a thoroughly researched look at the early days of U.S. circuses and the sad, symptomatic storyline of Topsy. Smuggled into the U.S. in 1877, the performing elephant ultimately met with a tragic, cruel end. Daly explains how he came to the topic:

“My editor suggested doing a murder case from earlier times. I Googled New York executions and came across the clip of Topsy being electrocuted in 1903.”

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