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Posts Tagged ‘Newsweek’

Jim Impoco Named Editor-in-Chief of Newsweek

IBT Media, the relatively new owner of Newsweek, has named Jim Impoco the news publication’s new editor-in-chief. Impoco tweeted early this morning that he was “incredibly thrilled and honored” to take the job.

Impoco comes to Newsweek from Reuters, where he served as enterprise editor and executive editor of Thomson Reuters Digital. Prior to his time at Reuters, Impoco worked for Condé Nast Portfolio, The New York Times, Fortune and U.S. News & World Report.

“Jim has a remarkable track record of leadership in journalism and a deep understanding of the digital industry, which is the exactly what will take Newsweek to the next level. We look forward to his many contributions as editor-in-chief,” said Etienne Uzac, co-founder and CEO of IBT Media, in a statement.

Variety Grabs Newsweek/Daily Beast Vet

Ramin Setoodeh, who spent a combined 11 years at Newsweek and The Daily Beast, has moved over to the Hollywood trade side. As Variety‘s New York film editor, he will be based here alongside a small but growing staff.

From this morning’s announcement:

Setoodeh will also produce videos, webcasts and make regular television appearances on news shows to talk about the film industry. He reports to Claudia Eller, editor-in-chief, film…

A fearless and industrious journalist, Setoodeh once went undercover and auditioned for American Idol, and launched several Web series — one featuring Channing Tatum and Chris Evans candidly discussing their early acting jobs. His 2010 theater review of Sean Hayes in Promises Promises went viral, sparking a major debate about gay actors in Hollywood and eliciting responses from such high-profile players as Ryan Murphy, Aaron Sorkin and Kristin Chenoweth.

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Daily Beast to Lose $12 Million This Year

Now that IAC has sold off Newsweek, what does the future hold for The Daily Beast and Tina Brown? The Daily Beast might one day disappear because — according to Adweek — it’s currently on pace to lose $12 million this year. That’s not likely to inspire much confidence in Barry Diller, who famously called buying Newsweek “a mistake.

As for Brown, Adweek guesses she’ll either stay at The Daily Beast, shift her focus to the Women in The World Summit, or maybe take some time off to finish her book on Hillary Clinton. In other words, no one has any idea what the hell Brown will do next.

At least Brown still has some support. David Remnick, The New Yorker’s editor-in-chief, told Adweek that he is “always rooting for her.”

It’s Not Tina Brown’s Fault That Newsweek Failed

Now that Newsweek has been sold yet again, it’s time to examine who is at fault for its downfall. The popular target is Tina Brown. She certainly receives the brunt of a New York Times piece, which features interviews with Newsweek staffers who claim that Brown’s style destroyed the magazine. And while that’s true, Brown is not solely to blame.

Brown is famous for being irrational and chaotic. As the Times notes, she sent staffers to Paris despite there being no promise of a story. She once asked Dirk Barnett, Newsweek’s former creative director, to design 82 covers in just seven days. When she did approve covers, they were often ridiculous. Brown even claimed that she knew about Breaking Bad before anyone else at Newsweek, which sort of shows how kooky she can be.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: CBS Blackout Drags On | Newsweek Sold to IBT | Red Sox Owner Buys Globe


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No Sign of Progress in CBS/Time Warner Cable Dispute (WSJ)
A blackout of CBS Corp.’s flagship network on Time Warner Cable Inc. systems in New York, Los Angeles and a few other markets dragged on through the weekend with no sign of any resolution. By Sunday afternoon the two companies couldn’t even agree on whether any talks were under way. A Time Warner Cable spokeswoman said negotiations were “ongoing,” while CBS said that “there are no negotiations taking place at this time.” TVNewser At 5 p.m. ET Friday CBS O&Os in New York, Los Angeles, Dallas, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Denver and Pittsburgh were pulled from Time Warner Cable systems in those markets. Additionally, cable channels Showtime, The Movie Channel, Flix and Smithsonian Channel are blacked out on Time Warner Cable. NYT “There are several ways that you can still see your favorite shows, including using an antenna to get CBS free over the air.” An antenna? Where does that go, on top of the cathode-ray tube? That’s one of the tips Time Warner Cable put up on screen after it stopped showing CBS around the country on Friday. NYT The continuing impasse resulted in two popular shows on the pay cable channel Showtime, Dexter and Ray Donovan, being unavailable to fans in those areas on Sunday night. And it means that the most popular drama of the summer, CBS’ Under the Dome, is likely to be blocked to millions of viewers on Monday night. Several media analysts suggested the standoff might be protracted, with predictions ranging from about 10 days to as long as six weeks. The later date is associated with the start of the NFL season, a package of programming that everyone involved agrees cannot be denied to subscribers. Indeed, timing seems to be the dominant factor driving the dispute. Time In a tit-for-tat action, CBS responded by blocking videos of full episodes of its programming on CBS.com for Time Warner Cable broadband customers in the affected markets.

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Newsweek Sold to IBT Media

IBT Media, publishers of the International Business Times, are your new Newsweek owners. IBT is a digital-only company, so Newsweek will continue as it has since the print edition was folded. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

In 2010, Sidney Harman purchased Newsweek from The Washington Post Company. Harman then entered into a partnership with Barry Diller and IAC. Tina Brown — editor of Newsweek and The Daily Beast — tried her best, but aside from generating some catchy/creepy covers, Newsweek continued to flounder. After the magazine was folded, Diller even admitted that being involved with Newsweek was a mistake.

IAC will operate Newsweek for the next 60 days, after that, it’s all IBT Media’s. For better or worse.

Author Googles His Way to Tragic Tale of Wrongfully Executed Elephant

Ahead of journalist Michael Daly‘s 7 p.m. book reading and signing event tomorrow night at Brooklyn Heights Montessori School, Samantha Samel of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle caught up with the author of Topsy: The Startling Story of the Crooked-Tailed Elephant, P. T. Barnum, and the American Wizard, Thomas Edison.

Published July 2 by Atlantic Monthly Press, the book offers a thoroughly researched look at the early days of U.S. circuses and the sad, symptomatic storyline of Topsy. Smuggled into the U.S. in 1877, the performing elephant ultimately met with a tragic, cruel end. Daly explains how he came to the topic:

“My editor suggested doing a murder case from earlier times. I Googled New York executions and came across the clip of Topsy being electrocuted in 1903.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Apple Found Guilty | Hasselbeck’s Farewell | Newsweek Nears Sale


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Apple Colluded on eBook Prices, Judge Finds (Reuters)
In a sweeping rejection of Apple Inc’s strategy for selling electronic books on the Internet, a federal judge ruled that the company conspired with five major publishers to raise eBook prices. U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan found “compelling evidence” that Apple violated federal antitrust law by playing a “central role” in a conspiracy with the publishers to eliminate retail price competition and raise eBook prices. GalleyCat “After carefully weighing the evidence, the court agreed with the Justice Department and 33 state attorneys general that executives at the highest levels of Apple orchestrated a conspiracy with five major publishers — Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Penguin and Simon & Schuster — to raise eBook prices,” the DOJ said in a statement. “Through [Wednesday's] court decision and previous settlements with five major publishers, consumers are again benefitting from retail price competition and paying less for their eBooks.” Fortune Apple has announced that it will appeal Cote’s decision. And if it’s to prevail in the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals or — if it comes to that — the Supreme Court, it will be on the strength or weakness of her responses to the six major arguments Apple raised in its defense. NYT The verdict in the Apple case might have been a foregone conclusion, telegraphed by the judge herself, but it emphatically underlined how the traditional players in the book business have been upended. Only Amazon, led by Jeff Bezos, seems to have a plan. He is executing it with a skill that infuriates his competitors and rewards his stockholders. paidContent Judge Cote plans to schedule a separate hearing to determine damages and other consequences for Apple. These could be stayed pending appeal. Because all of the publishers in the case have settled and have entered into new agreements with Apple, it is unclear what kinds of changes Apple could be forced to make. There are a few possible answers, however, in a government pre-trial brief.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Zynga Lays Off 520 | Newsweek’s Poor Stats | Chris Cuomo’s Conflict?


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Zynga to Lay Off 520 Employees — 18 Percent of Staff — And Shutter New York And LA Offices (AllThingsD)
Zynga is laying off 18 percent of its workforce — which represents 520 employees — in a bid to reduce costs and more drastically restructure its troubled business toward mobile, according to sources close to the situation. Reuters One of the first firms to seize upon Facebook as a game-publishing platform years ago, Zynga has struggled to keep hold of players as people increasingly turn to their mobile devices — and games from Zynga’s rivals — for entertainment. Zynga’s chief executive, Mark Pincus, has shut studios, retired more than a dozen games and laid off hundreds of employees as part of a turnaround effort that focuses resources on developing mobile games. USA Today Two troubling trends have hit Zynga; for starters, fewer people are playing Zynga games, with the number of overall players dropping by more than 10 percent from last year. And those who are playing aren’t spending as much, with the company posting a first-quarter drop of about 30 percent from 2012. SocialTimes “None of us ever expected to face a day like today, especially when so much of our culture has been about growth… The scale that served us so well in building and delivering the leading social gaming service on the Web is now making it hard to successfully lead across mobile and multiplatform, which is where social games are going to be played,” said Pincus in an internal memo to employees. AppNewser Despite the layoffs, the company is still hiring in some positions across its locations. According to the company’s website, there are jobs available in its San Francisco, San Diego, Seattle and Beijing offices, among other places. Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Zynga Lays Off 520 | Newsweek’s Poor Stats | Chris Cuomo’s Conflict?


Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Zynga to Lay Off 520 Employees — 18 Percent of Staff — And Shutter New York And LA Offices (AllThingsD)
Zynga is laying off 18 percent of its workforce — which represents 520 employees — in a bid to reduce costs and more drastically restructure its troubled business toward mobile, according to sources close to the situation. Reuters One of the first firms to seize upon Facebook as a game-publishing platform years ago, Zynga has struggled to keep hold of players as people increasingly turn to their mobile devices — and games from Zynga’s rivals — for entertainment. Zynga’s chief executive, Mark Pincus, has shut studios, retired more than a dozen games and laid off hundreds of employees as part of a turnaround effort that focuses resources on developing mobile games. USA Today Two troubling trends have hit Zynga; for starters, fewer people are playing Zynga games, with the number of overall players dropping by more than 10 percent from last year. And those who are playing aren’t spending as much, with the company posting a first-quarter drop of about 30 percent from 2012. SocialTimes “None of us ever expected to face a day like today, especially when so much of our culture has been about growth… The scale that served us so well in building and delivering the leading social gaming service on the Web is now making it hard to successfully lead across mobile and multiplatform, which is where social games are going to be played,” said Pincus in an internal memo to employees. AppNewser Despite the layoffs, the company is still hiring in some positions across its locations. According to the company’s website, there are jobs available in its San Francisco, San Diego, Seattle and Beijing offices, among other places.

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