TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Nicholas Lemann’

Steve Coll Named Dean of Columbia Graduate School of Journalism

Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and former Washington Post managing editor Steve Coll has been named dean of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. He will succeed Nicholas Lemann, who has announced he was stepping down as dean last October. Lemann had been the school’s dean since 2003.

Coll was most recently the president of The New American Foundation and worked at WaPo from 1985 to 2004. He is also the author of seven books, a frequent contributor to The New Yorker.

“Steve Coll is one of the most experienced and respected journalists of his generation,” said Columbia’s president, Lee Bollinger, in a statement. “Sweeping changes in digital technology and the global marketplace have created unprecedented challenges and opportunities for the news media that demand our constant reflection on the mission and substance of a modern journalism education. Our Journalism School is thriving today because of its innovative response to these developments, and Steve’s breadth of experience as a reporter, editor, author and executive make him ideally suited to lead the School in the years ahead.”

Mediabistro Course

Get a Literary Agent

Get a Literary AgentStarting August 6, learn how to find the right agent for your book and write a query that will get the deal done! Taught by Barbara Clark, a book agent and publishing consultant, you will learn the best methods for finding a literary agent, the proper protocol and etiquette for seeking literary representation, how to send queries and more. Register now!

Nicholas Lemann, Dean of Columbia Journalism School, to Step Down

Bloomberg New is reporting that Nicholas Lemann, the dean of Columbia University’s Journalism School since 2003, is stepping down. According to CJR, Lemann will take one year off from the school and then return as a faculty member.

Lemann is the author of several books and has contributed to many different publications, including The New York Times, The New Yorker and Slate.

Lemann has held a variety of positions in the past, from managing editor of Washington Monthly to executive editor of Texas Monthly.

Lemann is credited with growing the Journalism school immensely during his time there. He added 20 full-time staffers, launched and finished the school’s first capital fundraising effort, ushered in a student center and debuted several investigative reporting programs.

Columbia Journalism School Renames Building After Pulitzer

The Columbia Graduate School of Journalism is renaming its Journalism building to “Pulitzer Hall,” in honor of its founder, Joseph Pulitzer. The update will formally take place on April 20, the school’s 100th anniversary.

“Among Joseph Pulitzer’s many contributions to journalism was his understanding that the profession must innovate and modernize to continue to meet its public responsibility,” explained University President Lee C.  Bollinger. “This renaming comes at a fitting time, as it allows us to celebrate the Journalism School’s proud heritage, while recognizing the pioneering scholarship and teaching that is occurring at Columbia during this moment of transformative change in the field.”

“Our school is very fortunate in having a compelling founder and a fascinating institutional history,” added Nicholas Lemann, Dean of Columbia’s Journalism School. “We are happy to have an opportunity to make the connection more plainly. The Pulitzer family has remained involved with the Journalism School, but is no longer in the newspaper business. The school and the Pulitzer Prizes are its legacy in journalism.”

Google’s Krishna Bharat To Join Columbia Graduate School Of Journalism

Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism made a major acquisition today by naming Krishna Bharat the Hearst New Media Professional-in-Residence.  Bharat is the founder and engineering head of Google News and recognized worldwide as one of the industry’s most influential computer scientists. 

Although he will continue to work out of Google headquarters in Mountain View, CA, Bharat will stay in touch with students in person and in virtual forums.  He will be a key resource for the recently founded Tow Center for Digital Journalism and deliver the annual Hearst New Media Lecture on April 7, 2011. 

School of Journalism dean Nicholas Lemann says he is pleased to bring Barat’s influence to Columbia and praised his role in new media:

In founding Google News, Krishna became a real pioneer in making professional journalism more widely accessible than ever before, and he continues to be one of the leading thinkers about how news and information is disseminated digitally. We are excited that he will be here to exchange ideas with our students and faculty.”

Bharat joins The Huffington Post’s chairman and co-founder Kenneth Lerer and former ESPN.com editor-in-chief, Neal Scarborough in the line of recent digital media experts to be appointed Hearst New Media Professional-in-Residence.

For more on Krishna Barat, check out our interview here: So What Do You Do, Krishna Bharat, Lead Engineer of Google News?

Columbia, Brokaw Honor Seattle Times Investigative Reporter Armstrong With John Chancellor Award

ken at podium.jpg
Ken Armstrong accepts the John Chancellor Award

“The only way I can get into Columbia is to be asked to speak,” joked NBC News correspondent Tom Brokaw as he kicked off the ceremony for the John Chancellor Award for Excellence in Journalism at Columbia’s Low Library last night.

Brokaw spoke about the award’s namesake, his former colleague John Chancellor, as well as the night’s award recipient, Ken Armstrong, an investigative journalist at The Seattle Times.

Columbia Journalism School Dean Nicholas Lemann also introduced a number of people who had worked with Armstrong over the years, including Seattle Times executive editor David Boardman and the publisher of Armstrong’s college paper, Pat Kuhnle. They all spoke highly of Armstrong, about his important investigative works including a series on the death penalty in Illinois while he was working for The Chicago Tribune.

“I am truly flattered,” Armstrong said, upon accepting the award. “The work I do isn’t always dramatic.”

brokaw 3.jpg
Tom Brokaw

Journos Explain Blogging, Speak Slowly

andrew-sullivan-why-i-blog-wide.jpg

Andrew Sullivan‘s essay in the Atlantic, “Why I Blog,” is interesting enough for bloggers — and mild enough for their grandmas, as evidenced by his lede:

“The word blog is a conflation of two words: Web and log. It contains in its four letters a concise and accurate self-description: it is a log of thoughts and writing posted publicly on the World Wide Web. In the monosyllabic vernacular of the Internet, Web log soon became the word blog.”

Still awake?

On Point provides Sullivan’s take along with a few opposing viewpoints by Nicholas Lemann and David Carr in what amounts to a panel discussion on blogging.

A pretty good read — unless you’re one of the 100 SoCal print reporters who just lost their jobs in the last week. If you are, maybe don’t read it.