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Posts Tagged ‘Nicholas Thompson’

The New Yorker Names Online Business Editor

Vauhini Vara is joining The New Yorker as business editor of Newyorker.com. Vara comes to the site from The Wall Street Journal, where she had been since 2003, serving as a staff reporter.

“Vauhini is everything we want in a business reporter: she breaks news, files F.O.I.A. requests, and writes beautifully,” said Nicholas Thompson, editor of Newyorker.com, in a statement. “I’ve always wanted someone who can cover the S.E.C. and who has also studied literary fiction. She’ll do a great job in further expanding our rapidly growing business coverage on newyorker.com.”

Vara begins July 29.

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Jonah Lehrer’s Situation Gets Worse [Update]

Jonah Lehrer, formerly of Wired and recently hired by The New Yorker, is in serious trouble. Jim Romenesko pointed out that Lehrer lifted parts of a New Yorker piece from one he wrote for The Wall Street Journal, and the situation has snowballed since then. New York’s Daily Intel noted several other instances of Lehrer plagiarizing himself and now Edward Champion explains that Lehrer recycled material for his book, Imagine. Poynter also found that he lifted quotes from a story written by someone else:

An editor’s note at the foot of his excellent New Yorker piece on brainstorming says some Noam Chomsky quotes within it ‘were not made directly to Jonah Lehrer’ and that ‘Chomsky and his colleague were interviewed by Peter Dizikes for his article in the November/December issue of Technology Review.’ Gulp.

Gulp indeed. As of now, the only comment from the New Yorker is from its web editor, Nicholas Thompson, who called the plagiarizing “a mistake.” A slew of Lehrer’s posts on his “Frontal Cortex” blog also have editors notes tacked onto them. But how long until Lehrer gets the axe? He can’t possibly keep his job after all this, can he?

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The New Yorker Will Conquer the Digital Future and You Will Like It

The New Yorker is quite pleased with its digital operations, and its editors aren’t shy about telling everyone. David Remnick, the magazine’s editor-in-chief, appeared on CBS This Morning and when the subject of paywalls came up, Remnick got testy. “Look, you cannot get these stories for free,” he explained. “I cannot give you everything on the Internet for free and make you think The New Yorker is something that comes out of the faucet.” Agreed!

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NewYorker.com Gets New Editor

Nicholas Thompson has been named the new Editor of NewYorker.com. Politico reports that Thompson will succeed Blake Eskin, who has left to pursue other interests.

Thompson has been with The New Yorker since 2010 as a Senior Editor.

Thompson is also a Contributing Editor for Bloomberg TV and Co-Founder of The Atavist, a publishing house that produces nonfiction works for digital mediums.

 

Meet The Atavist, the New App for Long-Form Journalism

“The Web is good at creating short and snappy bits of information, but not so much when it comes to long-form, edited, fact-and-spell-checked work,” said Nicholas Thompson, former senior editor at Wired (and current senior editor of The New Yorker).

So true. This sentiment prompted Thompson and Wired freelancer Evan Ratliff to collaborate with programmer and Web designer Jefferson Rabb to come up with The Atavist, an app which offers both clean text and multimedia for long-form journalism on the web.

Readers who buy an article from The Atavist for the iPad, according to David Carr at the New York Times, can begin reading a piece at home, then switch to an audio version on their drive to work. Useful! Since its debut, The Atavist has published three long pieces and has had over 40,000 downloads of its app. At the moment, an article costs $2.99 for the iPad and $1.99 for the Kindle or Nook. The Atavist is also looking to scale their approach to nonfiction books.

Moreover, instead of being developed far away in some anonymous garage in Silicon Valley, Carr points out that The Atavist was conceived “in bars up and down Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn.” Now if that won’t sell you on it, nothing will.