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Posts Tagged ‘Nick Denton’

Nick Denton Thinks About Things

A hot rumor currently circulating is that Nick Denton (Gawker’s founder) and Henry Blodgett (Business Insider’s founder) will merge their sites into what we can only imagine would be an endless stream of snarky and/or sanctimonious slideshows. However, according to Denton, there’s nothing to the rumor; he has merely thought about it.

When Gigaom asked Denton if there was any truth to the merger, Denton replied, “No. I told Henry to get in touch if they ever decide to sell. I’m a fan of their editorial management. That’s about it.” Gigaom pressed anyway, asking if BI was going to sell — which they’re not, as far as anyone knows — would he consider buying? “Yes,” replied Denton, via IM.

So there you have it. Denton has thought about something, and might think about something again. Media news!

Media Experts Weigh in on Who Should Buy The New York Times

The New York Times is not for sale. The New York Times is not for sale. Okay, one more time: The New York Times is not for sale, dammit. Now that we’ve repeated this already repeated fact, let’s be straight here — it doesn’t matter if the Times is for sale or not, because media people love talking about it anyway.

The New Republic knows that this is a subject that just won’t go away, so they went ahead and asked several experts who they think should buy the paper of record. Below are some of their answers. Click through for their expanded answers.

Gawker Launches Redesign, Readers Hate It


Gawker Media has revamped its website layout once again, and once again, readers are voicing their disapproval. For the record, we agree with the readers, the design sucks. However, it was changed because of that thing called money.

The most recent version of Gawker sites featured a lot of large images and space. The new look is much more dense, replacing the big photos — most of which were great — with smaller ones. The other big change is a box ad on the left side of the page, which sort of sticks out. Nick Denton, Gawker’s CEO, expects everyone to get used to it. “Viewability is increasingly important to advertisers,” he told Digiday. “And like it or not, the 300 x 250 is the most common ad on the web.”

Just like every other Gawker redesign, readers greeted the change with irrational anger.

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Nick Denton Talks to Nieman About Gawker Media’s ‘Most Significant’ Tech Investment

It rhymes with “ninja” and Denton tells Nieman Lab’s Adrienne LaFrance that for the past year, a team of 30 full-time tech staffers has been working hard to integrate it across Gawker Media properties. Tonight, that Kinja coolness is being fully implemented.

It’s the latest bold attempt by Denton to reinvigorate the experience of commenting on and sharing breaking news, gossip. Among the more notable aspects of what LaFrance refers to as an embedded “reblogging platform” is the ability for readers to create new, customized headlines and teasers for a Gawker, Jezebel or other site story:

“For instance, say a story was written for gamers — they can translate it for a more general audience,” Denton said. “And, if that URL is shared, it is shared with the new headline and intro.”

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Nick Denton in Fleshbot Payment Dispute

Nick Denton wants his porn money. The head of Gawker Media has filed papers with New York’s Supreme Court claiming that he still hasn’t been paid for the sale of Fleshbot, the porntastic site that used to be under the Gawker umbrella.

The New York Post reports that Denton alleges Noa Gottlieb signed a promissory note to pay $100,000 Fleshbot. The total would be paid in four installments that were supposed to begin May 1 of last year. But Denton and his legal team claim that never happened. “Fleshbot made none of the $25,000 payments and despite repeated requests for payment still owes Gawker $100,000 plus interest,” read a court filing.

Gottlieb’s position (Haha!) on the matter is that “actions” by Denton and Gawker Media voided the promissory note.

Gawker Post Reaming Rupert Murdoch’s Mostly-White Team Ignites Race Debate

When Gawker’s John Cook noticed a grainy photo of Rupert Murdoch “hanging with the Dow Jones team” on the News Corporation CEO’s Tumblr, he proposed to his readers a game.

Let’s Play Spot the Non-Whites Around Rupert Murdoch!

But Gawker’s fierce commenters turned the gun on Nick Denton‘s flagship site.

“Gawker media is not exactly a Rainbow,” wrote one under the nom-de-commentaire, birthdeath. “Pot, meet kettle.”

“No, not a rainbow. But for what it’s worth and since you asked, 1/3 of our masthead (at this site, not company-wide) is not white,” Cook replied.

Wrote another commenter: “I’m sure the difficulty in having more people of color at sites like Buzzfeed and Gawker is that they only want to pay people under 40,000 a year….and they want them to live in NYC and be super trendy etc. So who can afford to live like that? Trust-fund, predominately white, babies of course. See: Lena Dunham’s character in ‘Girls.’”

So, was Cook race-baiting for clicks, here? Or was he making a fair observation? Tell us in the comments below.

Image: [Tumblr]

 

Nick Denton Explains Google, Probably Hates This Headline Because It’s Too Long

Nick Denton, the man behind the Gawker Media empire, schooled some people today. Pay attention now, students.

The First Lesson: Headlines 101, Bitch. Denton sent a memo (as in, posted it on Gawker) that said the company’s writers were too long-winded with their headlines. Beginning tomorrow, all Gawker posts must have headlines of 70 characters or under. Or else!

“Our wordy headlines are a growing disadvantage,” wrote Denton. “That’s why from tomorrow we’re going to warn you in the Kinja editor to keep your headlines below 70 characters — and we’re going to only display 70 characters on the front page even if you go longer.”

The Second Lesson: Google 210, Mothef*ckers. The savvy Denton noted that the reason for the headline change was that Google cuts headlines off at 70 characters, and pieces with longer headlines won’t get as much traffic as shorter ones. ”Google demotes search results that don’t get clicked on,” the media maven explained.

Class is dismissed, fools.

Ken Layne Recalls the Enterprise Known as LAExaminer.com

Despite the Church of Scientology across the street, the pit bulls next door and a car that didn’t really work, Ken Layne insists his original home office set-up for LA’s defunct LAExaminer.com was “very pleasant.” That description also applies to his overall reminiscences for The Awl.

Layne says he was prompted to start the site and quickly rope in neighborhood pal Matt Welch by his daily dose of Romenesko. Later on, Richard Riordan would almost turn the blog into a weekly print publication, which would have been super cool:

The style was just the way we talked around endless pitchers at Ye Rustic Inn up the street on Hillhurst, full of moral certainty and outrage and cheap jokes — it’s what is widely practiced and critically dismissed as “snark” today, although we never had any interest in celebrities. The dreary mayor James Hahn and the pompous columnists at the terrible Los Angeles Times were regular topics, as was boosterism about the Lakers, public transportation and the eastside neighborhoods in general. We were reflexively opposed to the bland wealthy valet parking lot of the Westside.

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A.J. Daulerio Steps Aside as Editor of Gawker, John Cook Takes Over

The A.J. Daulerio Gawker era is coming to a close. According to New York’s Daily Intelligencer, Daulerio is stepping down as editor-in-chief of Gawker, and John Cook is succeeding him.

“John Cook is the most experienced reporter on the team, a surprisingly powerful opinion writer and a gossip of the most refined kind,” wrote Nick Denton, in a memo. “He has natural authority. John will preserve the crew and build on the success of 2012. I’m grateful to AJ for leaving Gawker in such great shape and I can’t wait to see what John and his colleagues will do in 2013. Roger Ailes’ excitement may be more muted.”

For the full Denton memo and Daulerio’s note to staffers, head over to Daily Intelligencer.

Hurricane Sandy Takes Down Gawker Media, Mediaite, HuffPost, BuzzFeed [Update]

Hurricane Sandy hit the city hard, and along with flooding and devastation, several media companies saw their sites go down. All Gawker Media sites, Mediaite, The Huffington Post, and BuzzFeed were down at some point as Sandy made its way across land.

The source of the outage is flooding at Datagram, which houses the servers used by all the sites that went out. “Gawker sites down after power cut off at Datagram, our data center down on Whitehall St. Backup power didn’t kick in fast enough,” tweeted Nick Denton.

The Huffington Post was down, but is now publishing posts on an extremely stripped down version of the site. “Due to power outages caused by Superstorm Sandy, our own website is experiencing technical difficulties,” reads a post on the site.

BuzzFeed is up now, but isn’t being updated. According to their Twitter account, they’re updating content via other platforms, such as Tumblr.

UPDATE:
BuzzFeed and The Huffington Post are both back up.

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