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Posts Tagged ‘Nielsen’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Yahoo! Revives Community | AP to Automate Earnings Stories

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Community Picked Up by Yahoo! (LostRemote)
Greendale Community College is reopening its doors — on Yahoo! The cancelled NBC sitcom Community has been picked up by Yahoo for a 13-episode sixth season. Mashable Until recently, Community’s studio, Sony, had been in talks with Hulu about resurrecting the series following its May cancellation by NBC. NYT Community, which uses a study group at Greendale Community College as the jumping-off point for its self-referential story lines and pop culture obsessions, comes with a core audience of passionate fans. Those fans helped save the show from a previous threat of cancellation two seasons ago. Yahoo! Screen offers reruns of many shows, but Yahoo! has been putting more emphasis on adding original shows. WSJ In April, it announced the launch of 30-minute comedies Other Space and Sin City Saints, which will debut next year. In a time of “cord-cutting,” online services have helped attract subscribers with shows such as Netflix’s Orange Is The New Black and Amazon’s Alpha House. Deadline Hollywood The deal for Community extends Sony TV’s strong track record in bringing back cancelled series. The studio previously brokered a deal to move acclaimed drama Damages to DirecTV after it was cancelled by FX, and found a way to bring back on their original networks cancelled series Drop Dead Diva on Lifetime and Unforgettable on CBS. All three series have gone to air multiple seasons post-cancellation. What wasn’t immediately clear was how Yahoo! plans to make money from continuing the cult show online.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Risen Appeal Rejected | Top Social TV Shows

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Supreme Court Will Not Review Risen Case (The Guardian)
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a lower court’s order requiring a New York Times reporter to testify in a criminal case against a former source, deepening the court’s silence on the question of protections for journalists and confidential sources. FishbowlDC The issue dates back to a May 2011 subpoena received by James Risen to identify a source for his 2006 book State of War: The Secret History of The CIA and the Bush Administration. NYT The court’s one-line order gave no reasons but effectively sided with the government in a confrontation between what prosecutors said was an imperative to secure evidence in a national security prosecution and what journalists said was an intolerable infringement of press freedom. NPR / The Two-Way Risen has said he would refuse to testify in order to protect the identity of his source. Federal prosecutors argued that they need him to testify to pursue their criminal case against Jeffrey Sterling, a former CIA officer. WSJ A divided U.S. appeals court based in Richmond, Va., sided with the government last year, ruling that Risen didn’t have a reporter’s privilege allowing him to refuse to testify about the source and scope of classified information allegedly disclosed to him. The court said there is no privilege in criminal cases that protects a reporter from testifying about conduct the reporter allegedly witnessed or participated in. USA Today Since Obama took office, federal authorities have filed at least seven leak-related criminal cases, including against former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden for leaks about government surveillance programs and Army Pfc. Bradley Manning for giving classified information to the website Wikileaks.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Angelou Dies at 86 | Williams Interviews Snowden | Amazon Talks Hatchette Dispute

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Medal of Freedom Recipient Maya Angelou Dies at 86 (FishbowlDC)
Poet and author Maya Angelou died Wednesday at the age of 86, according to her literary agent Helen Brann. Angelou received the country’s highest civilian honor — the Medal of Freedom — in 2011 from President Obama, and is most widely known for her award-winning memoir I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings. NYT The cause of death was not immediately known, but Brann said Angelou had been frail for some time and had heart problems. GalleyCat In addition to writing, Angelou proved to be an accomplished Renaissance woman who worked as an activist, entertainer, streetcar conductor, magazine editor, college professor and lecturer. CNN Angelou’s legacy is twofold. She leaves behind a body of important artistic work that influenced several generations. But the 86-year-old was praised by those who knew her as a good person, a woman who pushed for justice and education and equality. In her full life, she wrote staggeringly beautiful poetry. She also wrote a cookbook and was nominated for a Tony. Reuters Literary and entertainment figures, politicians and fans mourned her passing on Wednesday. Obama said his sister, Maya, was named for the author, whom he called “a brilliant writer, a fierce friend and a truly phenomenal woman.” Media mogul Oprah Winfrey, who frequently threw lavish birthday parties for Angelou and considered her a mentor, said she would remember her friend most for how she lived her life. “She moved through the world with unshakeable calm, confidence and a fierce grace,” Winfrey said.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: YouTube to Acquire Twitch | Abramson Speaks | Pilhofer to Guardian

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YouTubeTwitch

YouTube to Acquire Videogame-Streaming Service Twitch for $1 Billion (Variety)
Google’s YouTube has reached a deal to buy Twitch, a popular videogame-streaming company, for more than $1 billion, according to sources familiar with the pact. If completed the acquisition would be the most significant in the history of YouTube, which Google acquired in 2006 for $1.65 billion. The impending acquisition comes after longtime Google ad exec Susan Wojcicki was named CEO of YouTube earlier this year. SocialTimes As more consumers cut the cord in search of alternative forms of entertainment, Twitch has experienced impressive growth. In 2013, the service had more unique monthly users than Netflix and Hulu, and it jumped into the top 15 online services recently, passing HBO Go in terms of bandwidth. Mashable More than 1 million gamers broadcast on Twitch each month through Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and their computers; more than 45 million people log on to watch each month. Since its founding in 2011, Twitch has raised more than $35 million in funding. And let’s not forget Twitch Plays Pokémon earlier this year, which was possibly one of the most popular open source gaming experiences ever. GigaOM The Twitch acquisition could help YouTube finally get a foothold in the live video space. Live video has been a complicated subject for YouTube. The video service started to dabble with live streaming all the way back in 2010. In reality, live still doesn’t get big enough audiences to warrant high ad prices, and the fragmented nature of live streaming on YouTube hasn’t made it easier to win over big brands. Twitch has been the one notable exception to this move away from ad-supported live streaming.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Newsweek Controversy | Mexico Moves on Telco | NJ President Out

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newsweek bitcoin

Controversy Marks Newsweek’s Comeback (The Associated Press)
A mystery man. A splashy reveal. A media frenzy. Newsweek staked its return from the dead Friday on a story it knew would get attention. A cover story claiming it had uncovered “the face behind Bitcoin,” the world’s most popular digital currency. Twenty-four hours after identifying Bitcoin’s creator as a 64-year-old former defense contractor employee living in Los Angeles, the controversy over whether or not Newsweek had outed the right man was so furious that Newsweek reporter Leah McGrath Goodman made the rounds on Bloomberg TV and CBS Morning News to defend her reporting against Dorian Nakamoto’s denials that he is the father of Bitcoin. Mashable For the first few hours after the article was published online Thursday, Newsweek enjoyed the kind of attention that most publications would kill for. The Bitcoin story dominated the conversation on social media; 700,000 readers had viewed it as of 5 p.m. ET on Thursday. It went on to top 1 million views. FishbowlNY Within the first few hours of the story’s release, however, Nakamoto emerged to deny any involvement with the digital currency, prompting a media frenzy. In a two-hour interview with the AP Thursday, Nakamoto denied having any involvement in Bitcoin, and the only reason he had ever heard of it was because a Newsweek reporter contacted his son three weeks ago. Nakamoto also said that during a brief interview at his home, McGrath Goodman misunderstood him (English isn’t Nakamoto’s first language). Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The account that created Bitcoin in 2009 has also suggested that the Newsweek story is inaccurate: “I’m not Dorian Nakamoto,” said the account holder, whose online name is Satoshi Nakamoto, according to USA Today. Newsweek In a statement released Friday, Newsweek defended the story: “Goodman’s research was conducted under the same high editorial and ethical standards that have guided Newsweek for more than 80 years. Newsweek stands strongly behind Goodman and her article”

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Not So Fast: Yahoo May NOT Have Surpassed Google in July

Ad Age‘s Tim Peterson dug a little deeper in the wake of all that yodeling about Yahoo having surpassed Google for the first time in two years in monthly U.S. unique visitor traffic.

The reporter explains that only Yahoo has comScore “census tags” affixed to its sites. What this means is that for July, the immediate Yahoo numbers came from a much more extensive and specific pathway than those of Google, which were calculated using the more traditional method of a comScore “panel” that was then extrapolated. From Peterson’s piece:

comScore’s methodology likely explains why Nielsen, which relies only on panels for its traffic measures, sees a greater gap between Google and Yahoo and not in Yahoo’s favor. “During July 2013 we measured Google as the top parent company for web activity (170M unique US visitors) and Yahoo as the ranked fourth (126M unique US visitors) in the U.S.,” emailed a Nielsen spokesperson.

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Surprise: Americans Don’t Use The Internet for News

Nielsen released a report on the social media habits of Americans today, and guess what? It reveals that people mostly use the Internet for Twitter, gaming, videos and the classifieds, not online news. According to Poynter, Americans spend almost 23 percent of their browsing time on social media, compared to just three percent on “global news and current events.”

While some of the categories are vague, and every report should be treated with a grain of salt, this doesn’t sound good for online news sites. Maybe it doesn’t matter what The Boston Globe does after all.

Social networking sites weren’t the most popular though. The study says that we spend the majority of our Internet time — about 35 percent — on “other” sites. Yes, that means porn.

FT Appointments|Nielsen’s New Ratings|McGraw-Hill Earnings|Davos Colors|WSJ‘s Travel Agency

<td style='padding:2px 1px 0px 5px;' colspan='2'Moment of Zen – They Started It
The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon – Thurs 11p / 10c
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show
Full Episodes
Political Humor Health Care Crisis

Editor & Publisher: The Financial Times makes a number of staff appointments.

AdAge: Nielsen will combine TV and online ratings.

New York Times: Former BusinessWeek publisher McGraw-Hill today posted increased earnings for the fourth quarter.

The Business Insider: Reporters at the World Economic Forum in Davos are getting color coded.

MediaPost: In search of another source of revenue, The Wall Street Journal is launching a travel agency this week.

Breaking: Beckman Leaves Condé Nast

beckman.jpgIt’s official: Richard Beckman, chief executive of Women’s Wear Daily publisher Fairchild Fashion Group resigned this morning. He is leaving the Condé Nast division to become CEO of e5 Global Media, a recently created media company that purchased The Hollywood Reporter, Billboard, MediaWeek and AdWeek from Nielsen last month, in a move first reported by The New York Post.

Beckman moved from his position as president of the Condé Nast Media Group to Fairchild last March, a move that was seen by many in the industry as a demotion. Condé Nast has yet to name a replacement.

Update: The Hollywood Reporter writes today about the new CEO of its parent company: “Beckman said his career and passion have focused on music, entertainment and media, ‘making this collection of brands particularly alluring to me.’ He added: ‘I look forward to developing these valuable brands and improving and extending them in the years to come.’”

Read more: Beckman Resigns as Fairchild CEOWWD

Conde rainmaker Richard Beckman eyes exitNew York Post

Previously: Richard Beckman Named President, CEO of Fairchild, Investor Group Buys Eight Nielsen Brands

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: New York Media’s Biggest Business Decisions

4 times square.jpgNew York is home to some of the biggest media companies in the country, like Condé Nast, The New York Times Co., News Corp., Hearst and Time Warner, just to name a few.

This year, those companies were imperiled, struggling to survive like many other companies around the world. But as print media disputed declarations that its days were numbered, these once-great companies that made their money from print pubs were fighting hard to keep their heads above water. In order to do that they made some decisions — like bringing in new investors, closing publications and selling them off. It was in no way a big year for media deals, but there were a few. Below, our list of the biggest business stories to come out of the New York media world this year.

Bloomberg LP Buys BusinessWeek

After seeking a buyer for BusinessWeek for most of the fall, publisher McGraw-Hill finally cut a deal with Bloomberg LP, which snapped up the magazine in October. The result? Bloomberg BusinessWeek, a new vision of the mag that has a new editor and a smaller staff.

After the jump, Carlos Slim invests in the Times, classical music and the Comcast-NBCU deal.

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