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Posts Tagged ‘Nielsen’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Ben Bradlee Dies at 93 | Pew Finds Partisan News Consumption

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Former Washington Post Editor Ben Bradlee Dies at 93 (FishbowlDC)
Former editor of The Washington Post Ben Bradlee died Tuesday of natural causes at the age of 93 at his home in Washington. Bradley served as executive editor of The Washington Post from 1968-1991, a time that included the resignation of President Richard Nixon and the Watergate scandal. The Washington Post Bradlee’s most important decision, made with publisher Katharine Graham, the Post’s publisher, may have been to print stories based on the Pentagon Papers, a secret Pentagon history of the Vietnam War. The Post’s circulation nearly doubled while Bradlee was in charge of the newsroom — first as managing editor and then as executive editor — as did the size of its newsroom staff. NYT With full backing from Graham, Bradlee led the Post into the first rank of American newspapers, courting controversy and giving it standing as a thorn in the side of Washington officials. When government officials called to complain, Bradlee acted as a buffer between them and his staff. “Just get it right,” he would tell his reporters. Most of the time they did, but there were mistakes, one so big that the paper had to return a Pulitzer Prize. Boston Globe It was Bradlee who guided the Post through its coverage of the Watergate scandal — “the story of our generation,” he later called it, “the story that put us all on the map” — and his unwavering leadership was crucial to the success of the paper’s investigations during the nine months between the break-in at Democratic National Committee headquarters on June 17, 1972, and the sentencing of the Watergate burglars on March 23, 1973, a period during which the Post was far out in front of the rest of the media in covering the scandal and, as a result, dangerously exposed to criticism from the Nixon administration. Reuters Bradlee’s death at his Washington home of natural causes was announced by the Post, which reported late last month that he had begun hospice care after suffering from Alzheimer’s disease for several years.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Cuts Hit CNN, HLN | Nielsen Revision Puts Nightly News on Top

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Layoffs Begin at CNN (TVNewser)
Layoffs have begun at CNN. As many as 300, or 8 percent, of CNN’s workforce is being cut in Atlanta, Washington, D.C., New York and Los Angeles. FishbowlDC Up to 28 positions are rumored to be eliminated Tuesday and Wednesday from CNN’s Washington bureau. In August, Turner sent out an email to staff including those at CNN, offering a voluntary separation program to employees 55 and over who have worked for Turner for 10 or more years. Mashable CNN has cut Christiane Amanpour’s entire staff in New York as part of the cable news channel’s restructuring. Amanpour, CNN’s chief international correspondent and anchor of a nightly foreign affairs program, will continue to produce international news segments for the network. TVNewser Jane Velez Mitchell’s nightly HLN show has been canceled as part of the cuts. Velez Mitchell will be leaving the network, as will the staff of the show — in all about 15 HLN employees. Capital New York In addition, CNN has shuttered its entertainment news unit, with some staff being laid off and others being folded into other departments. In addition, Darius Walker, VP and Northeast bureau chief, will leave the company. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The cuts are hitting all of CNN’s bureaus, with several back-office and corporate layoffs hitting Atlanta last week. Turner Broadcasting is restructuring under a “2020″ plan, which will cut the company’s total workforce by 10 percent, eliminating nearly 1,500 positions across their channels. CNN is expected to reduce its workforce by about 8 percent. More layoffs are expected Wednesday.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Nielsen Reveals Ratings Glitch | NBC Crew Quarantined

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Nielsen’s Ratings Problem Is A Total Glitch (LostRemote)
Nielsen Friday announced internal “ratings irregularities” that date back to March 2, 2014 and were “generally imperceptible until [the company] saw high viewing levels associated with fall season premiere week.” TVNewser The company will now reprocess all of the impacted data going back at least to Aug. 18 — for entertainment, news and syndicated shows. TVNewser The company Saturday released updated data for the week of Sept. 22, which was the first week of 2014-15 TV season. As suspected, the inaccurate data favored ABC programs while hurting ABC’s competitors. The restated numbers are being most closely watched for revisions to the primetime ratings as new fall shows had their premieres. In the tight evening news race, World News Tonight With David Muir, had its numbers revised down, but it didn’t change the outcome. Muir’s newscast still won the week in the demo, and NBC Nightly News With Brian Williams won among total viewers. HuffPost Nielsen, the leading global measurement company and provider of television ratings data, said in a press release Friday that “a technical error” resulted in incorrect data over the course of about seven months. WSJ The difference in what was misattributed was less than 0.05 of a ratings point for about 98 percent to 99 percent of broadcast and syndicated TV shows, Nielsen said. The error didn’t affect overall TV viewership numbers, only how that viewership was credited to particular networks. Cable TV ratings weren’t affected by the glitch, it said.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Yahoo! Revives Community | AP to Automate Earnings Stories

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Community Picked Up by Yahoo! (LostRemote)
Greendale Community College is reopening its doors — on Yahoo! The cancelled NBC sitcom Community has been picked up by Yahoo for a 13-episode sixth season. Mashable Until recently, Community’s studio, Sony, had been in talks with Hulu about resurrecting the series following its May cancellation by NBC. NYT Community, which uses a study group at Greendale Community College as the jumping-off point for its self-referential story lines and pop culture obsessions, comes with a core audience of passionate fans. Those fans helped save the show from a previous threat of cancellation two seasons ago. Yahoo! Screen offers reruns of many shows, but Yahoo! has been putting more emphasis on adding original shows. WSJ In April, it announced the launch of 30-minute comedies Other Space and Sin City Saints, which will debut next year. In a time of “cord-cutting,” online services have helped attract subscribers with shows such as Netflix’s Orange Is The New Black and Amazon’s Alpha House. Deadline Hollywood The deal for Community extends Sony TV’s strong track record in bringing back cancelled series. The studio previously brokered a deal to move acclaimed drama Damages to DirecTV after it was cancelled by FX, and found a way to bring back on their original networks cancelled series Drop Dead Diva on Lifetime and Unforgettable on CBS. All three series have gone to air multiple seasons post-cancellation. What wasn’t immediately clear was how Yahoo! plans to make money from continuing the cult show online.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Risen Appeal Rejected | Top Social TV Shows

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Supreme Court Will Not Review Risen Case (The Guardian)
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a lower court’s order requiring a New York Times reporter to testify in a criminal case against a former source, deepening the court’s silence on the question of protections for journalists and confidential sources. FishbowlDC The issue dates back to a May 2011 subpoena received by James Risen to identify a source for his 2006 book State of War: The Secret History of The CIA and the Bush Administration. NYT The court’s one-line order gave no reasons but effectively sided with the government in a confrontation between what prosecutors said was an imperative to secure evidence in a national security prosecution and what journalists said was an intolerable infringement of press freedom. NPR / The Two-Way Risen has said he would refuse to testify in order to protect the identity of his source. Federal prosecutors argued that they need him to testify to pursue their criminal case against Jeffrey Sterling, a former CIA officer. WSJ A divided U.S. appeals court based in Richmond, Va., sided with the government last year, ruling that Risen didn’t have a reporter’s privilege allowing him to refuse to testify about the source and scope of classified information allegedly disclosed to him. The court said there is no privilege in criminal cases that protects a reporter from testifying about conduct the reporter allegedly witnessed or participated in. USA Today Since Obama took office, federal authorities have filed at least seven leak-related criminal cases, including against former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden for leaks about government surveillance programs and Army Pfc. Bradley Manning for giving classified information to the website Wikileaks.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Angelou Dies at 86 | Williams Interviews Snowden | Amazon Talks Hatchette Dispute

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Medal of Freedom Recipient Maya Angelou Dies at 86 (FishbowlDC)
Poet and author Maya Angelou died Wednesday at the age of 86, according to her literary agent Helen Brann. Angelou received the country’s highest civilian honor — the Medal of Freedom — in 2011 from President Obama, and is most widely known for her award-winning memoir I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings. NYT The cause of death was not immediately known, but Brann said Angelou had been frail for some time and had heart problems. GalleyCat In addition to writing, Angelou proved to be an accomplished Renaissance woman who worked as an activist, entertainer, streetcar conductor, magazine editor, college professor and lecturer. CNN Angelou’s legacy is twofold. She leaves behind a body of important artistic work that influenced several generations. But the 86-year-old was praised by those who knew her as a good person, a woman who pushed for justice and education and equality. In her full life, she wrote staggeringly beautiful poetry. She also wrote a cookbook and was nominated for a Tony. Reuters Literary and entertainment figures, politicians and fans mourned her passing on Wednesday. Obama said his sister, Maya, was named for the author, whom he called “a brilliant writer, a fierce friend and a truly phenomenal woman.” Media mogul Oprah Winfrey, who frequently threw lavish birthday parties for Angelou and considered her a mentor, said she would remember her friend most for how she lived her life. “She moved through the world with unshakeable calm, confidence and a fierce grace,” Winfrey said.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: YouTube to Acquire Twitch | Abramson Speaks | Pilhofer to Guardian

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YouTubeTwitch

YouTube to Acquire Videogame-Streaming Service Twitch for $1 Billion (Variety)
Google’s YouTube has reached a deal to buy Twitch, a popular videogame-streaming company, for more than $1 billion, according to sources familiar with the pact. If completed the acquisition would be the most significant in the history of YouTube, which Google acquired in 2006 for $1.65 billion. The impending acquisition comes after longtime Google ad exec Susan Wojcicki was named CEO of YouTube earlier this year. SocialTimes As more consumers cut the cord in search of alternative forms of entertainment, Twitch has experienced impressive growth. In 2013, the service had more unique monthly users than Netflix and Hulu, and it jumped into the top 15 online services recently, passing HBO Go in terms of bandwidth. Mashable More than 1 million gamers broadcast on Twitch each month through Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and their computers; more than 45 million people log on to watch each month. Since its founding in 2011, Twitch has raised more than $35 million in funding. And let’s not forget Twitch Plays Pokémon earlier this year, which was possibly one of the most popular open source gaming experiences ever. GigaOM The Twitch acquisition could help YouTube finally get a foothold in the live video space. Live video has been a complicated subject for YouTube. The video service started to dabble with live streaming all the way back in 2010. In reality, live still doesn’t get big enough audiences to warrant high ad prices, and the fragmented nature of live streaming on YouTube hasn’t made it easier to win over big brands. Twitch has been the one notable exception to this move away from ad-supported live streaming.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Newsweek Controversy | Mexico Moves on Telco | NJ President Out

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Controversy Marks Newsweek’s Comeback (The Associated Press)
A mystery man. A splashy reveal. A media frenzy. Newsweek staked its return from the dead Friday on a story it knew would get attention. A cover story claiming it had uncovered “the face behind Bitcoin,” the world’s most popular digital currency. Twenty-four hours after identifying Bitcoin’s creator as a 64-year-old former defense contractor employee living in Los Angeles, the controversy over whether or not Newsweek had outed the right man was so furious that Newsweek reporter Leah McGrath Goodman made the rounds on Bloomberg TV and CBS Morning News to defend her reporting against Dorian Nakamoto’s denials that he is the father of Bitcoin. Mashable For the first few hours after the article was published online Thursday, Newsweek enjoyed the kind of attention that most publications would kill for. The Bitcoin story dominated the conversation on social media; 700,000 readers had viewed it as of 5 p.m. ET on Thursday. It went on to top 1 million views. FishbowlNY Within the first few hours of the story’s release, however, Nakamoto emerged to deny any involvement with the digital currency, prompting a media frenzy. In a two-hour interview with the AP Thursday, Nakamoto denied having any involvement in Bitcoin, and the only reason he had ever heard of it was because a Newsweek reporter contacted his son three weeks ago. Nakamoto also said that during a brief interview at his home, McGrath Goodman misunderstood him (English isn’t Nakamoto’s first language). Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The account that created Bitcoin in 2009 has also suggested that the Newsweek story is inaccurate: “I’m not Dorian Nakamoto,” said the account holder, whose online name is Satoshi Nakamoto, according to USA Today. Newsweek In a statement released Friday, Newsweek defended the story: “Goodman’s research was conducted under the same high editorial and ethical standards that have guided Newsweek for more than 80 years. Newsweek stands strongly behind Goodman and her article”

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Not So Fast: Yahoo May NOT Have Surpassed Google in July

Ad Age‘s Tim Peterson dug a little deeper in the wake of all that yodeling about Yahoo having surpassed Google for the first time in two years in monthly U.S. unique visitor traffic.

The reporter explains that only Yahoo has comScore “census tags” affixed to its sites. What this means is that for July, the immediate Yahoo numbers came from a much more extensive and specific pathway than those of Google, which were calculated using the more traditional method of a comScore “panel” that was then extrapolated. From Peterson’s piece:

comScore’s methodology likely explains why Nielsen, which relies only on panels for its traffic measures, sees a greater gap between Google and Yahoo and not in Yahoo’s favor. “During July 2013 we measured Google as the top parent company for web activity (170M unique US visitors) and Yahoo as the ranked fourth (126M unique US visitors) in the U.S.,” emailed a Nielsen spokesperson.

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Surprise: Americans Don’t Use The Internet for News

Nielsen released a report on the social media habits of Americans today, and guess what? It reveals that people mostly use the Internet for Twitter, gaming, videos and the classifieds, not online news. According to Poynter, Americans spend almost 23 percent of their browsing time on social media, compared to just three percent on “global news and current events.”

While some of the categories are vague, and every report should be treated with a grain of salt, this doesn’t sound good for online news sites. Maybe it doesn’t matter what The Boston Globe does after all.

Social networking sites weren’t the most popular though. The study says that we spend the majority of our Internet time — about 35 percent — on “other” sites. Yes, that means porn.

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