TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Norman Pearlstine’

Norman Pearlstine Opens Up

Norman Pearlstine, Time Inc.’s chief content officer, is not afraid to speak his mind. When Time began selling ads on its cover, Pearlstine brushed aside the notion that the practice was a bad thing, even though it broke ASME’s number one guideline.

In a wide-ranging interview with WWD, Pearlstine shares some more thoughts about the industry. Below are a few highlights, but be sure to read the entire piece.

On the future of Time, EW, SI and People:

You can’t just reprise the news. You have to have journalism that makes a point and you have to be in sync with your audience. When I think about Sports Illustrated, when I think about People, Entertainment Weekly, Time — all four of them have editors who are very much in touch with their readers and that’s a comfort to me.

On replacing Andy Serwer, Fortune’s longtime editor, with Alan Murray:

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Content Marketing 101

Content Marketing 101Starting September 8, get hands-on content marketing training in Content Marketing 101! Through a series of webcasts, content and marketing experts will teach you the best practices for creating, distributing and measuring the results of your brand's content, including how to develop a content marketing plan, become a content marketing and more. Register now! 

Travel + Leisure Editor Nancy Novogrod to Retire

Nancy Novogrod, editor of Travel + Leisure for the past 21 years, is retiring. She is leaving Time Inc. to write a book and (of course) travel.

“With enormous talent, unbridled passion and relentless energy, Nancy has done a brilliant job elevating the leading travel magazine into the most influential multiplatform travel brand,” wrote Time Inc.’s executive VP Evelyn Webster and chief content officer Norman Pearlstine, in a note. “Under her extraordinary leadership, T+L has become the undisputed trendsetter in the travel industry.”

Novogrod will work with Time Inc’s execs to find a successor.

You can read the full memo from Webster and Pearlstine below.

Read more

This is The End: Time Inc. Starts Selling Ads on Magazine Covers

As you know from our weekly Cover Battle feature (coming later today), FishbowlNY loves magazine covers. So we’re not exactly thrilled to learn that Time Inc. has started selling ad space on the fronts of Time and Sports Illustrated. You can go ahead and mark May 22, 2014, as the day magazine covers died.

Ad Age explains the placement of the ads:

For now the area devoted to the ads is very small: Subscribers may notice a Verizon logo in the mailing label area, next to the words ‘For Best Results Use Verizon’ and a page number for a traditional ad. Newsstand copies will print the ad by the bar code, although there won’t even be room there for the page number of the interior ad, according to a Time Inc. spokeswoman.

Read more

Time Inc. Newsroom Staffers to Report to Business Execs

TimeLifeBuildingRockCenter_articleboxWith Time Inc. about to be spun off into its own company, some might think now is not the right moment to drastically change things. However, that’s not the case. According to The New York Times, the company is removing the traditional separation between the editorial and business sides and making newsroom staffers report to business executives.

As you might guess, the change is not sitting well with most people. Current and former staffers expressed the obvious concern — that publishers would allow advertisers to influence content. And should a staffer suggest that was happening? Trouble. “People are really concerned about reporting to the business side,” a former Time Inc. exec, told the Times. “There’s a lot of trepidation about it.”

Joe Ripp, CEO of Time Inc., said there needn’t be any worrying. He sees the change as necessary to explore new revenue opportunities.

Plus, should any disputes arise between the newsroom and business side, they’ll be settled by Norman Pearlstine, Time Inc.’s chief content officer. Suffice to say that is not a job that we’d want.

Norm Pearlstine Networks With Bonnie Fuller

LunchAtMichaelsWe’re going to file this week’s lunch in under ‘The more things change, the more they stay the same.’ Aside from a dining room full of the usual Wednesdays at Michael’s suspects, comprised of moguls (Barry Diller), media mavens (Bonnie Fuller, Connie Anne Phillips) and money men who keep the lights on all over town (Alan Patricof), I had an illuminating chat with Donald Albrecht, curator of architecture and design at the Museum of the City of New York and the editor/contributor of the new book, Gilded New York Design, Fashion and Society (The Monacelli Press). We were introduced by Dan Scheffey, who, in his past life, has handled public relations for Disney, Miramax and most recently toiled at Conde Nast. Dan is currently working on Monacelli’s fall book list and is gearing up to launch the Spring 2014 list with Ellen Rubin. When he mentioned Gilded New York to me some months ago, I immediately wanted to know more. Donald, an independent curator specializing in the decorative arts and architecture, joined us to talk about his work on both the exhibition and the book on New York’s Gilded Age of the late 19th century.

Dan Scheffey, Diane Clehane and Donald Albrecht

From left: Dan Scheffey, Diane Clehane and Donald Albrecht

By way of introduction to the period he explained, “The city’s old and new money used architecture, interior design, fashion and events — even lunch and dinners — as markers of status.” See where I’m going with this?  I thought you might.

Donald, who traded his career as an architect to focus on curating exhibitions and writing (“I found working solely in architecture really boring”), explained his love of curating exhibitions as a way of producing “visual culture.” His current exhibition (which shares the same name of the companion book) “Gilded New York” runs through the end of next year and features a stunning collection of objects that lend a window into the fascinating lives of the early swells of New York City whose great fortunes built the vast Fifth Avenue mansions during what was arguably city’s most glamorous era. Among the relics of this bygone age visitors to the museum can see: an ”Electric Light” dress by couturier Charles Frederick Worth dress once worn by Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt. The gown (which didn’t really light up) earned its name from the glittering crystals that illuminated the bodice (a newspaper at the time breathlessly reported it had been trimmed in diamonds), Tiffany & Co.’s Bon Bonniere, a miniature purse designed to hold bon bons or small pieces of candy to be discreetly carried so it could be enjoyed while dancing, and a swan-billed flask crafted from engraved glass and silver. The funny thing is I have no doubt any one of the artifacts would be right at home worn by Sarah Jessica Parker or carried by — dare we say it – Kanye West — at the Met Ball, no?

Read more

Outgoing Time Inc. EIC Martha Nelson Gives Managing Editors Her Blessing

martha nelsonThere is no longer a Time Inc. editor-in-chief successor to receive the company’s symbolic, tongue-in-cheek heirloom. But that didn’t stop recently departed EIC Martha Nelson.

Per a great little item from Ad Age‘s Michael Sebastian, Nelson redirected to Time Inc. managing editors the gift of company tradition. A pair of recipients told Sebastian the framed papal memento comes with the following note:

‘This fragment comes from the ‘Pope’s Miter,’ which resided in the office of the editor in chief of Time Inc. While the miter was passed on in jest, it symbolized the earnest belief in editorial independence, truth and integrity. Now that responsibility rests in your hands.’

Read more

Time Inc.’s New Chief Content Officer on Native Advertising and TMZ

NPearlstineAt the Media Minds breakfast discussion this morning, new Time Inc. chief content officer Norman Pearlstine had some interesting things to say about media ethics in conversation with Alex S. Jones, director of the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics & Public Policy at Harvard. Jones, who pressed Pearlstine on the issues of native advertising, wondered how the exec would approach these issues at his new gig.

“[Native advertising] varies from brand to brand,” said Pearlstine. “It’s not to suggest that some magazines have a higher or lower standard, but that they’re different. If you think about the customer needs of some of our lifestyle magazines, they’re quite different from the customer needs from Time or Fortune.”

Read more

Norman Pearlstine on Why Editors Should Report to the Business Side

MediaMindsMedia pros gathered this morning at the Bryant Park Grill for a Media Minds discussion with Norman Pearlstine, newly installed chief content officer of Time Inc., and Alex S. Jones, director of the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics & Public Policy at Harvard. All were glad for Cathy Gay‘s return after an unfortunate fall left the producer and founder of the series unable to attend the previous one.

It goes without saying that much of the discussion revolved around the Time Inc. spin-off and Pearlstine’s new role as chief content officer, a move that has garnered much discussion about the elimination of church and state at the publisher. He previously served as editor-in-chief of Time Inc. from 1995 to 2005, a position that has now been eliminated. “The idea of having editors report to business leaders is not all that different from what happened in 1997, when I stopped reporting to the board of Time Warner,” said Pearlstine, who then started to report to former Time Inc. CEO Don Logan.

Read more

What Happens When Magazine Editors Start Reporting to the Business Side?

It is this week’s biggest and most far-reaching NYC media world question. What’s going to happen at Time Inc. now that editor-in-chief Martha Nelson is moving on and Norman Pearlstine, at CEO Joe Ripp‘s behest, has returned to oversee all such matters from the business side as executive VP and chief content officer.

Time__Inc_-logo-2ED06AA15C-seeklogo.com_AP recently announced that it will be entering the sponsored content game in 2014, so let’s start out by reminding ourselves that the rules are changing fast, and often. Ad Age media reporter Michael Sebastien spoke to both Ripp and Pearlstine in the wake of this week’s seismic news. Ripp restated something he said in the official announcement – that it’s designed to speed up the content work-cycle:

“Whenever you have a very large organization as ourselves and important decisions need to be cleared through multiple layers it creates a slowdown of the process,” Mr. Ripp said. “I’m a firm believer that businesses are more successful when you can empower people at a local brand level.”

“It will help create entrepreneurship at the brands,” Mr. Pearlstine said.

Read more

Norman Pearlstine Returning to Time Inc.

Time__Inc_-logo-2ED06AA15C-seeklogo.com_Fortune senior editor Dan Primack has posted some major parent company news. Norman Pearlstine is leaving his post as chief content officer at Bloomberg LP to assume a “similar position” with Time Inc.

From Primack’s report:

The move comes as Time Inc. is preparing to spin out from corporate parent Time Warner (TWX), which is expected to occur early next year.

This is a homecoming of sorts for Pearlstine, who served as editor-in-chief of Time Inc. from 1995 through 2005 (after more than two decades with The Wall Street Journal, and a short stint running Forbes).

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>